Players Looting EVERYTHING among other things.

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Is this a bad thing? Like they'll loot a mutant dog's corpse and try to turn it's paws into gloves, and they'll roll perception in an empty field and then pick the flowers. I have a rogue that takes every turn to try to steal somthing from somebody, i've started making up random crap for him to get. I had a guy who cut off a Goblin's hands to use for a later. They also love making perception checks at the strangest time, and they expect a simple perception check to reveal all the secrets of a room, though I feel as if that's something I can fix some how.  Any thoughts? My main concern is the Players looting everything, it slows things down and they leave ever single room empty. (Plus they do werid things like take the head of a Goblin and gutting it, then making the Halfling wear it to try and fool the goblin guards.)
Use leading questions to have them help come up with details.

"What does he have on him?"
"A few odds and ends and a memento of value only to him. What is it?"

"What do we see?"
"The typical furnishings of a nobleman's bedchambers. Such as?"

If I have to ask the GM for it, then I don't want it.

Use leading questions to have them help come up with details.

"What does he have on him?"
"A few odds and ends and a memento of value only to him. What is it?"

"What do we see?"
"The typical furnishings of a nobleman's bedchambers. Such as?"



That sounds good, but they'll say, "Heck if I know! You're the DM, you tell us!"
 
Use leading questions to have them help come up with details.

"What does he have on him?"
"A few odds and ends and a memento of value only to him. What is it?"

"What do we see?"
"The typical furnishings of a nobleman's bedchambers. Such as?"



That sounds good, but they'll say, "Heck if I know! You're the DM, you tell us!"
 



"Then, obviously, there's nothing of interest here.  Moving on ..."
Another day, another three or four entries to my Ignore List.
That'll end well.

"What do we see? Piles of Gold! Magic Items! Wenches!"
Use leading questions to have them help come up with details.

"What does he have on him?"
"A few odds and ends and a memento of value only to him. What is it?"

"What do we see?"
"The typical furnishings of a nobleman's bedchambers. Such as?"



That sounds good, but they'll say, "Heck if I know! You're the DM, you tell us!"
 



I have similar players....well, actually, if they didn't say that, they'd start giving themselves game breaking powers.

Anyway, to deal with this (my players do this stuff too, if only to try and sell it off), make the crap they find really worthless. If they try to use it later, have it backfire massively on them.  Or, even better, start assigning weight to things. Remember, they can only carry so much. At some point, they're going to have to pick and choose. And if something hasn't been particularly useful, they'll likely drop it.

Otherwise, if it slows the game down too much, just have a discussion with them about it. There's no need to stifle creativity (like with the goblin head thing), but trying to loot the 5th old worn leather boot in a row that only nets a few copper on the market is largely a waste of time and they need to know it. They're adventurers, they should have bigger fish to fry. 
My username should actually read: Lunar Savage (damn you WotC!) *Tips top hat, adjusts monocle, and walks away with cane* and yes, that IS Mr. Peanut laying unconscious on the curb. http://asylumjournals.tumblr.com/
Also, cursed items. Cursed items will make them think twice about taking everything in sight.
My username should actually read: Lunar Savage (damn you WotC!) *Tips top hat, adjusts monocle, and walks away with cane* and yes, that IS Mr. Peanut laying unconscious on the curb. http://asylumjournals.tumblr.com/
Also, cursed items. Cursed items will make them think twice about taking everything in sight.




I love you, also I should try that.
Also, on perception checks, have'em fail a few. Then stumble across something as they try to leave, like a trap.

They'll learn a passive/simple check isn't enough. Also, if they become paranoid about it and spend too much time exploring/searching an area, start having random encounters drop in on them. When they've fought their fifth random monster for the day walking around the area, they're going to get tired and either speed up the process or wondering wtf is going on. If the latter, it may be time to just have a nice chat with them about what they're doing. 
My username should actually read: Lunar Savage (damn you WotC!) *Tips top hat, adjusts monocle, and walks away with cane* and yes, that IS Mr. Peanut laying unconscious on the curb. http://asylumjournals.tumblr.com/
Also, cursed items. Cursed items will make them think twice about taking everything in sight.




I love you, also I should try that.



:D glad I could help.

Oh, and for things like chopped off body parts, I'd imagine they have a horrible or putrid stench that might require fortitude saves to try and use...especially a gutted out goblin head. blech. >.< 
My username should actually read: Lunar Savage (damn you WotC!) *Tips top hat, adjusts monocle, and walks away with cane* and yes, that IS Mr. Peanut laying unconscious on the curb. http://asylumjournals.tumblr.com/
He wore it... >,> Uh, are there any examples of cursed items already in 4e?
That'll end well.

"What do we see? Piles of Gold! Magic Items! Wenches!"

Leading questions. Not just "What do you see?"

But if they do that, then that's clearly the kind of game they want. Roll with it for a while, until they get tired of it.

If I have to ask the GM for it, then I don't want it.

He wore it... >,> Uh, are there any examples of cursed items already in 4e?



What in the...

YOU'RE RUNNING A SESSION RIGHT NOW!!?! XD

No idea, I don't play 4e. lmfao

Random curse off the top of my head:

All precious metals in the wearer's possession slowly dissolve/degrade until non-existant or rusted beyond belief. This includes gold and any metal based weapons and/or armor. Must make a will save to remove cursed item, otherwise it stays on for 1d3 hours. Each hour, dissolving/degrading gets worse.

I'll let you determine how the items become damaged.
My username should actually read: Lunar Savage (damn you WotC!) *Tips top hat, adjusts monocle, and walks away with cane* and yes, that IS Mr. Peanut laying unconscious on the curb. http://asylumjournals.tumblr.com/
That'll end well.

"What do we see? Piles of Gold! Magic Items! Wenches!"

Leading questions. Not just "What do you see?"

But if they do that, then that's clearly the kind of game they want. Roll with it for a while, until they get tired of it.



The players will never get tired of having silly amounts of infinite power. Which leads to boring games.
My username should actually read: Lunar Savage (damn you WotC!) *Tips top hat, adjusts monocle, and walks away with cane* and yes, that IS Mr. Peanut laying unconscious on the curb. http://asylumjournals.tumblr.com/
He wore it... >,> Uh, are there any examples of cursed items already in 4e?



What in the...

YOU'RE RUNNING A SESSION RIGHT NOW!!?! XD

No idea, I don't play 4e. lmfao

Random curse off the top of my head:

All precious metals in the wearer's possession slowly dissolve/degrade until non-existant or rusted beyond belief. This includes gold and any metal based weapons and/or armor. Must make a will save to remove cursed item, otherwise it stays on for 1d3 hours. Each hour, dissolving/degrading gets worse.

I'll let you determine how the items become damaged.



No, not at all, I guess "He had woren it" Would make mor sense.

Heh, and that item could work really well it'll ruin all the stuff they worked so lazily to get.

I had a guy who cut off a Goblin's hands to use for a later.

(Plus they do werid things like take the head of a Goblin and gutting it, then making the Halfling wear it to try and fool the goblin guards.)



Ah the psychotic utilitarian PCs. I'm pretty sure that every DM has run across this crew at least once (maybe more than once if you're really unlucky).

The first solution is to be a stickler for encumberance rules. They will start to reconsider that 18th suit of rusty chainmail when they are crawling through encounters. If you haven't been enforcing this before, start now. What bags are they putting the loot in? Do they leave it at a camp? How do they distribute it? Are they getting significant penalties to their Stealth and Thievery checks and being assaulted with surprise rounds because they sound like a gigantic bag of loose change being shaken throughout the dungeon?

If they're being really weird (like the bodypart harvesting you describe) harness the power of the persistent environment against them. Do wandering monsters attack them when they spend an hour scouring the floors of a 10x10 room? How does the local clergy feel about the guys who carry around satchels of goblin parts? How does the neighboring goblin tribe feel about it? If they are behaving in a way that would raise an eyebrow for breaking social norms (even crazy fantasy social norms) be sure to have them feel the consequences for it.

Honestly, most of these problems are self-correcting.

Is this a bad thing? Like they'll loot a mutant dog's corpse and try to turn it's paws into gloves



Processing skins and furs takes specialized equipment, facilities, and time.  And if not properly process, your player's newly crafted gloves will quickly rot.  So unless your player's are willing to put in the proper resources, or at least pay an NPC to do it, just like them incur the natural consequences of their actions.

and they'll roll perception in an empty field and then pick the flowers.


Is there anything hidden or of interest for a perception check to find?  No?  Then they find nothing. 

It's that simple. 

You don't have to spontaneously create something just because your players decided to randomly throw some dice for no good reason.  And if you constantly reward them when they do so, you're only going to reinforce that response in the future.  Pavlov's dogs come to mind.

I have a rogue that takes every turn to try to steal somthing from somebody, i've started making up random crap for him to get.


Your standard commoner will only have a few coppers to their name and maybe a item or two of personal importance.  Which will not likely be worth it when a) he's noticed and reported to the guard, b) the string of burglaries are eventually tied to him, c) he steals from the wrong person, or d) all of the above.  But it does give you some good DM'ing fodder.

I had a guy who cut off a Goblin's hands to use for a later.


See above.

They also love making perception checks at the strangest time, and they expect a simple perception check to reveal all the secrets of a room, though I feel as if that's something I can fix some how.


A common houserule is that perception checks only apply to the task you declare yourself doing.  If you simply walk into a room and make a perception check then, at best, we assume you're just giving the room a look-over.  You might learn something unusual about the general layout of the room or see something that's hidden in plan sight, assuming there's something to notice.  But you will not find, for example, the hidden switch under the bed, which would require your character to be described as actively moving items, checking out the scenery, and otherwise giving the room a through search

The idea is that this method requires the players to invest a little of both cognitive effort and roleplaying into what they are doing.

Any thoughts? My main concern is the Players looting everything, it slows things down and they leave ever single room empty.



For one, you could express this concern your players this and ask them to stop looting so much.  Tell them what you just told us.  That it's slowing the game down.  They may not even be aware that it's bothering you.  Often, problems like these can be quickly resolved with communication.

Two, do the above.  No, really.  Don't skip this step.

Three, enforce encumbrance.  If they want to lift everything in the room, they're going to need find a way to carry it all.

Four, most of the stuff in a standard dungeion is not going to be valuable anyway.  And unless you are dealing with gems, art objects, or magical items, anything that does have a bit of value is going to be hard to sell.  Who, really, is going to want to buy some 4th-rate, bloody, smell, uriney(?) goblin tatters that barely counts as armor, or their chipped and rusty weapons?  No one.  And sure, maybe someone might want to buy that table and stool set.  Not any self-respecting shop save or a 2nd-hand shop.  Maybe.  So finding one that will might take a couple of days.  Or you could have a yard sale.  Those always work, right?

And after a few days of playing Thrift Stores & Tuppence with only a few dozen coppers to show for it (if that much), your players might want to actually get back to adventuring.

Or maybe they'll open a shop.  In which case, there's actually loads of adventure opportunities that can revolve around owning a business.  Either way, you win.

(Plus they do werid things like take the head of a Goblin and gutting it, then making the Halfling wear it to try and fool the goblin guards.)


O...kay...?  Not only would a halfling's head not fit inside the skull of a goblin, but it would also be extremely obvious that the halfling is wearing the desecrated head of a rotting corpse.  At best, the halfling would horrify the guards.  Though most likely, his "clever disguise" would only make the goblin guards kill him harder.

Thinking about creating a race for 4e? Make things a lil' easier on yourself by reading my Race Mechanic Creation Guide first.
I think he means that they removed the skull and it's contents and they had the goblin wear the skin and top layers.  Think Silence of the Lambs.  

When I was stuck without my weapon, I ripped off an ogre's testicles and sack and used it as a makeshift club. You do what you gotta do, that's Dol's (that character's name) motto !
"Non nobis Domine Sed nomini tuo da gloriam" "I wish for death not because I want to die, but because I seek the war eternal"

IMAGE(http://www.nodiatis.com/pub/19.jpg)

There's a reason why 4th edition source books recommend that non-magical equipment not be saleable.
Set a time limit for quest or missions. If tey do a simple perception check it's not like they're looking for hidden items or secret doors. Let them know that they might notice something out of the ordinary if they pass the check but a careful searching will take time.

Sticking to the encumberance rule is also a great way of dumping items. Plus they probably have limited space. Having severer limbs mixed into theit rations seems unsanitary.
That'll end well.

"What do we see? Piles of Gold! Magic Items! Wenches!"



What would be wrong with giving them what adventurers want?

No amount of tips, tricks, or gimmicks will ever be better than simply talking directly to your fellow players to resolve your issues.
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What would be wrong with giving them what adventurers want?



I think the issue is "What adventuers want" versus "What players want". I assume that all other things remaining equal, fantasy world adventurers want to be rich, famous and armed to the teeth. If this is all that the players want then they should play a game where the PCs are gun-toting venture capitalists, not D&D. The trouble is the difference between what I say I want and what I actually want. When I say "I want a powerful magic sword", what I probably really mean is "I want my character to feel competent and menacing in combat". Maybe the kleptomaniac party really wants a huge dungeon delve for some great lost treasure. At the end of the day what they really want is to participate in exciting adventures, and apparently they think stripping a place clean is great fun.
If this is all that the players want then they should play a game where the PCs are gun-toting venture capitalists, not D&D.



Given the game is rooted firmly in the notion of breaking into the lairs of monsters, killing them, and taking their gold, I'm not sure what you mean.

The trouble is the difference between what I say I want and what I actually want.



The DM can't control any of that. If the players don't know what they want or aren't clear about it, then it's the fault of the players, not the DM. Players need to be direct so that the DM can prepare content they'll enjoy. If they really enjoy doing mundane things like this and the DM's okay with it, then there isn't a problem.

No amount of tips, tricks, or gimmicks will ever be better than simply talking directly to your fellow players to resolve your issues.
DMs: Dungeon Master 101  |  Find Your GM Style  |  Structure First, Story Last  |  No Myth Roleplaying  |  5e Monster Index & Encounter Calculator
Players: Players 101  |  11 Ways to Be a Better Roleplayer  |  You Are Not Your Character  |  Pre-Gen D&D 5e PCs

Content I Created: Adventure Scenarios  |  Actual Play Reports  |  Tools

I'm Recruiting Players for a D&D 5e Game: Interested?  |  Follow me on Twitter: @is3rith



Given the game is rooted firmly in the notion of breaking into the lairs of monsters, killing them, and taking their gold, I'm not sure what you mean.

 If the players don't know what they want or aren't clear about it, then it's the fault of the players, not the DM. Players need to be direct so that the DM can prepare content they'll enjoy. If they really enjoy doing mundane things like this and the DM's okay with it, then there isn't a problem.



I wasn't very clear in my reasoning on the first point, but the gist of it is that the players sit down at the table expecting some sort of challenge, not to stroll effortlessly from victory to victory (though I suppose if that's what they want and the DM is having fun, who am I to naysay them).

In regards to communication I agree that it is important, but if it was easy then there wouldn't be such a market in for marriage counselors and therapists. I am sure many are familiar with the table where there is a vague feeling of dissatisfaction in the air, but everyone is too polite to bring it up and hey, they still play (if only because there wasn't anything good on TV that day anyway). Since the DM is the one preparing the content, he or she does have the responsibility of asking players what they want. If this is what they want, then sure, no problem. But if what they really want is a madcap adventure game featuring comedic action and unscrupulous anti-heroes, that is something that should be aired at the table. Granted all of that is Session Zero stuff, but if you skipped that step or missed something important in the set-up then it's better to do a course correction early than perform a post-mortem when your players get bored or you get frustrated and the group falls apart.
I'd just ask them to tone it down a bit. If you want mechanics, see below.



  • You could consider bringing in a carrying capacity rule. 

  • You could also have the thief caught and run the guards/people seeing him as you realistically expect them to react. Better yet, A public example of a thief who was caught. Nothing stops a PC thief from pickpocketing every stupid little thing like seeing some guys getting their hands cut off and foreheads branded.  

  • I wouldn't do cursed things, or trapped things though. Thats just punishing the players for being interested in the world, which is something most DMs have a hard time getting.

"In a way, you are worse than Krusk"                               " As usual, Krusk comments with assuredness, but lacks the clarity and awareness of what he's talking about"

"Can't say enough how much I agree with Krusk"        "Wow, thank you very much"

"Your advice is the worst"                                                  "I'd recommend no one listed to Krusk's opinions about what games to play"

I wouldn't do cursed things, or trapped things though. Thats just punishing the players for being interested in the world, which is something most DMs have a hard time getting.



+1. If you're going to put cursed items in your game, fashion it such that the PCs need the cursed item for some greater purpose and dealing with having it on their person is part of the cost of fulfilling that great purpose. Otherwise, you're just asking for them to be paranoid about everything going forward. That's no way to play IMO.

No amount of tips, tricks, or gimmicks will ever be better than simply talking directly to your fellow players to resolve your issues.
DMs: Dungeon Master 101  |  Find Your GM Style  |  Structure First, Story Last  |  No Myth Roleplaying  |  5e Monster Index & Encounter Calculator
Players: Players 101  |  11 Ways to Be a Better Roleplayer  |  You Are Not Your Character  |  Pre-Gen D&D 5e PCs

Content I Created: Adventure Scenarios  |  Actual Play Reports  |  Tools

I'm Recruiting Players for a D&D 5e Game: Interested?  |  Follow me on Twitter: @is3rith

I wouldn't do cursed things, or trapped things though. Thats just punishing the players for being interested in the world, which is something most DMs have a hard time getting.



+1. If you're going to put cursed items in your game, fashion it such that the PCs need the cursed item for some greater purpose and dealing with having it on their person is part of the cost of fulfilling that great purpose. Otherwise, you're just asking for them to be paranoid about everything going forward. That's no way to play IMO.



Disagree.

 
My username should actually read: Lunar Savage (damn you WotC!) *Tips top hat, adjusts monocle, and walks away with cane* and yes, that IS Mr. Peanut laying unconscious on the curb. http://asylumjournals.tumblr.com/


What would be wrong with giving them what adventurers want?



I think the issue is "What adventuers want" versus "What players want". I assume that all other things remaining equal, fantasy world adventurers want to be rich, famous and armed to the teeth. If this is all that the players want then they should play a game where the PCs are gun-toting venture capitalists, not D&D. The trouble is the difference between what I say I want and what I actually want. When I say "I want a powerful magic sword", what I probably really mean is "I want my character to feel competent and menacing in combat". Maybe the kleptomaniac party really wants a huge dungeon delve for some great lost treasure. At the end of the day what they really want is to participate in exciting adventures, and apparently they think stripping a place clean is great fun.



I strongly agree with this here.  If they are having fun cleaning house, let them clean house.  Instead of trying to get them to stop make it more interesting and fascinating.  Take them into that dungeon delve and create some items that seem like pieces to some kind of puzzle or mystery to solve.  As far as magic items go, give them great big bags of holding and sell them homes to furnish with their aquired goods. 

This really isn't a problem, the problem is that as a DM you have to realize that its not about you telling a scripted story or having some encounter quota.  If all the players are taking part in this behavior, then the only person who perceives the game to have been slowed down is you-and on that note, whats the rush?  Let them have their fun.
...and in the ancient voice of a million squirrels the begotten chittered "You have set upon yourselves a great and noble task, dare you step further, what say you! What say you!"
I wouldn't do cursed things, or trapped things though. Thats just punishing the players for being interested in the world, which is something most DMs have a hard time getting.



+1. If you're going to put cursed items in your game, fashion it such that the PCs need the cursed item for some greater purpose and dealing with having it on their person is part of the cost of fulfilling that great purpose. Otherwise, you're just asking for them to be paranoid about everything going forward. That's no way to play IMO.



Disagree.

 


Disagree. (double negatives make a positive right?)

"In a way, you are worse than Krusk"                               " As usual, Krusk comments with assuredness, but lacks the clarity and awareness of what he's talking about"

"Can't say enough how much I agree with Krusk"        "Wow, thank you very much"

"Your advice is the worst"                                                  "I'd recommend no one listed to Krusk's opinions about what games to play"



What would be wrong with giving them what adventurers want?



I think the issue is "What adventuers want" versus "What players want". I assume that all other things remaining equal, fantasy world adventurers want to be rich, famous and armed to the teeth. If this is all that the players want then they should play a game where the PCs are gun-toting venture capitalists, not D&D. The trouble is the difference between what I say I want and what I actually want. When I say "I want a powerful magic sword", what I probably really mean is "I want my character to feel competent and menacing in combat". Maybe the kleptomaniac party really wants a huge dungeon delve for some great lost treasure. At the end of the day what they really want is to participate in exciting adventures, and apparently they think stripping a place clean is great fun.



I strongly agree with this here.  If they are having fun cleaning house, let them clean house.  Instead of trying to get them to stop make it more interesting and fascinating.  Take them into that dungeon delve and create some items that seem like pieces to some kind of puzzle or mystery to solve.  As far as magic items go, give them great big bags of holding and sell them homes to furnish with their aquired goods. 

This really isn't a problem, the problem is that as a DM you have to realize that its not about you telling a scripted story or having some encounter quota.  If all the players are taking part in this behavior, then the only person who perceives the game to have been slowed down is you-and on that note, whats the rush?  Let them have their fun.



If your players enjoy no challenge, then it's certainly a decent idea.

If your players enjoy challenge, letting them have everything is a horrible god awful method of DMing. It leads to two problems very quickly. Boredom and the very rapid rise in combat stats/challenges that the DM must throw at the players. The DM soon finds theirself using stronger enemies, better combat tactics, and dice fudging on a consistent level to make it seem like the players are being challenged. 
My username should actually read: Lunar Savage (damn you WotC!) *Tips top hat, adjusts monocle, and walks away with cane* and yes, that IS Mr. Peanut laying unconscious on the curb. http://asylumjournals.tumblr.com/
I wouldn't do cursed things, or trapped things though. Thats just punishing the players for being interested in the world, which is something most DMs have a hard time getting.



+1. If you're going to put cursed items in your game, fashion it such that the PCs need the cursed item for some greater purpose and dealing with having it on their person is part of the cost of fulfilling that great purpose. Otherwise, you're just asking for them to be paranoid about everything going forward. That's no way to play IMO.



Disagree.

 


Disagree. (double negatives make a positive right?)



Only in math.

There's nothing wrong with using cursed items. Creative players can find uses for them. And being a little paranoid is healthy for a party. 
My username should actually read: Lunar Savage (damn you WotC!) *Tips top hat, adjusts monocle, and walks away with cane* and yes, that IS Mr. Peanut laying unconscious on the curb. http://asylumjournals.tumblr.com/
It's healthy? Last time I checked, D&D was about having fun, not being afraid to pick up a piece of copper becuase it might be cursed.
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It's healthy? Last time I checked, D&D was about having fun, not being afraid to pick up a piece of copper becuase it might be cursed.



Some people find that fun, believe it or not. :P
My username should actually read: Lunar Savage (damn you WotC!) *Tips top hat, adjusts monocle, and walks away with cane* and yes, that IS Mr. Peanut laying unconscious on the curb. http://asylumjournals.tumblr.com/


What would be wrong with giving them what adventurers want?



I think the issue is "What adventuers want" versus "What players want". I assume that all other things remaining equal, fantasy world adventurers want to be rich, famous and armed to the teeth. If this is all that the players want then they should play a game where the PCs are gun-toting venture capitalists, not D&D. The trouble is the difference between what I say I want and what I actually want. When I say "I want a powerful magic sword", what I probably really mean is "I want my character to feel competent and menacing in combat". Maybe the kleptomaniac party really wants a huge dungeon delve for some great lost treasure. At the end of the day what they really want is to participate in exciting adventures, and apparently they think stripping a place clean is great fun.



I strongly agree with this here.  If they are having fun cleaning house, let them clean house.  Instead of trying to get them to stop make it more interesting and fascinating.  Take them into that dungeon delve and create some items that seem like pieces to some kind of puzzle or mystery to solve.  As far as magic items go, give them great big bags of holding and sell them homes to furnish with their aquired goods. 

This really isn't a problem, the problem is that as a DM you have to realize that its not about you telling a scripted story or having some encounter quota.  If all the players are taking part in this behavior, then the only person who perceives the game to have been slowed down is you-and on that note, whats the rush?  Let them have their fun.



If your players enjoy no challenge, then it's certainly a decent idea.

If your players enjoy challenge, letting them have everything is a horrible god awful method of DMing. It leads to two problems very quickly. Boredom and the very rapid rise in combat stats/challenges that the DM must throw at the players. The DM soon finds theirself using stronger enemies, better combat tactics, and dice fudging on a consistent level to make it seem like the players are being challenged. 




What?  How did you draw that conclusion?  In what universe does being materialistic equate to non-challenging?  I don't even see how these two are related.


I think its perfectly conceivable to create a challenging, interesting, and enjoyable game while simultaneously allowing your klepto players to steal to their hearts delight.  I've run campaigns based on conducting hiests for that express purpose.  Noone said he had to give out more treasure than the PC's should have at that level.  Hell if they are stealing furniture they are going to take a long time to derive any real value from it.  


The next part isn't really aimed at you...but the larger population on here.
 
Lastly, if they are having fun, they are probably being challenged.  I think thats something people should focus on a lot less around here.  Just have fun with the group, if they are all having fun don't worry about whether you are challenging them enough or not -because you are-.  To illustrate my point I would elude to video games, a lot of my friends (myself included) played a good deal of Skryim when it came out, and despite having full access to a myriad of cheat codes I never used them for more than an hour on one character I created just to screw around with.  Why?  because god mode gets boring real fast, its not challenging or interesting.  Things that are not challenging, are not interesting.  So, if you're players are having fun and interested in the game-they are being challenged so stop fretting over it.
        

...and in the ancient voice of a million squirrels the begotten chittered "You have set upon yourselves a great and noble task, dare you step further, what say you! What say you!"


What would be wrong with giving them what adventurers want?



I think the issue is "What adventuers want" versus "What players want". I assume that all other things remaining equal, fantasy world adventurers want to be rich, famous and armed to the teeth. If this is all that the players want then they should play a game where the PCs are gun-toting venture capitalists, not D&D. The trouble is the difference between what I say I want and what I actually want. When I say "I want a powerful magic sword", what I probably really mean is "I want my character to feel competent and menacing in combat". Maybe the kleptomaniac party really wants a huge dungeon delve for some great lost treasure. At the end of the day what they really want is to participate in exciting adventures, and apparently they think stripping a place clean is great fun.



I strongly agree with this here.  If they are having fun cleaning house, let them clean house.  Instead of trying to get them to stop make it more interesting and fascinating.  Take them into that dungeon delve and create some items that seem like pieces to some kind of puzzle or mystery to solve.  As far as magic items go, give them great big bags of holding and sell them homes to furnish with their aquired goods. 

This really isn't a problem, the problem is that as a DM you have to realize that its not about you telling a scripted story or having some encounter quota.  If all the players are taking part in this behavior, then the only person who perceives the game to have been slowed down is you-and on that note, whats the rush?  Let them have their fun.



If your players enjoy no challenge, then it's certainly a decent idea.

If your players enjoy challenge, letting them have everything is a horrible god awful method of DMing. It leads to two problems very quickly. Boredom and the very rapid rise in combat stats/challenges that the DM must throw at the players. The DM soon finds theirself using stronger enemies, better combat tactics, and dice fudging on a consistent level to make it seem like the players are being challenged. 




What?  How did you draw that conclusion?  In what universe does being materialistic equate to non-challenging?  I don't even see how these two are related.


I think its perfectly conceivable to create a challenging, interesting, and enjoyable game while simultaneously allowing your klepto players to steal to their hearts delight.  I've run campaigns based on conducting hiests for that express purpose.  Noone said he had to give out more treasure than the PC's should have at that level.  Hell if they are stealing furniture they are going to take a long time to derive any real value from it.  

        




I drew that conclusion because the OP said if he asked them what they wanted, they'd go for god mode (or very powerful items which would essentially put them there). And then iserith said "give it to them if that's what they want". Unfortunately, I don't believe iserith has ever met players that never ever tire of a god mode. I have met players however that would never tire of it. They love the power and could use and abuse it for eternity. Which will likely equal boredom for the DM at least.

 I never said don't let them steal everything. Let them steal anything they want. But the OP is looking to slow them down. And cursing their items, adding weight values and carrying capacities, and making it so there's nothing worth stealing are all fair game methods to do this.
My username should actually read: Lunar Savage (damn you WotC!) *Tips top hat, adjusts monocle, and walks away with cane* and yes, that IS Mr. Peanut laying unconscious on the curb. http://asylumjournals.tumblr.com/
Just because the players say what they want is unlimited power and an endless supply of free loot, doesn't mean they would really be happy in a game that consisted of nothing but mountains of treasure, guarded by monsters they can kill in their sleep.
Is this a bad thing? Like they'll loot a mutant dog's corpse and try to turn it's paws into gloves, and they'll roll perception in an empty field and then pick the flowers. I have a rogue that takes every turn to try to steal somthing from somebody, i've started making up random crap for him to get. I had a guy who cut off a Goblin's hands to use for a later. They also love making perception checks at the strangest time, and they expect a simple perception check to reveal all the secrets of a room, though I feel as if that's something I can fix some how.  Any thoughts? My main concern is the Players looting everything, it slows things down and they leave ever single room empty. (Plus they do werid things like take the head of a Goblin and gutting it, then making the Halfling wear it to try and fool the goblin guards.)



Its not uncommon - Adventureres in one of my campaigns would skin a dead dragon and take its hide because they wanted Dragon Hide Armor - so I was at the time (this is a very long time ago) forced to describe the use of various Dragon hides and the advantage they gave:

Red Dragon Hide: +5 AC bonus / +1 save vs Red Dragon Breath
The Citadel Megadungeon: http://yellowdingosappendix.blogspot.com.au/2012/08/the-citadel-mega-dungeon-now-with-room.html
And then iserith said "give it to them if that's what they want". Unfortunately, I don't believe iserith has ever met players that never ever tire of a god mode. I have met players however that would never tire of it. They love the power and could use and abuse it for eternity. Which will likely equal boredom for the DM at least.



"God mode" just means more narrative control. I've already given them that. They can have all the wealth and magic in the campaign world for all I care. They still have the same narrative control as if they were naked and powerless in the deep desert. Which is to say, a lot, right out the gate.

Plus what sort of "power" would they be "abusing" exactly? Made-up fictional power in an imaginary universe? As long as the story I'm watching unfold is interesting, abuse away.

No amount of tips, tricks, or gimmicks will ever be better than simply talking directly to your fellow players to resolve your issues.
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There isn't a right or wrong answer here. Some groups like the vague sense of paranoia of cursed items, some groups want to mutilate every goblin to see if he has some gems in his innards, and some groups just want to hear "okay, you're back to town. You earned level-appropriate gold, call it 6,250 gp each and a 14th level uncommon magic item of your choice."

Talk to your players and find out what their expectations are for treasure, and make sure they understand that while gold and powerful items are fun, they have balance-repercussions, and too much or too little can make the game no fun. Try and find a comprimise everyone will enjoy.

And then iserith said "give it to them if that's what they want". Unfortunately, I don't believe iserith has ever met players that never ever tire of a god mode. I have met players however that would never tire of it. They love the power and could use and abuse it for eternity. Which will likely equal boredom for the DM at least.



"God mode" just means more narrative control. I've already given them that. They can have all the wealth and magic in the campaign world for all I care. They still have the same narrative control as if they were naked and powerless in the deep desert. Which is to say, a lot, right out the gate.

Plus what sort of "power" would they be "abusing" exactly? Made-up fictional power in an imaginary universe? As long as the story I'm watching unfold is interesting, abuse away.



We're playing a game that develops a story. Not straight out telling a story. At least, at my table anyway. And at my table, I prefer the game not be broken and the challenge disappear by giving the players exactly what they want when they want it. Feel free to do what you want at yours.
My username should actually read: Lunar Savage (damn you WotC!) *Tips top hat, adjusts monocle, and walks away with cane* and yes, that IS Mr. Peanut laying unconscious on the curb. http://asylumjournals.tumblr.com/
There isn't a right or wrong answer here. Some groups like the vague sense of paranoia of cursed items, some groups want to mutilate every goblin to see if he has some gems in his innards, and some groups just want to hear "okay, you're back to town. You earned level-appropriate gold, call it 6,250 gp each and a 14th level uncommon magic item of your choice."

Talk to your players and find out what their expectations are for treasure, and make sure they understand that while gold and powerful items are fun, they have balance-repercussions, and too much or too little can make the game no fun. Try and find a comprimise everyone will enjoy.






^This man gets it.
My username should actually read: Lunar Savage (damn you WotC!) *Tips top hat, adjusts monocle, and walks away with cane* and yes, that IS Mr. Peanut laying unconscious on the curb. http://asylumjournals.tumblr.com/
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