So did they just forget about Many-Arrows?

28 posts / 0 new
Last post
Many-Arrows gets two short mentions int he FR player's guide, a short discription in the FR campaign guide, and is briefly touched on in the novels following The Orc King, more or less as an afterthought. It hasn't been mentioned in a single Dragon article, and as far as I can tell it hasn't shown up in a single campaign or adventure suplement since 4e launched.

Hardly the groundshaking, revolutionary, world-turned-upside-down change that the thought of a united orc kingdom was made out to be in the Hunter's Blades trilogy or The Orc King. 

So, my question is why the complete lack of coverage over what was one of the bigger changes to the setting in the transition to 4e? You'd think it would rate at least one Eyes on the Realms article or a Winning Races: Half-orcs article. But it doesn't even have it's own regional benifits for characters starting there. 

Was it never meant to be anything but a token gesture to appease fans of warcraft? Is this writer revolt against the very idea of orcs as anything more than mooks? Do they not plan ahead after making it and realized they had no idea what they wanted to do with it? 
"One arrow alone can be easily broken, but Many-Arrows is indestructible."
I imagine there isn't much interest in many-arrows to justify the expense of creating lore for it.  Maybe they figure it's best left to DMs to handle it any way they wish.
If there was enough interest within the company to have an entire trilogy and then a third of another trilogy dedicated to the foundation of it, one would hope there would be enough interest left over, even if they were disapointed with fan reaction, to dedicate a single article to it at some point. 
"One arrow alone can be easily broken, but Many-Arrows is indestructible."
It isnt the only thing 4E FR campaign setting overlooks... best use 3E and even 2E material for missing FR fluf.

I'm just hoping D&D Next campaign setting is so thick with detail you wont have to constantly refer to old material. A nice 500 page book you could use as a club lol, with more (much more) npc descriptions/stat blocks, adventure hooks, maps etc.


  
Well, I did end up coming up with enough of my own fluff for Many-Arrows to fill it's own sourcebook, so honestly I'd probably only end up being annoyed by whatever they'd release. I'm just trying to figure out the logic in going to the trouble to create and justify the existance of an area and then not utilize it at all.
"One arrow alone can be easily broken, but Many-Arrows is indestructible."
the mess of 4e FR is best left forgotten.


there wasnt alot done novel wise with alot of it.

they did say at the beginning of 4e  that it would only be two books and one adventure book.


alot of us groaned that it was a mistake then, though we were groaning at alot of the things done with the realms back then too.......



      
a mask everyone has at least two of, one they wear in public and another they wear in private.....
I actually like a lot of things 4e realms brought to the table. I love the spellplague and the concept of spellscarred, I love the fact that Many-Arrows exists(lack of regional benifit not withstanding) if nothing else, I liked Neverwinter blowing up and Luskan sinking. I liked Thay becoming a mass of undead. I loved the returned Abier stuff, the greater proliferation of genasi, the end of the blood war...

I could go on.  
"One arrow alone can be easily broken, but Many-Arrows is indestructible."
Many-Arrows is basically the domain of Salvatore. An Eye on the Realms for Many-Arrows would most likely be offered to him, as novel writers seem to get Dragon writing offers as tie-ins. Another writer might prefer their own corner to cover.

Also, the best time to make a big deal about Many-Arrows would have been pre-Spellplague...now it's just another location and bigger things have happened in-Realms.
I actually like a lot of things 4e realms brought to the table. I love the spellplague and the concept of spellscarred, I love the fact that Many-Arrows exists(lack of regional benifit not withstanding) if nothing else, I liked Neverwinter blowing up and Luskan sinking. I liked Thay becoming a mass of undead. I loved the returned Abier stuff, the greater proliferation of genasi, the end of the blood war...

I could go on.  



EXCEPT Luskan didnt sink... Lantan did



I wont miss that place though.....




as I said alot of us moan about stuff when they put out the 4e realms.....

the time jump and deity cully and shoehorning 4e core lore into the realms were most of them..        

a mask everyone has at least two of, one they wear in public and another they wear in private.....
Technically Luskan did sink, just not very far. Lot of it's sinking into the marshy mouth of the river and bay. I was using "sink" in a more figurative sense, though, meaning how the city's degrated from a simple wretched hive port town to a hell on earth. 

And yes, I know a lot of people moan(and other things which would involve language inappropriete for these forums) about the 4e changes to the realms. With a few exceptions, I'm not one of them. I have a few complaints about 4e as a whole(not nearly as many as the general populous), but off the top of my head the only thing that really bothers me about 4e realms is Helm biting it. Couldn't care less about Mystra or the drow dieties if I tried, but that's just my personal preference.

 

 
Many-Arrows is basically the domain of Salvatore. An Eye on the Realms for Many-Arrows would most likely be offered to him, as novel writers seem to get Dragon writing offers as tie-ins. Another writer might prefer their own corner to cover.

Also, the best time to make a big deal about Many-Arrows would have been pre-Spellplague...now it's just another location and bigger things have happened in-Realms.



I can see how it might be considered Salvatore's as he's the guy they had write the books where it was founded, and it is right next door to his stomping ground, but it's a big enough nation that they can hand it off to another writer(providing Bob's not interested in doing anything with it himself) and let him play with it so long as he doesn't step over into the silver marches. 

I'd also disagree about the timing issue- not that that would have been a bad time, but a century later you have the kingdom as it's starting to stablize and ground itself. That's the time when it's really ready to get out there and make an impact on the world.

Doesn't even need to be something big, really. Could just be some local fluff. I mean after all, we've got Ed writing Eyes on articles about a certain kind of wine or a single door in a city the size of Waterdeep- they don't all have to be ground shakers. 
"One arrow alone can be easily broken, but Many-Arrows is indestructible."
I don't think there is a huge demand for any material on many-arrows from players.  This is the first thread I have ever seen about it.  If there was more demand, there would likely be more supply.
I don't think there was a lot of demand for many of the changes in 4e in general. The changes to tieflings and deva, for instance; I don't think anyone was calling out for those.

That being said, when you have a new product, you don't wait for the demand to rise before you put it out there. You promote it. You wave a big sign over it, you get people interested in it. You create the demand. Best product the world doesn't mean anything without advertising. Drow wouldn't be nearly as popular as they are  if it weren't for Mr. Salvatore, for better or worse. There wasn't anyone clamoring for a dark elf hero back then, but it took off. 

I don't know, maybe I'm looking at it backwards, but to me it's simple; promote it, generate interest in it, don't wait around for the fanbase to ask for it. 
"One arrow alone can be easily broken, but Many-Arrows is indestructible."
No matter how much you advertise for the orcs, I doubt you'd find many people who ever get ga-ga over them.  You promote things that are /likely/ to generate interest.  That's not orcs.  There are reasons why people are interested in the Drow, and not so much interested in the other "evil" races.

- Drow are pretty.  As a drow fanoboi, it pains me to admit this, but people dig them because of that.  Orcs are not pretty.

- Drow are highly skilled.  What they do, they are /very/ good at.  They are precise and deadly.  Orcs are brutish and hit stuff hard.  While the drow go for precision, the orcs go for overpowering force.  People like the precise skill of the drow

- Drow society is filled with intrigue, and betrayal.  There's a lot of room for interesting drama.  Orc society is "strongest orc leads until he is no longer strongest"

- Drow are sophisticated.  Orcs are simple.

This really is no different then the level of "support" for the elves vs the dwarves.  The elf guys love the elf support, and everyone else is, like, "Hey, enough elf crap already, we have enough.  How bout some love for .  The simple fact is, most people don't care about orc society.  They are there to provide low level enemies for adventurers to kill.  That's the problem with your perspective I think.  You're assuming that because you are intersted in something, many people might be, when you're kind of the minority.

it's like my desire for more Duergar support.  Yeah, I'd like to have some, but at the end of the day, not many people other then me care about Duergar at all.  It is what it is.
Oh, I'm fighting an up hill battle to be sure. But things never change when you stay quiet about it.

They gave me an inch with Many-Arrows, and I aim to take as close to a mile as I possibly can. 
"One arrow alone can be easily broken, but Many-Arrows is indestructible."
I think it all comes down to the designers' comfort zone.

Many-Arrows was an experiment - establish a kingdom of civilized/non-evil orcs next to one of the most recognizable bastions of good in the Realms, and see what happens. It rocked the boat for those people who insisted orcs needed to be savage and ruthless, and/or those who didn't want the Silver Marches to have a new neighbor, whereas someone like myself was happy to see it added. It doesn't really seem like there was ever an "end-goal" in mind when it came to Many-Arrows, from an out-of-game perspective. It just seemed like the type of addition that *could* be used somewhere down the line if there were interest in utilizing it - in other words, it was there because it had potential, but that potential didn't have a specific direction.

Perhaps RAS or those talking to him thought he would do more with it. Perhaps he was initially supposed to, but plans changed with the advent of Neverwinter. I'm not sure I feel that the reason MA has gone untouched for so long is because people are hesitant to make a move should RAS wish to work with it again, but who knows. Considering how many new ideas and changes were introduced with 4E, it seems more likely to me that Many-Arrows just ended up getting lost in the shuffle.

In any event, the designers tend to focus on those areas that have been tried and tested, the ones that can already boast a record of success. It's why we'll never be at a loss for new articles and books detailing Waterdeep, Cormyr, the Moonsea, and the Dalelands. The most popular areas will never be starving for attention, and there will always be high interest when something new comes out for those places. Unfortunately, this makes exploring new waters a less-appealing proposition. The lesser-seen areas of the Realms tend to fight amongst themselves when it comes time to decide what place gets the spotlight next, and unfortunately, Many-Arrows is one of many in that boat.

As someone who is fond of Many-Arrows, it's my hope that 5E will do more for Obould's kingdom than 4E did. Of course, I'm sure there are plenty out there who want to see Many-Arrows invaded and conquered by a dwarven army come 5E's dawn, so we will have to see.
My Sig
Reality is but the sum total of all illusions. Proud Hand of Karsus, now and forever Mess with one Hand, mess with 'em all I am Blue/Green
I am Blue/Green
Take The Magic Dual Colour Test - Beta today!
Created with Rum and Monkey's Personality Test Generator.
"just do what LM the lord of magical might does, and you'll be fine" - sfdragon, 10/12/09
Board Snippets
147048523 wrote:
"I don't like X, they should remove it." "I like X, they should keep it." "They should replace X with Y." "Anybody that likes X is dumb. Y is better." "Why don't they include both X and Y." "Yeah, everybody can be happy then!" "But I don't like X, they should remove it." "X really needs to be replaced with Y." "But they can include both X and Y." "But I don't like X, they need to remove it." "Remove X, I don't like it." Repeat. Obstinance?
56790678 wrote:
Until you've had an in-law tell you your choice of game was stupid, and just Warcraft on paper, and dumbed down for dumber players who can't handle a real RPG, you haven't lived. You haven't lived.
56902498 wrote:
Lady and gentlemen.... I present to you the Edition War without Contrition, the War of the Web, the Mighty Match-up! We're using standard edition war rules. No posts of substance. Do not read the other person's posts with comprehension. Make frequent comparison to video games, MMOs, and CCGs. Use the words "fallacy" and "straw man", incorrectly and often. Passive aggressiveness gets you extra points and asking misleading and inflammatory questions is mandatory. If you're getting tired, just declare victory and leave the thread. Wait for the buzzer... and.... One, two, three, four, I declare Edition War Five, six, seven eight, I use the web to Go!
57062508 wrote:
D&D should not return to the days of blindfolding the DM and players. No tips on encounter power? No mention of expected party roles? No true meaning of level due to different level charts or tiered classes? Please, let's not sacrifice clear, helpful rules guidelines in favour of catering to the delicate sensibilities of the few who have problems with the ascetics of anything other than what they are familiar with.
56760448 wrote:
Just a quick note on the MMORPG as an insult comparison... MMORPGs, raking in money by the dumptruck full. Many options, tons of fans across many audiences, massive resources allocated to development. TTRPGs, dying product. Squeaking out an existence that relys on low cost. Fans fit primarily into a few small demographics. R&D budgets small, often rushed to market and patched after deployment. You're not really making much of an argument when you compare something to a MMORPG and assume people think that means bad. Lets face it, they make the money, have the audience and the budget. We here on this board are fans of TTRPGs but lets not try to pretend none of us play MMORPGs.
90571711 wrote:
Adding options at the system level is good. Adding options at the table level is hard. Removing options at the system level is bad. Removing options at the table level is easy. This is not complicated.
57333888 wrote:
112760109 wrote:
56902838 wrote:
Something like Tactical Shift is more magical than martial healing.
Telling someone to move over a few feet is magical now? :| I weep for this generation.
Given the laziness and morbid obsesity amongst D&Ders, being able to convince someone to get on their feet, do some heavy exercise, and use their words to make them be healthier must seem magical.
158710691 wrote:
D&D definitely improves mental health; Just as long as you stay away from these forums ;)
I think it all comes down to the designers' comfort zone.

Many-Arrows was an experiment - establish a kingdom of civilized/non-evil orcs next to one of the most recognizable bastions of good in the Realms, and see what happens. It rocked the boat for those people who insisted orcs needed to be savage and ruthless, and/or those who didn't want the Silver Marches to have a new neighbor, whereas someone like myself was happy to see it added. It doesn't really seem like there was ever an "end-goal" in mind when it came to Many-Arrows, from an out-of-game perspective. It just seemed like the type of addition that *could* be used somewhere down the line if there were interest in utilizing it - in other words, it was there because it had potential, but that potential didn't have a specific direction.

Perhaps RAS or those talking to him thought he would do more with it. Perhaps he was initially supposed to, but plans changed with the advent of Neverwinter. I'm not sure I feel that the reason MA has gone untouched for so long is because people are hesitant to make a move should RAS wish to work with it again, but who knows. Considering how many new ideas and changes were introduced with 4E, it seems more likely to me that Many-Arrows just ended up getting lost in the shuffle.

In any event, the designers tend to focus on those areas that have been tried and tested, the ones that can already boast a record of success. It's why we'll never be at a loss for new articles and books detailing Waterdeep, Cormyr, the Moonsea, and the Dalelands. The most popular areas will never be starving for attention, and there will always be high interest when something new comes out for those places. Unfortunately, this makes exploring new waters a less-appealing proposition. The lesser-seen areas of the Realms tend to fight amongst themselves when it comes time to decide what place gets the spotlight next, and unfortunately, Many-Arrows is one of many in that boat.

As someone who is fond of Many-Arrows, it's my hope that 5E will so more for Obould's kingdom than 4E did. Of course, I'm sure there are plenty out there who want to see Many-Arrows invaded and conquered by a dwarven army come 5E's dawn, so we will have to see.



This is a very good post.  As for myself, I am apathetic towards Many-Arrows.  I really don't care about it at all, either way.  It's not hurting me out there.  For those who like it, I'd prefer to /not/ have it crushed under an army of dwarves, but I'm perfectly fine with the thought to let DM's sort out it's destiny as well.

I just think that as you point out, more people are going to be interested in Waterdeep, Cormyr, the Dales and Moonsea.  I also think that it's good to have a mix of highly detailed locales, and others that are much less detailed.  That mixture allows for all DMs to find an area which meets their desires.
Actually I like most of 4Es material, gods have died before so It didn't bother me when they made those bold moves. I also enjoyed the spellplague, I thought that was a creative cataclysm.

What I didn't like is the lack in 4Es material. The Campaign Setting is one of those books that needs to be a bible, a heavy loader. The player's handbook needs to be nice and compact as its a tool, same for the FR player's guide. But the Campaign Setting is a reference for the GM, he needs all that info (the more the better), most of all, he shouldn't need to go looking at past editions for source material.
Truth be told I agree that some places should remain realatively undeveloped to give DM's freedom to do with what they will. In fact I think I've done quite a good job of developing Many-Arrows as an indepth kingdom in my own game. 

What befuddles me is simply the complete lack of attention given to the place when it was one of the major changes leading into 4e realms. I would have expected to see something, at the very least I would have expected there to be a regional benifit in the player's guide since there was one for everywhere else, and Many-Arrows makes a lot of sense as a starting place for half-orc pc's.

LordManshoon is probably right in that it simply got lost in the suffle(hence the title of this thread), I'm just disapointed by that fact.
"One arrow alone can be easily broken, but Many-Arrows is indestructible."
well I look at it all this way



anything in 4e realms that WAS NOT touched on more than the what was in the FR campaign books( this includes the character guide, the campaign guide, the nwn book, and menzo book) or any of the novels and ddi articles is something that can be changed and or altered for 5e.




        
a mask everyone has at least two of, one they wear in public and another they wear in private.....
They could at least do a map, did they even do a map for it in 3e?
I survived Section 4 and all I got was this lousy sig Off-topic and going downhill from there
They could at least do a map, did they even do a map for it in 3e?



no I dont think they did
a mask everyone has at least two of, one they wear in public and another they wear in private.....
I think a good follow-up to the Neverwinter Campaign Setting could involve Many-Arrows as a main faction in the north for Paragon and Epic tiers. But please, focused on 4e, not that silly "edition-neutral" idea they had for Menzoberranzan. Sorry, I've been D&D'ing since 1999, loved 3.5 but I loved 4e even more.
Having communicated with several of the authors in my role as LFR Writing Director for Waterdeep, I have observed the strong etiquette that one does not borrow or write about another's character without express willingness to share.  As a LFR Writing Director, during the period we were canon, we had to get permission for usage of any sigificant NPC in one of our adventures.

For an author such as Bob, I doubt he gets told what to do much by WotC. His time is filled by many novels and projects. I think the development of the Kingdom of Many Arrows was an interesting plot line he used for Drizzt and development for FR. I doubt a strong reason existed in the minds of the FR team that more needed to be published on it as compared to many areas in the Realms in the 4e era. With the business model of only creating "lore light" material (which I think they are realizing was probably a mistake), choices have to be made.


In contrast, Ed prefers his story line with Elminster and friends in Cormyr, etc for his novels, but Waterdeep is particularly special to Ed so he naturally spins small details as part of his contribution to DDI.    


I think the other posts suggesting that the orc kingdom is simply not as high an interest as other areas is probably correct.  YMMV.



Keith  


     
Keith Hoffman LFR Writing Director for Waterdeep
Fair enough. 

I don't deny that my interests in orcs and an orc kingdom place me in a minority. I just hope that it is a minority that will be shown some love when 5e rolls around. 
"One arrow alone can be easily broken, but Many-Arrows is indestructible."
The problem with Many-Arrows from a gaming point-of-view is that it is a settled, lawful (not in the D&D alignment sense) and racially homogenous (more or less) area. That doesn't make it a good setting for adventures, per se, and may also be why no RPG designers have very tried to develop it further.

That said, I love using Many-Arrows as the background location for orc exiles. These exiles are the traditional rapacious orcs who wish to destroy and plunder and maybe gather enough power to "purify" Many-Arrows. In that respect, I like the existence of Many-Arrows because of this bit of background it provides but I see no need or utility value in a Backdrop article (unless, of course, it came with a really good map of the North because the 4E FR maps blow chunks of rancid green slime).
 
Cheers Imruphel aka Scrivener of Doom


 

It's only as settled as you make it; the interior and the borderlands between Many-Arrows and the Silver Marches are relatively settled, yes, but at least in my game when you head north or head west you find a wild and rugged untamed land. It's a kingdom in a constant state of war against tribes of giants, goblinoids, and human barbarians that surround them, where monster hunting- and dragon hunting, with the spine being full of dragon lairs right from the picking- is one of the more popular and profitable professions. Exploration into the local underdark is another big part of it- Many-Arrows sees all the land within it's boarders as it's own, even what's underneath the surface.


Even in the interior, in Dark Arrows and other well settled regions there's room for intrigue; politics between rival tribes vying for power- much more straightforward than the schemes between drow families and human nobles, but no less cut throat. Another issue is the ethical issues regarding the slave trade and treatment of prisoners of war. Also present are business rivalries between mining or ranching operations(if you don't think these can be exciting you need to watch more westerns). Which of course is to say nothing of religious disputes between the old, more traditional orcs and the new, more progressive orcs and their rival gruuman cults- beyond being in a perpetual state of war with it's neighbors, it's in a perpetual state of holy-war with it's self.


One of the things I did in my campaign when developing Many-Arrows is that I eliminated the racial homogony of the area; while it's still 65-70% orcish/half-orcish, it has a substantial population of humans, dwarves, duergar, genasi, shifters, goliaths, ogres, trolls, and goblinoids, with smaller groups of dragonborn, drow, minotaurs, and tieflings.


Human and dwarven citizens of Many-Arrows come from two main sources. The first would be fugitives fleeing justice from the south deciding that Luskan was becoming simply too much of a dive and a risk, and that it may not be far enough away from their problems to escape. The quarantine that the city would be put under during the novel Shadowbane would also motivate more fugitives to head further north towards the Spine and Many-Arrows.


The other source is enterprising, progressive orc tribes bringing in human and dwarven mercenaries to support their troops, and in some cases even train their warriors to combine orcish savagery with human and dwarven military discipline. Aside from these sources, plenty of humans are the result of the orcs raising orphans left from their battles with the Uthgart tribes of the area.


Duergar in Many-Arrows are a callback to an earlier campaign I was in(but wasn't dming) that involved a semi-nomadic community of exiled duergar that, over the course of their campaign, were driven from their settlement. Later, with the permission of the dm of that game I transplanted that community to my Many-Arrows settlement, with the story that they had wandered through the underdark looking for a place to settle and finally came to an agreement where they would help work the metal from Many-Arrows' booming mining industry(a plethora of untapped ore veins in the spine ripe for the taking, which was another big draw for immigrants) into armor and weapons in exchange for military protection from underdark threats and citizenship.


Genasi come from a few different places- most of them are earthsouls and windsouls who were already living in the region and decided that it was better to inergrate with the orcs than fight them off like the human barbarians. Others migrated here- some mercenaries brought in with the humans and dwarves, some fugitives on the run, some Abeirnians(and this applies to most of the dragonborn as well as some humans and half-orcs) were drawn by the promise of dragons to hunt in the wilds of Many-Arrows, and weren't disappointed. Others, mainly stormsouls, came due to an attraction to certain religious movements in Many-Arrows that I'll cover later.

Many-Arrows' shifter population mainly comes from right across the river in Glimmerwood; the People of the Black Blood, shifters and lycanthropes alike deciding to migrate into Many-Arrows for the promise of religious freedom and considerably less restrictions on Malar worship than they were receiving from the elves. Like the human mercenaries they were recruited by clever orc chiefs to bolster and diversify the ranks of their tribes, adding lycanthropes and druids to their arsenal.


Goliaths, like genasi, were mainly indigenous to the area; a lot of them had a certain amount of respect for the orcs, their strength, their prowess and fearlessness in battle, and in turn the orcs respected the goliaths for their power. The integration was easy, with goliaths finding easy utility within orcish society.


Goblinoid citizens(distinguished from members of goblin tribes that reside within Many-Arrows' boarders but are actively fighting against the Kingdom) are primarily the descendants of tribes who were either conquered or who willingly came over to the orc's side to avoid annihilation.


Most dragonborn who live in Many-Arrows were members of those human or dwarven mercenary bands who were brought in to fight and train, or came seeking dragons to kill in the Spine, and found they fit in well with the society and decided to stay.


Drow in Many-Arrows have a complicated place in society; in my games the nation has come under attack by drow several times, both overt and covert, seeing an united kingdom of orcs as too big a threat as it could potentially serve as a beacon for their slaves to rise in revolt. And that's not an unfounded fear as one of my campaign plots involved agents of Many-Arrows infiltrating a drow city as slaves aiming to do just that to bolster it's own population and weaken the drow threat. Still, most orcs recognize the part Drizzt played in helping to found their kingdom(grudgingly or otherwise) and many of Obould's hero-cults look at Drizzt as having been a worthy opponent for their patron, which affords some measure of respect towards those drow who are renegades fleeing their society. Such individuals are also expected to provide some services towards Many-Arrows, whether it's providing them with intelligence relating towards drow or other underdark threats, with magic items of drow origin, or serving as spies or instructors for Many-Arrows' armies.


Minotaurs I admit are just kind of thrown in here, but they're one of the 4e player races that just aren't well integrated into the realms in a way that lets them interact as social creatures rather than monsters. Many-Arrows is as good a place as any to throw them.


Another aspect I've applied to Many-Arrows in my homegame is near complete freedom of religion- elven deities are the only ones that are completely outlawed(Lolth included). There's very little in the way of organized religion; some cults are more organized than others, but with a couple exceptions there's nothing that could be called a church or a clergy. Still, most non-orcish faiths are required to pay some form of tribute or homage to the more numerous and powerful orcish cults that tolerate them. All of the Nishrek gods are worshiped prominently here; Luthic, Bahgtru, Ilneval, Obould, Shargaas, Vaprak, and Yutrus, though all of their cults acknowledge Gruumsh as their chief.


One of the biggest religious movements is what I call the Cult of the Storm That Never Sleeps, or the Cult of the One-Eyed Storm. They're a cult that variously believes that Gruumsh either killed Talos during the Spellplague and assumed his mastery over storms, or (in more fringe cases) believe that Talos was always a mask worn by Gruumsh. The cult extends into primal worshipers among shaman and druids who revere Gruumsh as a spirit of the storm and destruction, but over all the cult's take leans towards an unaligned view rather than a chaotic evil one, worshiping Gruumsh as a god of power and strength, his destruction a force of nature rather than an act of cruelty or malice. They also see him as a force of freedom and change, destroying one thing to make room for the next, as well as a fertility god- his lightning may cause forest fires, but the ash from that fire enriches the soil and lets new life grow. Non orcs who worship Gruumsh likely belong to this cult, especially stormsoul genasi. This cult is one of the bigger enemies of both the traditional worshipers of Gruumsh as well as human worshipers of Talos. One of the main inspirations for this cult was the Lightning Blitzer paragon path detailed in Dragon Magazine #386.


Asmodeus worship and devil worship in general is openly allowed in Many-Arrows, though independent cults are watched closely. Asmodeus worship was brought here by the duergar, who worship Asmodeus as their liberator from the mind flayers, as their protector, as a great warrior, and master schemer. Such beliefs were often passed to the orcish apprentices of the druegar forge masters, allowing devil worship to spread. While Asmodeus is the most popular object of worship among devil worshippers in Many-Arrows, small cults to the other archdevils exist- Bel enjoys considerably more popularity here than perhaps anywhere else in Toril, being a warrior's devil suits him towards the orcs and goblinoids tastes. Dispator is right alongside Gond as the go-to patron for duergar and orc architects who design or otherwise improve on the many fortresses and strongholds throughout the kingdom. For mercantile matters, Mammon's cult is more popular than Waukeen or Graz'zt. And in matters of the forge, many Duergar name Belial their patron as their forging techniques are those of the Phlegethos, the Fourth Hell. Fiernia and Glasya also have small cults in Many-Arrows, though they're mainly devoted to carnal pleasures, and Levestius, Baalzebul, and Mephistopholes have no real cults to speak of.


Among humans, by far the most popular god worshiped in Many-Arrows is Tempus, patron to many a mercenary and adventurer who immigrated here. Worship of Garagos is almost unheard of here, with Gruumsh occupying his role. An interesting cult of Tempus worshipers, primarily human though including other races, has popped up, though no official name has been given to them. Their message is that Tempus and Gruumsh are battle-brothers, worthy rivals who've fought alongside one another against the enemies of the gods. While this cult hasn't gotten much momentum, it has done something to help improve human orc relations, though the local barbarians see it as an affront. The Red Knight is another popular choice among the mercenary population, especially those hired specifically to educate orcs in military strategy.


Among the dwarves, Moradin of course is the most popular god, here like anywhere, though worship of him tends to be downplayed as it causes tension with the orcs and most dwarves know they're here at the orc's suffrage- this earns them the resentment of dwarves to the south for caving to orcish demand, but they worship regardless. In public, Vergadain tends to be the most popular dwarven deity, followed by Clangeddin Silverbeard and Thard Harr.


Bane and Maglublyet maintain decent sized cults among the goblinoid population, though most of them have converted to Gruumsh worship, at least publicly. Bane does maintain cults among the humans who've immigrated here, largely among the more ruthless mercenaries who choose the Black Hand over the Lord of Battles. Still, most in Many-Arrows are too wild for Bane worship, and his cult does little in the way of recruiting here.


Auril, Akadi, Grumbar, and Kossuth(in that order) are also popular objects of worship in Many-Arrows, primarily among genasi, but all orcs who live in the cold mountains pay some homage to Auril, Akadi, and Grumbar, and Kossuth is popular among orcs who seek to use fire as a weapon.


Malar is the most popular patron of shifters, lycanthropes, and rangers in Many-Arrows, surpassing Silvanus or Mielikki(though both do have worshipers here). Likewise, Talona enjoys some popularity here, her cult closely allied with both Luthic and Yutrus.


It's not all evil, of course; Amaunator, Torm, Ilmater, Milil, and Sharess all enjoy small, growing cults here, with several orcs expressing interests in them to various degrees and for various reasons, though the actual number who have accepted these gods as their patrons is extremely small, many do pay some homage to them.



...That's about...little more than half of the work I've done developing Many-Arrows. Sure, granted, pulled a lot of that out of whole cloth for my campaign, but if I can do it I'm sure someone who gets paid to do this for a living has the creativity to really delve into it.

"One arrow alone can be easily broken, but Many-Arrows is indestructible."
Tweak_the_Whacked, I just wanted to say how much I enjoyed your write-up of Many Arrows. Great stuff. That's the sort of location I would use.
Cheers Imruphel aka Scrivener of Doom
Glad you enjoyed it.
"One arrow alone can be easily broken, but Many-Arrows is indestructible."