Calm Barbarian?

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Hello and welcome to my first post!

I have made a barbarian in Dungeons and Dragons and I made him calm. I took away 2 skill points to give him literacy therefore not making him dumb as nails. Now this is where I'm confused. I made him a calm and quiet barbarian, which I'm trying to figure out how that will work. I'll either need to find a way to change his attitude during battle, or to change his rage ability to something maybe similar to the Deadly Calm ability from World of Warcraft. If someone could give me some ideas that would be awesome.

I am playing 3.5e

Thank you and happy Roleplaying.
Just roleplay it like that.  Nothing says you have to spaz out and rant and rave and spit all over yourself when you activate the Rage ability.  Just re-name it to Deadly Calm and RP it like that, you're set.

See also:
tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/Tran...
Another day, another three or four entries to my Ignore List.

Here is an alternative class feature you can use. Swap it out for rage, and whenever rage improves so does it, in the same way.


Deadly Calm

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A barbarian can enter a state of Deadly Calm a certain number of times per day. While Calm, a barbarian temporarily gains a +4 bonus to Strength, a +4 bonus to Constitution, and a +2 morale bonus on Will saves, but he takes a -2 penalty to Armor Class. The increase in Constitution increases the barbarian’s hit points by 2 points per level, but these hit points go away at the end of the Deadly Calm when his Constitution score drops back to normal. (These extra hit points are not lost first the way temporary hit points are.) While Calm, a barbarian cannot use any Charisma-, Dexterity-, or Intelligence-based skills (except for Balance, Escape Artist, Intimidate, and Ride), the Concentration skill, or any abilities that require extended mental focus, nor can he cast spells or activate magic items that require a command word, a spell trigger (such as a wand), or spell completion (such as a scroll) to function. This is due to his focus on the battle at hand. He can use any feat he has except Combat Expertise, item creation feats, and metamagic feats. Deadly Calm lasts for a number of rounds equal to 3 + the character’s (newly improved) Constitution modifier. A barbarian may prematurely end his Calm. When Deadly Calm ends, the barbarian loses the modifiers and restrictions and becomes fatigued (-2 penalty to Strength, -2 penalty to Dexterity, can’t charge or run) for the duration of the current encounter (unless he is a 17th-level barbarian, at which point this limitation no longer applies). 

 A barbarian can enter a Deadly Calm only once per encounter. At 1st level he can use his Deadly Calm ability once per day. At 4th level and every four levels thereafter, he can use it one additional time per day (to a maximum of six times per day at 20th level). Becoming Deadly Calm takes no time itself, but a barbarian can do it only during his action, not in response to someone else’s action.

"In a way, you are worse than Krusk"                               " As usual, Krusk comments with assuredness, but lacks the clarity and awareness of what he's talking about"

"Can't say enough how much I agree with Krusk"        "Wow, thank you very much"

"Your advice is the worst"


 Your rage state is a set of game statistics. You get them by triggering your class feature. How you choose to portray that is entirely a narrative choice.
 It could be your tribe's war dance, putting yourself into some sort of battle trance, mind-over-body discipline, or using some natural herbal potion known only to your tribe to physically enhance yourself.
Hell, I used to have a guy named Feargol the Fearless who was so afraid of being thought a coward that he'd have a complete emotional breakdown and run screaming incoherently into battle.

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I am the Magic Man.

(Pay no attention to the man behind the curtain.)

 

I am the Lawnmower Man.

(I AM GOD HERE!)

 

I am the Skull God.

(Koo Koo Ka Choo)

 

There are reasons they call me Mad...

While there is a tendancy to theme "beserkers" as crazed, half hung, madmen, there is also a common portrayal of them as calm, rational and even intelectual individuals as well. When in battle they might go into a rage, but outside of battle they are calm, rational and even gentle creatures. Raging is a technique they use in battle, not a way of life.  Stern from Dragon Age is an example of this. Even the Hulk, the ultimate rager, is a peace loving scientist.
  
There should be absolutely nothing stopping you from playing your barbarian how you want. As long as it doesn't go against the mechanics, what's the problem?

'Rage' could very well be your character becoming completely emotionless, tuning out all thoughts and becoming completely, utterly focused on the battle at hand. Nothing else exists for him: There is only himself, his enemy and the next sword strike.

Just bring it up to DM and ask if it's okay. A decent DM should be open to reflavoring powers and features. At least, that's my opinion: As long as a player isn't gaining a mechanical benefit beyond what another member of the class would, there rarely a reason not to allow it. D&D is a game that requires imagination, after all, so discouraging imagination just seems... wrong to me.
Gunmage, a homebrew arcane striker. (Heroic Tier playtest ready.) GDocs link. (More up to date.)
You can also rp him as strong stoic character that seems himself as guardian of an individual or of the group.
There should be absolutely nothing stopping you from playing your barbarian how you want. As long as it doesn't go against the mechanics, what's the problem?

'Rage' could very well be your character becoming completely emotionless, tuning out all thoughts and becoming completely, utterly focused on the battle at hand. Nothing else exists for him: There is only himself, his enemy and the next sword strike.

Just bring it up to DM and ask if it's okay. A decent DM should be open to reflavoring powers and features. At least, that's my opinion: As long as a player isn't gaining a mechanical benefit beyond what another member of the class would, there rarely a reason not to allow it. D&D is a game that requires imagination, after all, so discouraging imagination just seems... wrong to me.

Quiet anger is often the fire that burns hottest.
A rogue with a bowl of slop can be a controller. WIZARD PC: Can I substitute Celestial Roc Guano for my fireball spells? DM: Awesome. Yes. When in doubt, take action.... that's generally the best course. Even Sun Tsu knew that, and he didn't have internets.
Quiet anger is often the fire that burns hottest.


Speaking as someone who spent quite a few years rarely speaking - or being able to speak - more than two sentences a day, this is true.

But back on the topic of barbarians: Silence (or quiet, at least) on a battle is disconcerting. It's almost inhuman not to roar and scream in combat. Now, imagine the barbarian - a strong, skilled, resilient warrior - silently marching towards you when, all around, soldiers are screaming for blood. He doesn't make a show of it, he just stares at you, marching towards you, unflinching. Soldiers clash all around him, but all he cares about is you.

That feeling? That feeling is why a calm barbarian should be allowed.

It's not the same as a screaming, psychotic barbarian who ignores wounds through adrenaline, but it accomplishes the same thing.



That and it's just so darn fun.
Gunmage, a homebrew arcane striker. (Heroic Tier playtest ready.) GDocs link. (More up to date.)
Quiet anger is often the fire that burns hottest.


Speaking as someone who spent quite a few years rarely speaking - or being able to speak - more than two sentences a day, this is true.

But back on the topic of barbarians: Silence (or quiet, at least) on a battle is disconcerting. It's almost inhuman not to roar and scream in combat. Now, imagine the barbarian - a strong, skilled, resilient warrior - silently marching towards you when, all around, soldiers are screaming for blood. He doesn't make a show of it, he just stares at you, marching towards you, unflinching. Soldiers clash all around him, but all he cares about is you.

That feeling? That feeling is why a calm barbarian should be allowed.

It's not the same as a screaming, psychotic barbarian who ignores wounds through adrenaline, but it accomplishes the same thing.



That and it's just so darn fun.

Yep. And actions speak louder than words. Sealed
A rogue with a bowl of slop can be a controller. WIZARD PC: Can I substitute Celestial Roc Guano for my fireball spells? DM: Awesome. Yes. When in doubt, take action.... that's generally the best course. Even Sun Tsu knew that, and he didn't have internets.
I remember in the anime, Record of Lodoss War, the party encountered a berserker.  All of his emotions other than rage were deadened, so he was normally calm...until you made him angry, of course.  Wink
"You can always judge a man by the quality of his enemies." -The Doctor, Remembrance of the Daleks
I thought Orison was a Bar-Sar-Kar when I watched the show.
The sea looks at the stabillity of the mountian and sighs. The mountian watches the freedom of the sea and cries.
I remember in the anime, Record of Lodoss War, the party encountered a berserker.  All of his emotions other than rage were deadened, so he was normally calm...until you made him angry, of course.  Wink



Which doesn't really apply much here, does it?  The point is that the character doesn't become a raging spastic berserker.
Another day, another three or four entries to my Ignore List.
Actually he needed a way to explain how his character switched from calm intelect to raging madman, or an alternative to the raging madman.


I would point out that the Hulk was really Bruce Banner, a super genius who was (if not The) among the most brilliant inteligent people on the planet.

But other then that the nature of the "rage" isn't described, just the results. So much fluff can be used. Think of the Born Identity person, or the sleeper agent, who when responding to a set stimuli becomes a remorceless, efficent fighting machine, ussually calm, cold and cool.
just an idea.  If i remember correctly, in the 3.5 book "Unearthed Arcana" (the book with variants on 3.5 ideas, some broken, some underpowered, some fine), there is an option for variant barbarian rage.  I BELIEVE its called Whirling Frenzy, though i haven't even peeked at that book in over 4 years, so i may be wrong.

I'm pretty sure it boosts strength and AC, while leaving hit points and constitution the same.  It might be a great option, if your DM will allow it, to choose instead in order to flavor as a "Deadly Calm" if a lower AC and increased hit points don't feel like the flavor you want.  (in my own opinion, increased hit chance, damage, and defenses seem more indicative of something titled "deadly calm")


.....or you can just ask him to reduce the rage cost on heroic strike and cleave by 10 for 15 seconds Tongue Out 
As the UA book is in the SRD, it can be linked.  

www.d20srd.org/

I can't see where the Whirling Frenzy variant is found, but I can recall seeing it somewhere...I'll search in a second. 
found it....last column, near the top, Class Feature Variants
Fair enough...thanks
You could easily theme your barbarian as being filled with the power and force of....your ancestors....primal spirits or any such thing like that..  You gain the regular benefits of the " rage" while not losing your mind as per typical berserkers but stillfatigued from the fact that now you don't have the power running through you anymore 
Another alternative is that the "rage" is a focused state of heightened offensive battle-awareness.  The character could have learned how to achieve this state over the course of months or years of rigorous training, discipline and meditation.

During this state, your heightened awareness means you strike more often and more effectively, which is reflected in the increase to STR.  You are also able to sustain combat for longer and shrug off more injuries, as relfected by the increase in CON, since hit points are a metagame concept anyway, and do not necessarily reflect actual wounds.  The increase to Will saves is a reflection of how difficult it is for anything to deter you from your focus in this state.  And the loss of AC goes with that, since you are so focused on offense, your ability to avoid incoming attacks suffers.  Of course, entering the state is physically and mentally demanding, hence his limitation on number of times per day.
I created an NPC for one of my Pathfinder games that was a semi-pacifist half-orc scribe who just happened to be a barbarian. I gave him a funny quirk that fit his peaceful personality perfect I thought: He always went last in initiative in the first round of combat because he had to take off and put away his glasses before raging and drawing his greatsword. It turned out great. He usually proceeded to finish off anything moving that survived my wife's (Gold, divine level one) Dragonblooded Elf Sorceress' onslaught (He had the pathfinder version of Power Attack Cleave and Great Cleave) apologizing the whole time. To make matters worse for his opponents, by this time he got to them, they were usually on fire (99% of her spells were flame based).

Imagine an almost seven foot tall half-orc running around a scorched battlefield apologing to people as he's cutting down four or five at a time all the while they are burnt to a crisp from a sorceress' best shot (she was like level 15 at the time). Most of the fights didn't last one combat round. Hell, the group slaughtered Lloth's avatar (which was supposed to be a damned challenge) in less than thirty seconds, and I made the damned thing immune to fire.


out
You could easily theme your barbarian as being filled with the power and force of....your ancestors....primal spirits or any such thing like that..  You gain the regular benefits of the " rage" while not losing your mind as per typical berserkers but stillfatigued from the fact that now you don't have the power running through you anymore 

I was a bit skeptic. Then I read this. Me likey.
A rogue with a bowl of slop can be a controller. WIZARD PC: Can I substitute Celestial Roc Guano for my fireball spells? DM: Awesome. Yes. When in doubt, take action.... that's generally the best course. Even Sun Tsu knew that, and he didn't have internets.