Resurrect a dead character as a vampire?

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I'm a bit new to D&D and I have a question about character creation. 
I've been playing in a weekly Encounters session, and during our last encounter my character died. He died with quite a bit of enmity in his heart towards the other members of his party, who could have saved him, but didn't. 

I wanted to know if it would go against any kind of rule if the new character that I brought to the table was, historically, my old character, but as a vampire.  

Hopefully this question makes sense and I don't sound like a total newb. 
Your character's backstory can be whatever you want it to be. Just know that Vampire is a terrible class, and resurrection is relatively cheap.

I would probably go with being a Revenant (Your Old Race) instead, anyway, as that would make a little bit more sense than completely changing what your character does.
"Invokers are probably better round after round but Wizard dailies are devastating. Actually, devastating is too light a word. Wizard daily powers are soul crushing, encounter ending, havoc causing pieces of awesome." -AirPower25 Sear the Flesh, Purify the Soul; Harden the Heart, and Improve the Mind; Born of Blood, but Forged by Fire; The MECH warrior reaches perfection.
Unless you really want the fangs, Revenant would be the best choice IMHO.
It fits the "back from the dead" thematic perfectly.

If you want to go with a vampire, check out the Vryloka (race) instead of the vampire (class).
There even is a game mechanic (Vryloka level 16 utility IIRC) to transform a dying character into a vryloka.

Your character's backstory can be whatever you want it to be. Just know that Vampire is a terrible class, and resurrection is relatively cheap.

I would probably go with being a Revenant (Your Old Race) instead, anyway, as that would make a little bit more sense than completely changing what your character does.



Very cool! Playing a Revenant will work perfectly for what I have in mind, thanks! ^_^
Why didn't they save you?  I'd have to question that they want you there at the table.

EDIT:  I have to throw in my thought that having one character who is actively against the other members of the party, will likely lead to conflict at the table.  At the end of that day, that's going to likely lower everyone's fun.
Why didn't they save you?  I'd have to question that they want you there at the table.

EDIT:  I have to throw in my thought that having one character who is actively against the other members of the party, will likely lead to conflict at the table.  At the end of that day, that's going to likely lower everyone's fun.



What he said.
Another day, another three or four entries to my Ignore List.
Why didn't they save you?  I'd have to question that they want you there at the table.

EDIT:  I have to throw in my thought that having one character who is actively against the other members of the party, will likely lead to conflict at the table.  At the end of that day, that's going to likely lower everyone's fun.

It was during a D&D encounters session. Everyone was playing Drow, so it was kindof every conniving elf for himself. I hold no ill will towards any of them for it, but I'd find it kind of fun if my character might.