Elemental Appeal Question

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Hi! It's my turn and i cast Elemental Appeal . When do i exile the token? At the beginning of this turn's end step or at the beginning of the next end step?

Thanks!
At the begining of the next end step to occur.  This is usually the same turn it was cast.
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Hi! It's my turn and i cast Elemental Appeal . When do i exile the token? At the beginning of this turn's end step or at the beginning of the next end step?

Thanks!

If cast during an end step, then it would exile at the beginning of the next, as I read it.  513.3
If cast during an end step, then it would exile at the beginning of the next, as I read it.  513.3

correct, though you'd need to find a way to do that because it normally isn't castable in the end step (it's a sorcery)
When do i exile the token? At the beginning of this turn's end step or at the beginning of the next end step?

these two options are likely going to be the same

read the actual Oracle wording "Exile it at the beginning of the next end step."

the next end step - notice this doesn't mention a turn?
it's turn independent, it could be this turn or your opponent's turn or even a turn five turns later (if all the end steps were skipped until then)

normally, you'll cast Elemental Appeal in the pre-combat main phase so that means the next end step encountered will likely occur this turn (something like Time Stop or Sundial of the Infinite could change that though)

if Elemental Appeal was cast on your turn, but cast after your turn's end step already started (say via Leyline of Anticipation), the token would be exiled during the next end step (likely on your opponent's turn)

likewise if your turn's end step was skipped (see Sundial above), the next end step would happen on your opponent's turn
of course, if your opponent had a Sundial too, the next end step to actually occur may be a few turns later
(if you both kept activating your Sundial's skipping the end steps for some odd reason)

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Hi! It's my turn and i cast Elemental Appeal . When do i exile the token? At the beginning of this turn's end step or at the beginning of the next end step?

Thanks!

It is not the next turn's End Step;
It is THIS TURN's next End Step

Tax evasion is nothing but legitimate self-defense against the theft that is tax collection.

If cast during an end step, then it would exile at the beginning of the next, as I read it.  513.3

correct, though you'd need to find a way to do that because it normally isn't castable in the end step (it's a sorcery)
When do i exile the token? At the beginning of this turn's end step or at the beginning of the next end step?

these two options are likely going to be the same

the next end step - notice this doesn't mention a turn?
it's turn independent, it could be this turn or your opponent's turn or even a turn five turns later (if all the end steps were skipped until then)

normally, you'll cast it in the pre-combat main phase so that means the next end step encountered will likely occur this turn (something like Time Stop or Sundial of the Infinite could change that though)

I always welcome correction as I'm an eternal student, however I was not aware the active player could not cast a sorcery during the end step. 513.2 suggests that it may be possible "Players may cast spells and activate abilities"

307.1. A player who has priority may cast a sorcery card from his or her hand during a main phase of his or her turn when the stack is empty. Casting a sorcery as a spell uses the stack.

513.2 should read thus:
«Second, the active player gets priority (so players may cast instant spells and activate abilities).»

The part in parenthesis is actually reminder text. 



Tax evasion is nothing but legitimate self-defense against the theft that is tax collection.

I always welcome correction as I'm an eternal student, however I was not aware the active player could not cast a sorcery during the end step. 513.2 suggests that it may be possible "Players may cast spells and activate abilities"

indeed, it is possible to cast spells at that point (usually just instants and spells with flash), but spells without flash and non-instants have additional casting "restrictions" built into them so they can't normally be cast at that point without something saying otherwise.

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307.1. A player who has priority may cast a sorcery card from his or her hand during a main phase of his or her turn when the stack is empty. Casting a sorcery as a spell uses the stack.

513.2 should read thus:
«Second, the active player gets priority (so players may cast instant spells and activate abilities).»

The part in parenthesis is actually reminder text. 




Noted, thanks. That clears it up for me.
nitpick
...but spells without flash and non-instants have additional casting "restrictions" built into them so they can't normally be cast at that point without something saying otherwise.

You do know that this is not true, strictly speaking, do you?

Tax evasion is nothing but legitimate self-defense against the theft that is tax collection.

Thus the scare quotes, I believe.

But you're correct -- It's important to know that the MtG are permissive rather than restrictive.
As stated, rule 513.2 is actually permitting us to cast Sorceries, and no rule forbids it...

Tax evasion is nothing but legitimate self-defense against the theft that is tax collection.

As stated, rule 513.2 is actually permitting us to cast Sorceries, and no rule forbids it...

which is why I agree with what you wrote earlier, that it's more of a generic "reminder rule" than a you can cast any spell you want right now rule

technically, that rule conflicts with the other rule you posted from the sorcery section - two rules giving permissions, one is more specific permissions than the other

If I set a rule : Children can go outside when the bell rings.
and I have a more specific rule for one of the children that says: Chaikov can go outside when the bell rings as long as he's done his homework.

Does the fact that one rule gives general permission to all the children override the specific rule given for a particular child?
no, because specific rules apply in preference to general rules
which is why I called it a "restriction" 

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DJ Vortex

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