Stifled Creativity

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Hello again, I'm not sure if this is really an issue, but it is something i'd like to discuss. A few of the group members have not ever really strayed from classes that they have used before, granted I'm all for famililarity, but I hae politely asked them to see about tryng a new class and seeing how it works for them,but they seem adamant about what they choose, so I let them stay as the same class. Yet with theses classes they pick the same powers, but change a feat or tow (Or a few different powers) I really would like to see them try other classes, is there anything I can do?
Hello again, I'm not sure if this is really an issue, but it is something i'd like to discuss. A few of the group members have not ever really strayed from classes that they have used before, granted I'm all for famililarity, but I hae politely asked them to see about tryng a new class and seeing how it works for them,but they seem adamant about what they choose, so I let them stay as the same class. Yet with theses classes they pick the same powers, but change a feat or tow (Or a few different powers) I really would like to see them try other classes, is there anything I can do?

This honestly sounds to me like a non-issue. People have favorites. If they're having fun, it shouldn't be a problem. However, next time it's time to roll up new chars, simply suggest trying something new. If they don't want to, let them have fun.
Okay thanks!
I really would like to see them try other classes, is there anything I can do?

Why?

My favorite flavor of ice cream is vanilla... just about any variation of vanilla, although vanilla bean tops the list. When we go to an ice cream store that has more than one flavor of ice cream, and vanilla is one of them, I *choose* vanilla. And I have a few friends who take pleasure in commenting on this every time it happens. They seem to want me to try another flavor. But I don't want to. And I see no point in them trying to get me to try another flavor. I *enjoy* vanilla ice cream.

If you have a few players who have a favorite race/class, let them enjoy it.
Here are the PHB essentia, in my opinion:
  • Three Basic Rules (p 11)
  • Power Types and Usage (p 54)
  • Skills (p178-179)
  • Feats (p 192)
  • Rest and Recovery (p 263)
  • All of Chapter 9 [Combat] (p 264-295)
A player needs to read the sections for building his or her character -- race, class, powers, feats, equipment, etc. But those are PC-specific. The above list is for everyone, regardless of the race or class or build or concept they are playing.
Okay I understand sorry
No need to apologize. Just try looking at it from another angle. Martin Scorsese has made a ton of mobster movies, often going back to the same themes over and over again... yet he's regarded as one of the great directors of our time. One can be "broadly" creative by spanning multiple genres (which in the world of professional artists is actually pretty rare) or they can be "deeply" creative by refining their themes continuously to get a better understanding of a core idea.

Now if when Bob the Fighter dies his player rolls up stats for Bob Jr. I might raise an eyebrow, but heck, if the guy is having fun at the table and contributing to my game, I'm happy to have him.
@ Kratos1810: Check my sig for the three things that I believe are on the GM's agenda. It simplifies the things I should care about. Everything else, including class choices, are not on that list so it's not part of my agenda. I like that list because it makes it easy to focus on what I need to do to make a good game.

@ Seeker95: C'mon, not even butter pecan? 

For any decision or adjudication, ask yourself, "Is this going to be fun for everyone?" and "Is this going to lead to the creation of an exciting, memorable story?"

DMs: Dungeon Master 101  |  Session Zero  |  Structure First, Story Last  |  No Myth Roleplaying  |  5e Monster Index & Encounter Calculator
Players: Players 101  |  11 Ways to Be a Better Roleplayer  |  You Are Not Your Character  |  Pre-Gen D&D 5e PCs

Content I Created: Adventure Scenarios  |  Actual Play Reports  |  Tools  |  Game Transcripts

Follow me on Twitter: @is3rith

Okay makes sense, I'll do it. Thanks all!
Now I want butter pecan ice cream.
Now if when Bob the Fighter dies his player rolls up stats for Bob Jr. I might raise an eyebrow



One guy in my group plays a Deva named Allonar. For those who aren't familiar with Devas, when they die, they reincarnate with very limited memories of their past lives. He's played different classes and personalities, but every character he's played in our longer campaigns has been an Allonar incarnation.
Depending on the campaign I'm running, I have made pointed suggestions about what kinds of characters would work best for the game, and have been known to restrict certain options depending on the scenario.   Players that disregard what I suggest may have a significantly harder time making it through the game, but generally speaking they are open to what I say, because they want to have the best time available.  You might also try convincing one of your players to run a game or two, as the game offers a far different perspective from behind the screen, as you well know. 
..."window.parent.tinyMCE.get('post_content').onLoad.dispatch();" contenteditable="true">but every character he's played in our longer campaigns has been an Allonar incarnation.

That is too cool by far!
Here are the PHB essentia, in my opinion:
  • Three Basic Rules (p 11)
  • Power Types and Usage (p 54)
  • Skills (p178-179)
  • Feats (p 192)
  • Rest and Recovery (p 263)
  • All of Chapter 9 [Combat] (p 264-295)
A player needs to read the sections for building his or her character -- race, class, powers, feats, equipment, etc. But those are PC-specific. The above list is for everyone, regardless of the race or class or build or concept they are playing.
It sounds like you're a player like me.  I don't think I've ever had a character who was the same as a previous character.  I think I did same class... once.  There's just too many cool options in 4E.

Some people just love one thing.  They met the Warden and they love him/her.  They love being the defender.  They love the Warden's skillset.  They love the powers.  They love how the class plays.

It's foreign to me, but it's not a "wrong" way to play.  

If you're getting bored of DMing for a group that's always the same, you might talk to an open minded player about it when they get a chance to roll a character.  Mention you're getting to know the strengths and weaknesses of their 'default party' really well, and it's harder to get your creative juices flowing, or something.  See what they do.  


Another suggestion?  Do a 1-shot, flashback style.  Let people see and play out a historic event for a session!  Give them all pregens that are different from what they normally do.  If they hate it, oh well, it's one session.  If they like it, well, who knows.

P.S.  The player who is always a Deva, reincarnating, sounds AWESOME.  Especially if he's changing classes and personalities, but always with echos of the past.  I dunno, that just tickles my fancy.
Yeah, it's been pretty interesting. He's played four versions of the character so far (although one was a semi-villain and did not have stats, not even monster stats), and is planning a fifth for the upcoming campaign. I think the one he's planning will be an Avenger, which was the very first class he played and probably his favorite. But it'll still be a different incarnation.
If you really want to force the issue, you could have some sort of 'body swap' magic happen for a session, where players swap character sheets, but retain their PCs personality.

It's a well used story tradition in movies/tv shows/books, and it gives them an opportunity to play with characters they normally wouldn't, in the context of a solvable problem as part of a normal adventure.

For one session they probably wouldn't mind, although be careful not to let characters die in such a scenario... that could be awkward and make players unhappy.
@ Seeker95: C'mon, not even butter pecan? 


Was that an Identity Crisis reference? If so, you're awesome.

(even if it wasn't, you're still awesome) ;) 
(even if it wasn't, you're still awesome) ;) 



Woohoo, still awesome!

For any decision or adjudication, ask yourself, "Is this going to be fun for everyone?" and "Is this going to lead to the creation of an exciting, memorable story?"

DMs: Dungeon Master 101  |  Session Zero  |  Structure First, Story Last  |  No Myth Roleplaying  |  5e Monster Index & Encounter Calculator
Players: Players 101  |  11 Ways to Be a Better Roleplayer  |  You Are Not Your Character  |  Pre-Gen D&D 5e PCs

Content I Created: Adventure Scenarios  |  Actual Play Reports  |  Tools  |  Game Transcripts

Follow me on Twitter: @is3rith

I agree with the other posters when they say you should let the players choose what they want.

However, I have had some success with this method:   tell your players you're running a one-night (or two-night) adventure that's not part of the campaign.   Have it be a significant number of levels different (above or below) whatever levels their mains are.   For that adventure, pre-generate the characters, choosing classes that are all different from their current ones.

At the start of that adventure, let them each choose one of the pre-gens you made, and play that character.   Once they get a taste of something different, they may well be encouraged to try it themselves.   It has worked for me.
If you really want to force the issue, you could have some sort of 'body swap' magic happen for a session, where players swap character sheets, but retain their PCs personality.

It's a well used story tradition in movies/tv shows/books, and it gives them an opportunity to play with characters they normally wouldn't, in the context of a solvable problem as part of a normal adventure.

For one session they probably wouldn't mind, although be careful not to let characters die in such a scenario... that could be awkward and make players unhappy.



You could also go the Fantastic Four route, put them in a magical effect that lets them "swap" equal level powers, like a daily for a daily or an encounter for an encounter. See what kind of weird combos they come up with.

And I do understand the DM wanting to see the players change things up a bit. My players had a pretty solid group, and when a new player came in I suggested she play a Controller since the group had never had one. The first encounter where she started unleasing effects that helped control the battlefield and move enemies around, all of the other players were like "Whoa! What was THAT???" All they'd played was Strikers and Defenders. A whole new world opened before them.
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