Questions about powers for level one in different books

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My friends and I just got back from PAX, and we are excited about D&D.  We played the Intro to D&D, and a few encounters, and we have a few questions about starting out in version 4.  We are all trying to create our characters, but i ran into an issue creating my paladin.  I got excited, and bought both the PHB and the Heroes of the Forgotton Kingdoms.  In the PHB, it indicates that I can pick 4 class features, and 4 powers total, 2 at-will, 1 encounter, and 1 daily.  In the heroes of the forgotten kingdoms, in the design for the cavalier paladin, it indicates I can have seven class features and powers, none of which are indicated by the PHB.  I figure the HOTFK is a bunch of new powers, but it does not tell me which are powers and which are class features, so I do not understand which I can switch out for the ones in the PHB.  Also, the HOTFK does not indicate any daily powers, so can I pick another daily power?  How do these two sources mesh on this issue?

Thanks for your help for a Noob.

Honestly?  Read the books.  Especially read HOTFK.  It spells out everything you need to know.

In a nutshell, the Cavalier is a subclass of Paladin.  If you have an option to choose a type of power, you can choose from the PHB Paladin power list.  The at-wills for the Cavalier are "hard-coded" to the Virtue you take.  Holy Smite if your encounter power and you don't get a daily power choice.

Seriously.  Read the books.   
Yeah.  It can be a bit confusing.

The Essentials product line, which includes "Heroes of" books, introduced a new concept to 4e called subclasses.  Basically, they are builds of a class that are structured very differently from standard setup first used in the Player's Handbook.  One of the biggest differences is that many of these new subclasses may lack at-will, encounter, or daily powers, or a combination there of.  This is an attempt to par down the option-overload that new players may experience with PH-format classes.

The paladin versions do share some stuff in common.  For example, both are considered "Paladins", which means that they both can qualify for feats, paragon paths, and the like that have "Paladin" as a prerequisite.  And they both can take "Paladin" powers.  That is, powers that specifically state "Paladin" as the class and have a level associated with it.  Powers without a level are specific to the build they are introduced with, even if they do have the appropriate class name.

And while it may that be exactly clear from the format,  the Cavalier does have leveled daily attack powers, as well as leveled utility powers.  On these levels, a cavalier can take a power of the same type and level from a different source (including the PH).  What the cavalier lacks is encounter attack powers.  So even when the cavalier reaches the appropriate level, encounter attack powers are never an option for him.

But if you're still feeling a bit confused, remember that the best rule of thumb for reading the rules in D&D is that the rules give you exactly what they say they give you.  No more, no less. 

Hope that helps.




Thinking about creating a race for 4e? Make things a lil' easier on yourself by reading my Race Mechanic Creation Guide first.
Thank you for your replies. My confusion on this issue mainly stems from te conflicting ideas from the two books. I get that the essentials line is trying to cut out option overload, (which caters to me), but it seems to modify the rules without explicitly indicating it is a new rule set. Should we just defer to te DM when these rules conflict?
Thank you for your replies. My confusion on this issue mainly stems from te conflicting ideas from the two books. I get that the essentials line is trying to cut out option overload, (which caters to me), but it seems to modify the rules without explicitly indicating it is a new rule set. Should we just defer to te DM when these rules conflict?


They aren't a new rule set, per se.  They're more like (very) varient class builds.  The rules don't conflict so much as differ.  Again, the best rule of thumb is that the rules give you exactly what they say they give you.


I think your best option for now is to choose one paladin version or the other and stick with it until you get some more experience with the game rules.  If you like the cavalier, give it a try and stick with it as written for a while.  The cavalier even tells you exactly what you get on a level-by-level basis, so just follow that.  Don't even refer to the PH paladin.  Trying to resolve the differences will likely cause you option overload, which is what you're trying to avoid.
Thinking about creating a race for 4e? Make things a lil' easier on yourself by reading my Race Mechanic Creation Guide first.
Thanks again. This is starting to make more sense. I guess my biggest problem was I didn't realize that 4e and essentials were two different products with "differing" rules. Now that I know this I can proceed with a cavalier Paladin.
Thanks again. This is starting to make more sense. I guess my biggest problem was I didn't realize that 4e and essentials were two different products with "differing" rules. Now that I know this I can proceed with a cavalier Paladin.



Correction:  Essentials and 4e are not two different products.  Essentials are part of 4e.  It's all one system, and everything can be used with everything else.  Essentials was just a dramatic shift in class design.  And it wasn't the first time different class designs were experimented with.  Power Point based psionic classes, which were introduced in the Player's Handbook 3, also function very differently from the "AEDU" set-up of the original classes.  You can use AEDU, Power Point, and Essential style classes together at the same table and everything will work just fine.

Sorry if it sounds like I'm splitting hairs, but Essentials and 4e being two different games is a piece of self-perpetuating misinformation that needs to die in a fire.
Thinking about creating a race for 4e? Make things a lil' easier on yourself by reading my Race Mechanic Creation Guide first.
Thanks again for the clarification! I understand that they can all be used together, I'm just used to a hard set of rules, with less flexibility. This would have been a lot easier for me to grasp if your last post was printed as a foreword in the essentials books or something. Thanks again for all your help.
No problem.  And welcome to the boards.
Thinking about creating a race for 4e? Make things a lil' easier on yourself by reading my Race Mechanic Creation Guide first.
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