Bandit Lair Trap Ideas?

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I'm running a campaign and it's been going well for the 2 months we've been running it. The party loves my puzzles, traps, etc.. I'm moving the party to an area where they will find a Hydra, battle it then reach the Bandit Lair they were told about. The Lair is actually a Dragon's Hoarde and the Dragon was the Bandit Leader who died. I devised a way to make the treasure unaccessible without them going through a series of trapped rooms that the Bandit Leader set up (they use special teleportation coins but they all died in the treasure room!).

I'm trying to think of traps and rooms that would be set up in a Bandit area to prevent adventurers from entering and taking the loot. It has to make sense with the Bandits and possibly the Red Dragon (Bandit Leader). I've thought of a room with a riddle and you spell the answer out by moving on the floor tiles (Indiana Jones style!). Another room is a distraction where they must exit via the door they used to reach the room they are in to progress. I wanted to incorporate some type of devious fire trap/puzzle room to make sense with the Dragon, as if he was the only able to pass it because he was a dragon and immune to fire.

Ideas? Comments? 
Ideas? Comments? 

Ask your players what they'd enjoy encountering.

If I have to ask the GM for it, then I don't want it.

Ideas? Comments? 

Ask your players what they'd enjoy encountering.




I think you missed the point of the question. I was looking for an idea or two. If I ask them then they will know what to encounter...
Ideas? Comments? 

Ask your players what they'd enjoy encountering.

I think you missed the point of the question. I was looking for an idea or two.

No, I got that. But how are we supposed to give you ideas, when we don't know specifically what your players would enjoy? Only they know that.

If I ask them then they will know what to encounter...

That's right. But since what they encounter would be at least in part their idea, if they short-circuit it they're only blocking their own creativity.

If I have to ask the GM for it, then I don't want it.

I've given them a few thinking puzzles and they definitely enjoy danger. They've dodged death a few times already with lucky rolls. I don't want to kill them but some sort of fire trap would fit the lair. Just not sure what would be rigged in a place like this. Dungeons are simple to think of things. Most often they were designed to keep everyone/thing out, but these bandits would have navigated the traps to get to the treasure room from time to time.
I've given them a few thinking puzzles and they definitely enjoy danger. They've dodged death a few times already with lucky rolls. I don't want to kill them but some sort of fire trap would fit the lair. Just not sure what would be rigged in a place like this. Dungeons are simple to think of things. Most often they were designed to keep everyone/thing out, but these bandits would have navigated the traps to get to the treasure room from time to time.

Sorry, it's just that I've regularly seen people put a lot of work into ideas for traps only to have them fall flat when they players engage with them. I get that you're trying to avoid that, but the only real way to avoid it is to collaborate with them on it. Surprises are fun, but only when the basis of the surprise is a good payoff. Traps are a risky sort of surprise, because while they're fun in theory, they're also designed to cause problems.

The traps don't need to be something a dragon would be immune to, because they could be keyed to allow the dragon and his allies through. That's simple enough magic, especially for a dragon, and this frees you up from one key restriction to your ideas.

You say you don't want to kill them. If that's the case, then you shouldn't try to kill them. The risk should be to their time and maybe their equipment, rather than their lives. It would make sense for the dragon to snare intruders in order to make meals out of them, but capture is more boring than death.

If I have to ask the GM for it, then I don't want it.

I've given them a few thinking puzzles and they definitely enjoy danger. They've dodged death a few times already with lucky rolls. I don't want to kill them but some sort of fire trap would fit the lair. Just not sure what would be rigged in a place like this. Dungeons are simple to think of things. Most often they were designed to keep everyone/thing out, but these bandits would have navigated the traps to get to the treasure room from time to time.

Sorry, it's just that I've regularly seen people put a lot of work into ideas for traps only to have them fall flat when they players engage with them. I get that you're trying to avoid that, but the only real way to avoid it is to collaborate with them on it. Surprises are fun, but only when the basis of the surprise is a good payoff. Traps are a risky sort of surprise, because while they're fun in theory, they're also designed to cause problems.

The traps don't need to be something a dragon would be immune to, because they could be keyed to allow the dragon and his allies through. That's simple enough magic, especially for a dragon, and this frees you up from one key restriction to your ideas.

You say you don't want to kill them. If that's the case, then you shouldn't try to kill them. The risk should be to their time and maybe their equipment, rather than their lives. It would make sense for the dragon to snare intruders in order to make meals out of them, but capture is more boring than death.

Snaring. That was what I needed. I'll draw something up based on that, should be interesting to see how they want to escape because they've yet to be in that situation since the first session. I think maybe they do something wrong and are snared. Thanks!

Always the little things that elude me. I appreciate the assistance. 
Snaring. That was what I needed. I'll draw something up based on that, should be interesting to see how they want to escape because they've yet to be in that situation since the first session. I think maybe they do something wrong and are snared. Thanks!

Always the little things that elude me. I appreciate the assistance. 

Whoa, no, do NOT snare them. I am NOT advising that.

If I have to ask the GM for it, then I don't want it.

Here's some trap/puzzle ideas

a glass floored room. Underneath the glass floor is a water and dangerous aquatic creatures like sharks/giant squid, etc. The players can all walk across the floor normally, but when they return laden with treasure, they are too heavy and the floor suddenly shatters. Alternatively, have one of the items be cursed to emit a high pitched frequency that shatters glass but the players can't hear (you can provide a clue in that when they enter the treasure room all their potions and glass items shatter).

Here's a classic. A false treasure room with coppers painted gold, and "magic" treasure that only appears magic due to minor illusions. There is a secret door that leads farther in, but the players may end up leaving due to believing they have the dragon's treasure.

A room with a guardian that asks for a password to continue, "friends of dragonkind may continue, all others meet their doom" On the wall are hundreds of glowing runes. These are exploding rune traps that explode when they are read. However, savvy players who look for words written in draconic can find the password (all the other runes are written in common).
the 4e book draconomicon-chromatic dragons has a section of traps in a dragon's lair
How about a guard dog in the form of a rust monster?  The bandits may have gotten past in the past by having treats in the form of some especially tasty metal "cookies".  If the players have been exploring and were to find a bucket of such "cookies" perhaps they were clever enough to grab a few even if they didn't know what they were.  Maybe this rust monster can be waylaid by tossing it a few treats that distract it enough for anyone to pass through without it attacking their gear.  Not so much a classic trap, but a hazard to be avoided regardless. 

If I were to design from the ground up, I would include some kind of keycards too.  In my own games it could be as anachronistic as a metal card issued to the troops in colored rankings.  But it could easily be something like an amulet or ring with an enchantment or something less material like a blessing or magical effect that is placed directly on those who are meant to pass it. 

When it comes to failure, I'd likely use traps on doors that the "keycards" could override that included remote alarms (both silent and audible) that could summon guards or alert the entire base.  Perhaps an enchantment that made the metal articles on affected targets turn red hot, or blasts of hot air that would singe all the hair off their face but give them enough advance warning to dodge away from the truly deadly flame blast that follows.    If  someone is really trig and wants disable the trap mechanically, there could be an elaborate mechanism for them to disassemble just behind a wall panel. 

Off the Top of My Head-  a room with a loose sand floor.  The party needs to cross quick enough to exit before the door closes or the bridge raises or the guards reach them, etc... Crossing the floor causes the sand to act like quicksand.  It's not more than 6 feet deep, which should avoid anyone dying from suffocation, and the sand doesn't pull them in too quickly.  With the players sinking first to ankle then knees then hips, posionous snakes (or wyverns or pseudodragons) enter the room through vents near the ceiling.  It will be easy to avoid killing the players by adjusting the toxicity of the snakes, or the numbers and strength of whatever you chose, but it will slow them down.  If the trap were avoided through the use of the above keycard option, thats easy enough.  If you wanted something more like an Indiana Jones trap, there could be a series of stepping stones that allowed quick passage by hopping from one to another, or chains with ringed ends that act as swings or even a pattern of pull switches. 

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