Hey, kids!

A lot of the forum posts here reference gaming experience as a way of establishing cred (e.g. I've been gaming for 20 years and I started with AD&D), but I'm wondering how many teens or early twentysomethings are out there browsing these boards.  These are the players who are going to either take this hobby into the future or see it consigned to the "model train ghetto".

So, do you fit that demographic?

If so, what edition did you start with and what do you think of the current playtest?
 
3rd edition, and I think the playtest is trying too hard not to be like 4th edition, and doing itself a real disservice in the process. The advantage and disadvantage system is nice, although it's gettign a little overused, I'm liking combat supuriority, but then there's the gear system where's it's back to 3.5's set up of basic weapon and armor choices being mostly irrelevant at higher levels, but even more so since shields, dual weapons, and two handed weapons no longer have much impact, and the disunified spell system, I really preferred having spells and attacks using the same basic mechanics, the current system is gonna be a hot mess to scale to higher levels.
24, started with 3rd ed for a few years then move onto 4th.

Personally I'm in the opposite corner to rampant, I love the way the new playtest is going and I see the playtest as containing the main premise of 4th entirely, the game is a lot simpler, streamlined and once the maths is worked out I imagine balance and scaling will be great.

That balance is the 4e feature thats coming through but because its not a literal mechanic or written down system, people seem to think 4e is getting overlooked. Even if they CLEARLY arent there yet.

By the way... if you want more replies offer us candy and let us do this interview in your house, you can give us a ride in your van. 
A lot of the forum posts here reference gaming experience as a way of establishing cred (e.g. I've been gaming for 20 years and I started with AD&D), but I'm wondering how many teens or early twentysomethings are out there browsing these boards.  These are the players who are going to either take this hobby into the future or see it consigned to the "model train ghetto".

So, do you fit that demographic?

If so, what edition did you start with and what do you think of the current playtest?
 



I'm 24, I guess that's early 20-something. I started with 2e way back when I was 10 (my dad was a longtime D&D player and decided to get me into it.), so I dunno. I've been playing for over a decade, but I'm definitely not up there with the guys who are 50-60 years old and have been playing since red box. I'm also the youngest player in my current group by 2-3 years. I know I'm considered young among some of the longtimers, but to me it seems disappointing that it's so hard to get other people closer to my age or younger into the game. 

[Edit:  Re: Your actual question, right now I'm pretty disappointed in the playtest. I think that having a unique resource for every class is unsustainable and will end up with way too much rules bloat. 4e having everyone on the same system was bad, but this is the exact opposite extreme, a happy medium needs to be found. I'm also not really liking what we're seeing in terms of options available for Mundanes vs Magic, the options available to the mundane classes just feel much more limited in both scope and number, and every indication is that will get worse with higher levels being released. Also not a big fan of how gear is being handled, but gear in general is a personal interest of mine (I have extensive homebrew regarding gear and fighting styles for 3.5) and I'm not likely to be satisfied with a system simple enough to make it into core. I also think the concept of bounded accuracy is flawed and counter to every edition of D&D I've ever played, and the skill system is extremely boring, failing to provide any meaningful non-combat mechanics for anyone without spells.

I mean there are bits and pieces I like. The core mechanic of CS is decent, and advantage/disadvantage dice. But there are huge chunks of the game right now that run completely counter to what I want, and almost every article seems to be pushing itself further in that direction.]


As an aside, people who try to establish credibility with how long they've been playing are generally just wasting their own time in doing so. You can have someone who's been playing RPGs for 6 months who tried to inhale everything out there at once and has played a dozen different systems and knows the ins and outs of how the various games work and design in general.  On the other hand you can have the guy who's been playing for 40 years with the same group doing the same things, still using the same system. Out of these two fictional people, I'd be more interested in hearing the perspective of the new guy.
I'm 23, and I started with 3E.
I guarantee that I have a higher post count, more hours of game-play, more DM time, and more homebrew experience than a lot of the "I've been playing for 20 years and started with AD&D" crowd, not that any of that actually matters on its own.
The current playtest is okay, but it feels too needlessly retro for me in a lot of places, ignoring a lot of progress that's been made over the years, like going back to saving throws rather than just putting everybody on attack. I'm happy with some of the changes between the playtest packets, and they give me hope that the devs are listening, but the initial playtest is not something that I even wanted to playtest, and it still has a long way to go.

Why, yes, as a matter of fact I am the Unfailing Arbiter of All That Is Good Design (Even More So Than The Actual Developers) TM Speaking of things that were badly designed, please check out this thread for my Minotaur fix. What have the critics said, you ask? "If any of my players ask to play a Minotaur, I'm definitely offering this as an alternative to the official version." - EmpactWB "If I ever feel like playing a Minotaur I'll know where to look!" - Undrave "WoTC if you are reading this - please take this guy's advice." - Ferol_Debtor_of_Torm "Really full of win. A minotaur that is actually attractive for more than just melee classes." - Cpt_Micha Also, check out my recent GENASI variant! If you've ever wished that your Fire Genasi could actually set stuff on fire, your Water Genasi could actually swim, or your Wind Genasi could at least glide, then look no further. Finally, check out my OPTIONS FOR EVERYONE article, an effort to give unique support to the races that WotC keeps forgetting about. Includes new racial feature options for the Changeling, Deva, Githzerai, Gnoll, Gnome, Goliath, Half-Orc, Kalashtar, Minotaur, Shadar-Kai, Thri-Kreen, Warforged and more!
I am a member of the started in 1e or so group, but my 14yr old son he wanted to give mocking names to the 5e characters we were making, I think the first was called bob1. He started between editions with free form play... and moved on to 4e. He only comes here rarely. I think this is a model train yard.
  Creative Character Build Collection and The Magic of King's and Heros  also Can Martial Characters Fly? 

Improvisation in 4e: Fave 4E Improvisations - also Wrecans Guides to improvisation beyond page 42
The Non-combatant Adventurer (aka Princess build Warlord or LazyLord)
Reality is unrealistic - and even monkeys protest unfairness
Reflavoring the Fighter : The Wizard : The Swordmage - Creative Character Collection: Bloodwright (Darksun Character) 

At full hit points and still wounded to incapacitation? you are playing 1e.
By virtue of being a player your characters are the protagonists in a heroic fantasy game even at level one
"Wizards and Warriors need abilities with explicit effects for opposite reasons. With the wizard its because you need to create artificial limits on them, they have no natural ones and for the Warrior you need to grant permission to do awesome."

 

I'm 23, and I started with 3E.
I guarantee that I have a higher post count, more hours of game-play, more DM time, and more homebrew experience than a lot of the "I've been playing for 20 years and started with AD&D" crowd, not that any of that actually matters on its own.
The current playtest is okay, but it feels too needlessly retro for me in a lot of places, ignoring a lot of progress that's been made over the years, like going back to saving throws rather than just putting everybody on attack. I'm happy with some of the changes between the playtest packets, and they give me hope that the devs are listening, but the initial playtest is not something that I even wanted to playtest, and it still has a long way to go.


This made me laugh.

While I have to give you the post count, your other claims are amusing.

I've played for (+/-)20 more years than you; 80% of that in homebrew caimpaigns (50% of those as DM).

We also used to play from 8-10 AM Saturday through lunch on Sunday, on a regular basis for years (we were much younger then; would love to be able to do this still, but...alas). 

Thanks again for the chuckle! 
HEY, BOB!  (I take no one here is familiar with a Ren. Faire specialty, "Ded Bob")  21, near 22, and I started with 2nd Edition (specifically Planescape, Ravenloft, and Forgotten Realms).  Besides a few things here and there, nothing has really wowed me in the current playtest.  I felt like I've already seen it.  That's not a bad thing, but there's no surprise there.  I'm waiting for something new to shock and intrigue me.  I mean, I'll probably still buy 5E (So far, I like what I see), but I'd like it if something really caught me off guard and excited me to check out a little more.  Anyone know what I mean?  Also, I enjoy model trains quite a bit, thank you very much   As for the hobby as a whole?  My FLGS is confident with the progression of D&D.  Tons of people have been introduced to it within the county alone.  Some have stuck with it, some have left.  So, if that's some indication that the next generation of younger adult gamers are interested in D&D.

An undead spectre occasionally returning to remind the fandom of its grim existence.

 

 

Some good pointers for the fellow hobbyist!:

  • KEEP D&D ALIVE, END EDITION WARS!
  • RESPECT PEOPLES' PREFERENCES
  • JUST ENJOY THE GAME!
Im in the older bracket. I am almost 40, started playing when I was young 7-8 when the grownups had their DnD the kids had our own game. started playing with ADnD. then went back to the red box. then went to 2nd. then back to ADnD. then tried 3rd. Then went back to ADnD. Then tried 4th. Then went back to 2nd.

I have played all but 3.5. Have DM'd red box through 2nd.

I like quite a bit of what is happening with next it looks good so far.   
DMG pg 263 "No matter what a rule's source, a rule serves you, not the other way around."
I won't go into my "street cred" but one of our players is a teen that started a few months ago with 4e Encounters at the local FLGS. He recently volunteered that he really had fun making his D&Dn character and has enjoyed the first two play sessions more than the 4e Encounters sessions.


Also, I've occasionally been DMing D&Dn for my 16yr old son and his friends. They started with 4e encounters, dabbled in 3.5 and Pathfinder, but prefer D&Dn, at least so far... at least that's what they tell me.
This made me laugh.

While I have to give you the post count, your other claims are amusing.

Thanks again for the chuckle! 

Excuse you? This condescending tone is exactly why so many younger players resent older players as being out of touch grognards that need to get with the times. You have zero idea how much I play D&D, so you need to check yourself before taking that tone with me.

Why, yes, as a matter of fact I am the Unfailing Arbiter of All That Is Good Design (Even More So Than The Actual Developers) TM Speaking of things that were badly designed, please check out this thread for my Minotaur fix. What have the critics said, you ask? "If any of my players ask to play a Minotaur, I'm definitely offering this as an alternative to the official version." - EmpactWB "If I ever feel like playing a Minotaur I'll know where to look!" - Undrave "WoTC if you are reading this - please take this guy's advice." - Ferol_Debtor_of_Torm "Really full of win. A minotaur that is actually attractive for more than just melee classes." - Cpt_Micha Also, check out my recent GENASI variant! If you've ever wished that your Fire Genasi could actually set stuff on fire, your Water Genasi could actually swim, or your Wind Genasi could at least glide, then look no further. Finally, check out my OPTIONS FOR EVERYONE article, an effort to give unique support to the races that WotC keeps forgetting about. Includes new racial feature options for the Changeling, Deva, Githzerai, Gnoll, Gnome, Goliath, Half-Orc, Kalashtar, Minotaur, Shadar-Kai, Thri-Kreen, Warforged and more!
I'm 25. I started playing AD&D when I was 8 (17 years oh yeah). I don't like 5e that much. It seems needlessly complicated and too "old school" for me. I want each edition to build upon the last but this one seems to be a step backwards. 4e wasn't even my favorite RPG and it certainly had many flaws but at least the core rules were fast, simple, and effective. I need to see and play more 5e but so far it seems lacking. If I want something "old school" a retclone will do just fine. If I want a modern RPG though 5e is sadly lacking.
I'm 19, I started with 4e in the beginning of this year. We play weekly, and while we liked 4e for about 6 months, playing the playtest actually spoiled 4e for us. We see many of it's flaws, and I like Next so far a lot better. 

Keep in mind none of my group has any experience outside of 4e either, and the only experience I have outside of it is Baldur's Gate and Icewind Dale, so we don't see Next as a retroclone or going back to old ideas. We see it as a new product and a product that all of us really enjoy so far.
I probably don't fit into the asked for category, being 32.
However, while I have been playing RPGs and DMing since I was like 9-10 or so, I have not been playing D&D for that long a time.

I played some 2e AD&D for a short time during it's era but then returned to other RPGs.
We started playing D&D for real just around the 3 -> 3.5 e switch then we have been playing D&D and other RPGs alternately since then. When 4e came we wee quite sceptical but we still played it and we still do, although coming from a much more gritty and low-fantasy RPG background we find it quite jarring..

I appreicaite the 3e like appearance of 5e (as I liked 3e most of the editons I have played) and I feel like the developers are really trying this time to listen to the community, although perhaps they do it too much. I almost feel like they are so afraid of the community reaction that they can't really make the game they want to make..

Something I don't like at all in 5e is that every class has its own 'system'. I would rather see a few core systems that are used in slightly different ways and proportions by the different classes. I also really don't like the equipment lists and rules.

Something I do like is Vancian casting =P

As for the model trains...  I live in Sweden though so the situation might be very different but yea, in a way ttrpg is probably a dying hobby. Although there are a surprising amount of good new ttrpgs, and ttrpg companies here recently (some totally new and some ressurrections of old retro swedish rpgs) and I am constantly surprised to find younger groups of players in unexpected places, so maybe the situation is better than it seems at first glance.
D&D does not have high status among the RPGs here though.. (Oh you play RPG! What do you play? Oh.. D&D...  okay... )


This made me laugh.

While I have to give you the post count, your other claims are amusing.

Thanks again for the chuckle! 

Excuse you? This condescending tone is exactly why so many younger players resent older players as being out of touch grognards that need to get with the times. You have zero idea how much I play D&D, so you need to check yourself before taking that tone with me.



And you have zero idea how much those grognards you guaranteed you had more time playing, dming and homebrewing than had so if there was condescension in his post it only mirrored that in yours (personally I don't think there was any in his but thats just my opinion)

You came across as unnecessarily attacking older gamers here sir/maam- might want to tone it down some.



I am 26, most of the players i currently play with are on early 20s.  My first exposures to D&D were computer videogames, wish i found them to be horrendous to the point of avoiding all videogames that had dungeons and dragons brand on it, i bought neverwinter nights without knowing it was a dungeons and dragons game...i disliked it alot, because of the praise, i gave Neverwinter Nights 2 a chance because obsidian was formed mostly by trokia and blackisle developers, and they made 2 of my favorite computer rpg of all time, Arcanum & Fallout 2... i disliked Neverwinter Nights 2 too, but not as much as Neverwinter Nights 1, but it still had the things i couldn't stand.

I tried actual D&D by sugestion, 3.5 DM'd by a old D&D veteran that was the uncle of my best friend's girlfriend...i disliked it for the same reasons i disliked Neverwinter Nights 1 & 2, the game mechanics...then i bought KOTOR...as soon as i reached character creation, i noticed it was the same d20 system, i inmediatly uninstalled the game.  

I avoided playing 4e for a year because i had such a terrible impresion of anything D&D related, but i was "interested" on the person DMing, and because i heard my 3.5 DM hated 4e saying it wasn't D&D and was turned into a MMORPG...wish as a videogame player i call BS, because MMORPG isn't about game mechanics, it's about Masive Multiplayer, as i have played several MMORPGs during the years.

I gave 4e a try...because, "hey, if is no longer D&D, that means there is a chance is now a competent designed game" i liked it quite alot, because it removed most of what i disliked about all my former D&D exposure, i didn't found MMORPG aspects, just RPG aspects (character classes and roles) and also reminded me to Strategy RPG such as Tactics Ogre and Final Fantasy Tactics...so i was sold on game mechanics and character creation, RPing is not attached to game mechanics, so i had no problem with that.  Real life kept my former 4e D&D group to play, but i found online communnities and now i play on sunday as a player and i DM on friday a campaing.  

Because this is also a question for the younger players, the stance of my players for 5e is that there are very few good ideas....but for every each good idea from that, there are 10 bad ones,  we found it to be aimless and without a design goal at all, as it suppose to try to appeal to players of all editions...even thought the play style and taste from diferent edition players contradict each other...and the good ideas on the playtest are badly executed.  It seems to try to appeal for nostalgia for the sake of nostalgia sacrificing quality for the game design, the perfect description from us, is that D&DNext looks and feels extremly amateur, looks like a game you found for free on a forum or a wiki, not as a product you pay money for it...worst of all, there isn't anything new or exciting about it.  
So, I'm in my 30s and have been playing for the better part of 2 decades, both sides of the screen.
 Cut my teeth on AD&D 2nd. The interior of the cover had a nice bit of art with a party, a crate of treasure, and the sorta smallish dragon they had killed strung up on a tree. It reminded me of when my cousins came back from deer hunting and wanted a picture with dinner. I've got 3 groups. Two my own age...

One of my groups, however, is composed of gamers in their early twenties, late teens.  
Most got started in my L5R game. They have played 4E exclusively, as far as D&D is concerned. They had a WTFITS response to Essentials, which prompted me to drag out my 3E stuff so they could see where those ideas were coming from. Yeah... it was... interesting.
 
They are less than amused by DDN. 
"Why would I want to go from playing Lu Bu to playing some nameless mook?"
This is a Dynasty Warriors reference... a game they introduced me to after a long foreign policy rant.
 Anyway, back on task. They think the current PCs fold up like lawn chairs and wonder why, if there is a listed time for prayers or study, that they can't re-prepare their spells given sufficient time. They also wonder why Clerics cast spells.
At least two of them have told me not to bother them with future playtests, or that it will cost me the same as hiring any other test group. 
I have an answer for you, it may even be the truth.
I'm 24, I started playing with 3rd ed when I was 13 and I played/Dmed it until 4e came out. I happily switched to 4e because I like balance and the reduced workload on the DM.

I'm still on the fence about D&D Next: some things I like (character creation, the concept of combat superiority, the return of encounter powers for some classes/builds), some things I don't like (class balance is still off, monsters are boring, combat is very swingy).
39.  Started with the Dungeon board game when I was 10ish and moved on from there.  Played more homebrew/precentile style games/storyteller/etc in my teens, and then got into 2nd ed in my early 20's.  Late 20's to early 30's was the 3's, and then mid to late 30's was 4th.  While no edition was perfect, I enjoyed each one.  4th may have suffered more burn out more quickly due to its devergent playstyle from previous editions, or possibly because in this day and age, you know another edition is right around the corner.  (or maybe because my group was over an hour drive away ;) )

I am enjoying the heck out of five.  Granted, I'm not paying for 5, so that has a tremendous impact on how I feel about it.  I'm also playtesting with other people who are enthusiastic about 5th, which is really the key.  No matter what version or system of an RPG I've played, it all comes down to "how much fun is your DM/Player base combo".  With the 5th playtest, I am very fortunate to have some folks who are fun to play the game with. 
I'm in my late twenties, but I have not had the good fortune to have been playing since before I could walk, so I'm a sort of medium-term player despite my age. While I had a few casual encounters with D&D earlier, I didn't really start getting into it until college, smack-dab in 3.5's heyday. Thus while I'm not in the OP's target demographic, I'm not exactly accruing stacking bonuses to my mental stats just yet.

My opinion on the playtest so far is that it's fine. Honestly, what has reassurred me most about the playtest so far is not that it's super duper awesome or anything (although it's fine), but that a number of substantive changes made it into the second playtest, which indicates to me that they actually are willing to make adjustments to the system based on player feedback, and meaningful ones. Whether or not I like everything present in the current playtest actually means less to me than that the team seems reasonably responsive to what people are saying about the game. Obviously it's not possible to put out something that's the absolute perfect product in every single player's eyes, but it's cool that they're to some degree actually walking the walk when it comes to player feedback.

I wouldn't say that my group (most of which is similar to me demographically) loves the playtest, but it's just a playtest. (And some of the love gap is due to I think considerably reduced investment in the playtest compared to other campaigns they've been a part of.)
Dwarves invented beer so they could toast to their axes. Dwarves invented axes to kill people and take their beer. Swanmay Syndrome: Despite the percentages given in the Monster Manual, in reality 100% of groups of swans contain a Swanmay, because otherwise the DM would not have put any swans in the game.
You came across as unnecessarily attacking older gamers here sir/maam

No, I was responding the OP's notion that younger players can't have similar "cred" to what older players claim. That's why I added "not that any of that actually matters on its own" to the end of it. I've played with other players that started with AD&D but were absolutely awful and with DM's who've only been at it a couple of years but have masters the art of cooperative storytelling. Age does not automatically grant "cred" at this game.

Why, yes, as a matter of fact I am the Unfailing Arbiter of All That Is Good Design (Even More So Than The Actual Developers) TM Speaking of things that were badly designed, please check out this thread for my Minotaur fix. What have the critics said, you ask? "If any of my players ask to play a Minotaur, I'm definitely offering this as an alternative to the official version." - EmpactWB "If I ever feel like playing a Minotaur I'll know where to look!" - Undrave "WoTC if you are reading this - please take this guy's advice." - Ferol_Debtor_of_Torm "Really full of win. A minotaur that is actually attractive for more than just melee classes." - Cpt_Micha Also, check out my recent GENASI variant! If you've ever wished that your Fire Genasi could actually set stuff on fire, your Water Genasi could actually swim, or your Wind Genasi could at least glide, then look no further. Finally, check out my OPTIONS FOR EVERYONE article, an effort to give unique support to the races that WotC keeps forgetting about. Includes new racial feature options for the Changeling, Deva, Githzerai, Gnoll, Gnome, Goliath, Half-Orc, Kalashtar, Minotaur, Shadar-Kai, Thri-Kreen, Warforged and more!
As for myself:

I did have a tiny bit of exposure to D&D through my older brother around 15yrs old or so; however, he never invited me to play (so, I wasn't a gamer then). I actually got into the hobby in 2009 as I concluded my military service (gamers friends in the service wanted to keep track of me).

I played a session or two of 3.5e before the group split over making the leap to 4e. I leapt into 4e completely and began to collect all the published books (I'm only missing a few from the WotC published works in the edition). I started DMing in a homebrew world which stole mostly from FR (with a dash of Eberron).

During the past three years of gaming, I've DMed two homebrew campaigns from level 1 - 11 and numerous seasons of D&D Encounters. I've played in four 4e campaigns, one 2e campaign, and one 3.5 campaign as well as numerous sessions of D&D Encounters.

I'm far less involved in the forum and threads during the past six months as D&DNext has largely consumed the player-sphere. I have less interest in continuing D&D into the next iteration based on the current patterns illustrated in the play test materials. I've picked up interest in other games and editions (I'm particularly interested in 2e and Pathfinder, but currently without a group to play).

In the forum discussions about D&DNext, I feel like my voice isn't really heard; I don't get the impression anyone is responding. I especially don't feel my gaming interests are being showcased--or even really deeply considered--among the design team conversations.

While I recognize the future of the hobby rests on the shoulders of the young generation of gamers, I think it might be foolish to place more interest in their style of play than that of older, established gamers. There are a number of factors to consider. In light of the upcoming iteration, keep in mind that older gamers are more likely to share the hobby with children or grandchildren, establish schedules for games at private or public locations, mentor new DMs and players, and spend the money on new content.

While it may be true that the playstyle between older and newer gamers exhibits differences in stereotype, in detail, those differences are likely to be less contrasting. It is far better to lump all gamers (in the D&D community) together under one banner than to assume that new players are different than old players. The age itself doesn't dictate a different playstyle, nor a different marketing strategy. In addition, the designers can afford to take interest in an average playstyle with occasional forays into modules for outlying playstyles.

I am only a year over 30. It was half may lifetime ago that I was exposed to D&D (though not invited to participate), yet only 3 years ago I became a member of the community (and largely as a DM for most of my play experience). If D&DNext is somehow geared to target young demographics, how many other gamers (like myself) will have a reduced interest? On the other hand, if D&DNext is somehow geared to target a more mature demographic, how many young players will be exposed through older gamers?

Honestly, an established gamer will be far more successful at converting a new potential into a role-play hobbyist than a marketing camaign or a book sale.
It does amuse me the degree to which many of the arguments here can be condensed down to GET OFF MY LAWN
D&D Next = D&D: Quantum Edition
There is so much true and valuable knowledge in this thread. 

Young people vs. old people is so unique!

Oh - and Mand12 - GET OFF MY LAWN! 
You came across as unnecessarily attacking older gamers here sir/maam

No, I was responding the OP's notion that younger players can't have similar "cred" to what older players claim. That's why I added "not that any of that actually matters on its own" to the end of it. I've played with other players that started with AD&D but were absolutely awful and with DM's who've only been at it a couple of years but have masters the art of cooperative storytelling. Age does not automatically grant "cred" at this game.



Regardless of what you were trying to do thats not how you come across.
You came across as unnecessarily attacking older gamers here sir/maam

No, I was responding the OP's notion that younger players can't have similar "cred" to what older players claim. That's why I added "not that any of that actually matters on its own" to the end of it. I've played with other players that started with AD&D but were absolutely awful and with DM's who've only been at it a couple of years but have masters the art of cooperative storytelling. Age does not automatically grant "cred" at this game.



Regardless of what you were trying to do thats not how you come across.


Not really.
D&D Next = D&D: Quantum Edition
22, first game was 3.0 with my oldest brother and some of his work friends. First character was a bag-pipe playing bard. About 3 years ago I started a 4e game when I was an undergrad. We did that for a while before I got my hands on the 3.5 books and wanted to 'get back to my roots'. We have been playing 3.5 for about 2 years and we "love" it. Over the months of playing we have houseruled the system into a game that we really enjoy... and its mostly unrecognizable to players who actually know the rules. Besides that I run a Pathfinder game with some of my family, play and DM some nWoD and have created/am constantly working on the campaign setting we use for our games. I spend about 60% of my time behind the screen and 40% making really bad characters. As it turns out, im not a good player

I love Next so far, and will apparently be in the small group that really likes the unique mechanics for most of the classes. I don't want to see completely different mechanics for 40 different classes, but if we have 6 or so 'core' mechanics for about 12 classes that would be great. The groups im playtesting with (all grad or undergrad students) have all really enjoyed Backgrounds and Sub-class/races. We feel it will allow for every level of complexity in character creation. From "I want to hit stuff with an axe" to "I want a warrior slave who became an intellectual tactician and leader of his people before he took up the mantle of a shaman, becoming a dragon aspect."
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