"Beginners dice set" for D&D next

After witnessing some dice confusion suffered by new players coming to D&D, I thought of this idea: A color-coded set of dice for new players. The d20 is red, d12 is blue, etc.

So when you say "roll a d20 to hit" you can add on "that's the red one" to help a confused newbie. I've found that d20 and d12 are often confused. 
When my first DM taught me to play D&D, he had me memorize the dice before he let me play. I had to be able to identify the die blindfolded by touch only. These were the old school mud dice, too.

I am not saying we should be that tough on new players, I have 2 newbies in my own group. I think as DMs maybe we should encourage new players to buy color coded die instead of "pretty" ones (like my new players always go for).

Are WoTC branded color coded Beginners Dice a good idea? Yeah, I think so, but I think the same can be done just going to the local game store and picking out some $.15 a piece dice.
As a rule of thumb new players in my group end up using my old dice set (which all matching die sizes are the same colour) until they can play smoothly. Then they can bring their own dice to the table.

Me personally, im a supersticious sort, I have my own coloured dice which nobody touches.

"hand me the d20"
"here you go"
"no I meant the good one" 
As a rule of thumb new players in my group end up using my old dice set (which all matching die sizes are the same colour) until they can play smoothly. Then they can bring their own dice to the table.

Me personally, im a supersticious sort, I have my own coloured dice which nobody touches.

"hand me the d20"
"here you go"
"no I meant the good one" 



My group formed originally to play HackMaster. We really took to the "Dont touch my dice" atmosphere the game encouraged. We even began putting bad rolling dice in "time out". I have a bag of metal dice I cant use as a player anymore because they ALWAYS roll badly when I am a player.
The dice included in the Red Box were just such a set. Very ugly but easy to keep track of.
As a rule of thumb new players in my group end up using my old dice set (which all matching die sizes are the same colour) until they can play smoothly. Then they can bring their own dice to the table.

Me personally, im a supersticious sort, I have my own coloured dice which nobody touches.

"hand me the d20"
"here you go"
"no I meant the good one" 



My group formed originally to play HackMaster. We really took to the "Dont touch my dice" atmosphere the game encouraged. We even began putting bad rolling dice in "time out". I have a bag of metal dice I cant use as a player anymore because they ALWAYS roll badly when I am a player.



A friend of mine used to keep his dice in the freezer until game time. "They roll better when they're cold," he said.
See this is the reason I think players should be forced into basic dice to begin, you need that to learn at first but when your finally ready and get your own set... I dunno, it kind of becomes "your thing".

Lots of players get attached to a dice set, and even more get attached to one special die.

Wizards could comission a special set of D20s or such, I personally love searching the internet for new ones. Personal favourite, an ivory D20, the D20 that I refuse to use with a "good" character. 
My favorite dice are a pair of grey 20 siders - one light, one dark - plain and unpainted. The very first time I ever used them was as DM, in an encounter in which the players, all elves, were ambushed by some goblins. It was meant to be a quick encounter, just to set the mood. The goblins weren't a real threat.

Except that no one had told my new dice that. I don't know how many natural 20's I rolled, but it was a lot. Those goblins wiped the floor with the player elves, who were forced to retreat.

From that day on, 15+ years ago, those dice have been known as "the elf slayers" and have a special slot in my dice case where other dice may not disturb them. I only use them against elves.
After witnessing some dice confusion suffered by new players coming to D&D, I thought of this idea: A color-coded set of dice for new players. The d20 is red, d12 is blue, etc.

So when you say "roll a d20 to hit" you can add on "that's the red one" to help a confused newbie. I've found that d20 and d12 are often confused. 

We had a set like that when I first learned to play.  They should definitly bring it back.
The boxed sets released for D&D have always had dice like this.

It's not that it's not a good idea; it's just that it's already a safe assumption that that is what they are going to do.
i don't think it's necessary. most people who play dnd are capable of differentiating between 7 distinct  die shapes.
i don't think it's necessary. most people who play dnd are capable of differentiating between 7 distinct  die shapes.


'Must resist... Must be polite... Be... nice...'

See title: Beginners

Let's make polyhedral dice available in every convenience store.
I agree that beginners would benefit from color-coded dice sets; which is why I always use the sets that came in my D&D boxed sets for beginners (they've almost always been color-coded sets).

On the other hand, I have a separate color-themed set of dice for each of my favorite PCs (I collect dice): a gray marblized granite-like set for my drawf, a green marblized set for my elf (until I buy another set of elven runes dice - I gave mine to my ex-DM/long-time D&D friend), transparent sparkling dice for my psionicist, etc.

They each have their own dice bags as well.

EDIT: And I'm in agreement with Wil Wheaton: touching another player's/DM's dice is taboo. You could jinx those things! 
A friend of mine used to keep his dice in the freezer until game time. "They roll better when they're cold," he said.


My daughter places poorly rolling dice into the freezer as punishment.
My daughter places poorly rolling dice into the freezer as punishment.

We do this, too. After the third or fourth bad roll, "Freezer time!" is often heard around the table. I think my daughter picked this up and is now spreading it to her gaming friends on base.

In memory of wrecan and his Unearthed Wrecana.

My daughter places poorly rolling dice into the freezer as punishment.

We do this, too. After the third or fourth bad roll, "Freezer time!" is often heard around the table. I think my daughter picked this up and is now spreading it to her gaming friends on base.

I have a special little burlap sack known as "the bad dice bag"  where underperforming dice are imprisoned for the remainder of the session.   It helps to encourage the other dice to roll better.
Ah-hah! New idea: Official WotC dice punishment boxes! Imprison your misbehaving d20s!
For bad dice there is only one fate. The killing jar. I put all the other dice around the jar so they can see their friend go to the happy rolling ground. No quarter for traitors.