10/4/2012 Top Decks: "A History Lesson: The Best Selesnya"

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This thread is for discussion of this week's Top Decks, which goes live Thursday morning on magicthegathering.com.
This was a good read and a good trip back in time. Although Erhnamgeddon looks like the most straightforward, all of them are decks that I would pick and expect to win, have fun and enjoy mental challenge while playing them. The last part sums it:

It was a somewhat straightforward creature deck that was anything but one-dimensional. It showed the world that such a strategy could be laced together in a particular way to answer the speed of aggression with quickly and expertly deployed stop signs, cut off control opponents' endgames and exhaust them to death, and transform in such a way as to force the remaining opponents to jump through heretofore unrevealed hoops.


Now this is what I expect from the GW pair and what constitutes my ideal deck: a proactive deck with different but powerful line of plays, a plan for every match and the capacity to face control decks on equal ground when the game goes long. THIS is how midrange decks should be all the time and development, if not design must provide players with the necessary tools for this decks to be possible.

My initial prognosis is that contrary to those good times, the current Selesnya lacks the cards to be flexible and interactive enough: there's no Geddon to blow up the manabases, no Glare or Yosei to keep the opponent's permanents tapped or even the playable tutor / card draw to keep gas in the long game (yes I know that stuff like Mwonvuli tracker and Garruk 2 exist, but I said playable). I'm afraid that the new Selesnya attempts will be the one-dimensional builds that those of the past weren't.

 I still hope a GW tier 1 midrange decks arises, and I'll be thanking Development if that actually happens.
If Limited gets in the way of printing good Constructed cards... Screw limited
I started paying attnetion to top 8 decklists right around 2005 or so.  Totally remember Ghazi-Glare, thought it was a really neat deck.  But...I didn't realize at the time that the concept of a "transformational sideboard" was created by that deck.  Transformational sideboard is just a term that I assumed was really old.  Didn't realize that one of my favourite decklists was the one that spawned the term.

Cats land on their feet. Toast lands peanut butter side down. A cat with toast strapped to its back will hover above the ground in a state of quantum indecision.

I know pretty much everyone knows this but I have to say: The Rock was Green-Black, not Green-Blue.
(sorry, I just can't help myself)
And more than being "just" a triple-Top 8 World Champion decklist, Ghazi-Glare was a teacher that, more than a dozen years later, we can still learn from.



I don't think 2005 was a dozen years ago.

This history lesson seems somewhat incomplete without mentioning that one game of the finals of the 2005 World Championships was decided by an unfortunate game rule violation: www.wizards.com/Magic/Magazine/Events.as...

I started paying attnetion to top 8 decklists right around 2005 or so.  Totally remember Ghazi-Glare, thought it was a really neat deck.  But...I didn't realize at the time that the concept of a "transformational sideboard" was created by that deck.  Transformational sideboard is just a term that I assumed was really old.  Didn't realize that one of my favourite decklists was the one that spawned the term.

It didn't and your assumption that it's really old was correct. The term was used long before, mostly for surprise sideboard strategies of various combo decks (for example Trix) for the mirror match, when combo parts (Illusions of Grandeur, Donate) would be replaced with hate (Pyroblast) and an alternative win condition (Phyrexian Negator).

And more than being "just" a triple-Top 8 World Champion decklist, Ghazi-Glare was a teacher that, more than a dozen years later, we can still learn from.

I don't think 2005 was a dozen years ago.

But we surely can still learn from Ghazi-Glare in 2018.

"I know pretty much everyone knows this but I have to say: The Rock was Green-Black, not Green-Blue.
(sorry, I just can't help myself)"

And designed by Sol Malka, if I'm not mistaken.  

"It didn't and your assumption that it's really old was correct. The term was used long before, mostly for surprise sideboard strategies of various combo decks (for example Trix) for the mirror match, when combo parts (Illusions of Grandeur, Donate) would be replaced with hate (Pyroblast) and an alternative win condition (Phyrexian Negator)."

THANK YOU.  A lot of people forget that was a large part of Trix's dominance was that you couldn't tell if the deck was changing or not (A least when top pros sideboarded) and whether your hate for the combo would be dead in your hand.

Those who fear the darkness have never seen what the light can do.

I've seen angels fall from blinding heights. But you yourself are nothing so divine. Just next in line.

191752181 wrote:
All I'm saying is, I don't really see how she goes around petrifying swords and boots and especially mirrors. How the heck does she beat a Panoptic Mirror? It makes no sense for artifacts either. Or enchantments, for that matter. "Well, you see, Jimmy cast this spell to flood the mountain, but then the gorgon just looked at the water really hard and it went away."