5E Manual of the Planes

Before 4E, we had the Great Wheel cosmology with eleventy-hundred planes to explore. 4E did a lot of swooping changes and condensed them down to the World Axis cosmology. I realize it's a bit soon in the playtest phase to be worrying too much about planar exploration, but the question still stands: which do you prefer?

My own opinion:
I prefer the Great Wheel cosmology. I loved all of the fiddly little planes that were presented. Ethereal Plane, Astral Plane, Elemental Planes, Para-Elemental Planes, Quasi-Elemental Planes, Negative Energy Plane, Positive Energy Planes, Demi-Planes....I loved them. I have no doubt that I have read the 1E Manual of the Planes hundreds of times. Sure, 90% of those planes would never be explored by PCs, but they were wonderful to read about and there was always the chance that monsters could come from them. I still hold the 1E MotP as one of the best RPG books released for D&D, both for crunch and for fluff.

If I had to pick one - or the other - it would be the Great Wheel.

However - I would prefer the Planes to be represented as inaccessable by mortals.

Perhaps even "death" is the only way you can travel the Planes.

The Planes are realms of extremes - absolutes - and, as far as the Great Wheel, somewhat convoluted concepts of buffet philosophy.

A great big Matrix Trilogy - totally a mess, but conceptually fun to play around in.

A HUGE fan of Demi-Planes though... monstrously so - and those should be where mortals get to "play."  Did 4th Edition have Demi-Planes?

I prefer the great wheel cosmology, as long as it is seen symbolically and has the flexibility of including smaller demiplanes, multiple worlds in the prime material, and non-aligned planes.

I like to think of the great wheel of a way of categorizing planes. Any plane that is lawful good would in a sense be heavenly, a plane that is lawful evil is hellish, a plane that is chaotic evil is abyssal, etc.

They shouldn't be accessable except through the aforementioned death, and top level spells such as astral projection and gate.
I much prefer the World Axis.

I even retro-fit the cosmology into my v3.5 homebrew, as a sorta nod to 4e ;).

My Cosmology Notes
There are two D&D cosmologies discussed in these notes: the Great Wheel (used in v.3.5 and earlier editions) and the World Axis (used in 4e). Likewise, two supplements are referred to: Manual of the Planes for 3e and its counterpart for 4e. All planar traits mentioned below are as described on pages 7-14 of the 3e MotP.

Knights of Everest uses the World Axis cosmology, which is described on pages 160 and 161 of the 4e DMG and pages 12 and 13 of the 4e Manual of the Planes. This article is not an attempt to actually convert the 4e MotP to 3e. It’s merely some quick and dirty notes on how I’d use the World Axis cosmology in 3e.

The Astral Sea is much like its counterpart in the Great Wheel. Spells that access the astral plane now access the Astral Sea instead. Unlike its counterpart however, the Astral Sea is not omnipresent (see ‘Planar Interactions’ below); that is, it doesn’t link with virtually every other plane. You can therefore ignore the information for astral links presented on page 48 of the 3e MotP. Likewise, ignore any mention of traveling to other planes via the spell astral projection. Instead, use the information for veils of color given on page 87 of the 4e MotP.

The Astral Sea has the following Traits: No Gravity, Normal Time, Infinite Size, Alterable Morphic Trait, No Elemental or Energy Traits, Mildly Neutral-Aligned, Enhanced Magic. These traits are as written for the astral plane (see page 47 and 48 of the 3e MotP).

The Elemental Chaos is an amalgam of the 3e elemental planes and limbo. It has the following traits: Subjective Directional Gravity, Normal Time, Infinite Size, No Energy-Dominant Traits, Highly Morphic, Sporadic Dominant-Element, Strongly Chaos-Aligned, Wild Magic (as written for Limbo on page 93 of the 3e MotP). The Elemental Chaos can be controlled as described for Limbo on pages 93 and 94.

There are no Primordials in Knights of Everest, unlike the 4e cosmology. The Elemental Chaos is unruled (as described in the sidebar ‘Who Rules the Elemental Planes’ on page 84 of the 3e MotP).

The Feywild has the following traits: Normal Gravity, Normal Time, Finite Size, Alterable Morphic, No Elemental or Energy Traits, Mildly Neutral-Aligned, Enhanced Magic (as written for the plane of faerie on page 210 of the 3e MotP). Elves call the feywild by its proper name, Arvanaith.

The Shadowfell is essentially the plane of shadow from 3e (as mentioned on page 15 of the 4e MotP, in the sidebar discussing the Great Wheel). It has the following traits: Normal Gravity, Normal Time, Finite Size, No Elemental or Energy Traits, Mildly Neutral-Aligned, Enhanced Magic, Impeded Magic (both as written for the plane of shadow on page 60 of the 3e MotP).

The information on shadow links (page 60) applies to the Shadowfell.

Planar Interactions: Planar interaction is described on page 15 of the 3e MotP. Examine the World Axis diagram (above), notice that the Astral Sea is the ‘upper’ part and the Elemental Chaos is the ‘lower’ part of the cosmology. The Material World serves as the ‘axis’ with the Feywild and the Shadowfell as parallel planes.

The Astral Sea is separate from the Material Plane; it is not a transitive plane (unlike its counterpart in the Great Wheel). The Elemental Chaos is likewise a separate plane.

The Feywild and the Shadowfell are both coexistent and conterminous with the Material Plane. In the World Axis cosmology, they are termed parallel planes (as mentioned on page 8 of the 4e MotP). Spells that access the astral plane (in the Great Wheel) now access the Feywild (in the World Axis). Likewise, spells that access the ethereal (in the Great Wheel) now access the Shadowfell (in the World Axis).

There is no ethereal plane in the World Axis cosmology. This affects a number of spells and magic items that duplicate those spells (ported from the sidebar ‘Without the Ethereal’ on page 55 of the 3e MotP):

* The following spells either do not function or do not exist: ethereal jaunt, etherealness, and secret chest.

* The following spells have elements that do not function without an ethereal plane: Dimensional anchor, invisibility purge, see invisibility, true seeing, and spells with the force descriptor, such as magic missile and wall of force. When using these spells, ignore any reference to the ethereal plane, other elements function as normal.

* The blink spell works by accessing the Shadowfell.

Ain't ya glad you asked?  Well, I am ;).

/\ Art
Ain't ya glad you asked?  Well, I am ;).



I am, indeed, glad I asked.
I enjoy viewing the opinions of others, whether I share them or not. 
Ain't ya glad you asked?  Well, I am ;).



I am, indeed, glad I asked.
I enjoy viewing the opinions of others, whether I share them or not. 

I'm being silly, not snarky.  My sblock dropped half a screen (at least).  Didn't mean to over do it ;).

/\ Art
I really liked the World Axis when it came out--I thought it was clearly superior to the Great Wheel. Now I've softened on it a bit and I marginally prefer it over the GW. I think it was the newness that drew me in. While the World Axis is still closer to what I prefer in my game, there is something that feels a bit incomplete to me, but I can't put my finger on what it is.

Before 4E, we had the Great Wheel cosmology with eleventy-hundred planes to explore. 4E did a lot of swooping changes and condensed them down to the World Axis cosmology. I realize it's a bit soon in the playtest phase to be worrying too much about planar exploration, but the question still stands: which do you prefer?



While I liked both cosmologies, I have more fond memories of the great wheel.  Of course, that's probably due to the fact that AD&D 2e gave us Planescape, which was awesome.  That being said, what I'd like to see for DDN is a book that presents both the Axis and the Wheel, as well as a guide to creating one's own cosmologies.  While D&D does have it's own default flavors, the game, at it's heart, is an instrument for us to tell our own stories and have fun.  I really want it to keep that flexibility regardless of what default flavors they go with.

There are a great many problems that can be circumvented by players and DMs having a mature discussion about what the game is going to be like before they ever sit down together to play.

 

The answer really does lie in more options, not in confining and segregating certain options.

 

You really shouldn't speak for others.  You can't hear what someone else is saying when you try to put your words in their mouth.

 

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Before 4E, we had the Great Wheel cosmology with eleventy-hundred planes to explore. 4E did a lot of swooping changes and condensed them down to the World Axis cosmology. I realize it's a bit soon in the playtest phase to be worrying too much about planar exploration, but the question still stands: which do you prefer?



While I liked both cosmologies, I have more fond memories of the great wheel.  Of course, that's probably due to the fact that AD&D 2e gave us Planescape, which was awesome.  That being said, what I'd like to see for DDN is a book that presents both the Axis and the Wheel, as well as a guide to creating one's own cosmologies.  While D&D does have it's own default flavors, the game, at it's heart, is an instrument for us to tell our own stories and have fun.  I really want it to keep that flexibility regardless of what default flavors they go with.

I'd be all for this and I think that while we're getting edition neutral products, this one would really be handy to have. I think that the advice on building one's own comsmology would be welcomed by a lot of people.
I see no reason the game has to choose.  The only difference between the Great Wheel and the World Axis is the relationship of these planes to one another.  In the Great WHeel, they Outer PLanes are rigidly mapped to border one another.  In the World Axis, they are all floating about in the Astral Sea.  Both can be true.

Just present each plane separately and then have a chapter called "Cosmologies" in which you offer several ways that these planes are can relate to one another.  Let the reader choose which he likes, or offer him the tools to design his own cosmology.

Edited to add: And this is exactly how the designers said they want to do a Manual of the Planes, at GenCon just a few weeks ago.
I see no reason the game has to choose.  The only difference between the Great Wheel and the World Axis is the relationship of these planes to one another.  In the Great WHeel, they Outer PLanes are rigidly mapped to border one another.  In the World Axis, they are all floating about in the Astral Sea.  Both can be true.

Just present each plane separately and then have a chapter called "Cosmologies" in which you offer several ways that these planes are can relate to one another.  Let the reader choose which he likes, or offer him the tools to design his own cosmology.

Edited to add: And this is exactly how the designers said they want to do a Manual of the Planes, at GenCon just a few weeks ago.

Awesome!
No contest, the World Axis.  The Great Wheel is too infused with the abomination known as alignment.
Another day, another three or four entries to my Ignore List.
Before 4E, we had the Great Wheel cosmology with eleventy-hundred planes to explore. 4E did a lot of swooping changes and condensed them down to the World Axis cosmology. I realize it's a bit soon in the playtest phase to be worrying too much about planar exploration, but the question still stands: which do you prefer?



Neither.

Well, I guess I prefer the World Axis, but to me that is like choosing to eat tripe instead of haggis.  I don't like either of them all that much, but if forced to choose gun-to-my-head...

Rather than have a codified cosmology that has solid rules implications ("These are the planes, they are connected like so, and are the home planes of these creatures" etc), I'd prefer WotC remember that we're playing D&D because we like fantasy and are familiar with the tropes, and not bother giving us a default assumption of cosmology, and let us make our own and work out the implications.

Of course, that will never happen.

So, I will do as I always have done, and throw out the default cosmology and do my best to cobble together something that works for me, hoping that I spend most of my time being creative and not too much time messing around with rules that are predicated on the abandoned default fluff (which was less of an issue in 4th than prior editions; not surprising, given that edition's emphasis on fluff-agnostic rules).

Essentials zigged, when I wanted to continue zagging. Roll dice, not cars.
I see no reason the game has to choose.  The only difference between the Great Wheel and the World Axis is the relationship of these planes to one another.  In the Great WHeel, they Outer PLanes are rigidly mapped to border one another.  In the World Axis, they are all floating about in the Astral Sea.  Both can be true.

Just present each plane separately and then have a chapter called "Cosmologies" in which you offer several ways that these planes are can relate to one another.  Let the reader choose which he likes, or offer him the tools to design his own cosmology.

Edited to add: And this is exactly how the designers said they want to do a Manual of the Planes, at GenCon just a few weeks ago.



Rather than have a codified cosmology that has solid rules implications ("These are the planes, they are connected like so, and are the home planes of these creatures" etc), I'd prefer WotC remember that we're playing D&D because we like fantasy and are familiar with the tropes, and not bother giving us a default assumption of cosmology, and let us make our own and work out the implications.

Of course, that will never happen.


Ahem.
"Oh, look at this crow!  It looks delicious!  I think I'll eat some!" 
Essentials zigged, when I wanted to continue zagging. Roll dice, not cars.
"Oh, look at this crow!  It looks delicious!  I think I'll eat some!" 



Just because that's what the devs say they want to do doesn't mean that's what they will do.
Another day, another three or four entries to my Ignore List.
"Oh, look at this crow!  It looks delicious!  I think I'll eat some!" 



Just because that's what the devs say they want to do doesn't mean that's what they will do.

True, but here's to hoping that they follow through on this one.
I suspect that, for many people, their love of the Great Wheel largely stems from their nostalgic love of Planescape.

Since I have no history with 2E or Planescape, I largely see the Great Wheel as an astrological landfill full of alignment garbage, so I greatly prefer the World Axis.  I would love to see a Planescape reboot that uses the World Axis as its basis.

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I suspect that, for many people, their love of the Great Wheel largely stems from their nostalgic love of Planescape.

Perhaps.  Although I should point out that I freaking LOVE Planescape, yet have a profound HATE for the Great Wheel.  

Since I have no history with 2E or Planescape, I largely see the Great Wheel as an astrological landfill full of alignment garbage, so I greatly prefer the World Axis.  I would love to see a Planescape reboot that uses the World Axis as its basis.

Nothing about the concept of Planescape ("There are lots of planes, and at the metaphorical "center" of them is Sigil, the City of Doors, which contains portals to and from every known and unknown plane.  Wackiness ensues!") absolutely requires a cosmology like The Great Wheel.

So your idea is absolutely tennable.  4e kinda already did it, in the 4e Manual of the Planes.
 
Essentials zigged, when I wanted to continue zagging. Roll dice, not cars.
PlaneScape is entirely possible using the World Axis.

There are certain planes that either simply wouldn't exist or would need to be completely reworked in order to include them in a totally alignment-free cosmology, mostly because there are a few that existed simply to fill in the gaps with the 9 alignment system, if the Great Wheel cosmology was also included (and alignment is totally non-enforced).

By the by: people seem to simply adore using the term "nostalgia" since DDN was started. Please keep in mind that nostalgia is a sentimental longing for the past. For some of us who still play and thoroughly enjoy old-E games, it is not nostalgia. I do not have a nostalgic love of PlaneScape. I have a current love of PlaneScape...complete with its "astrological landfill full of alignment garbage".

No one has insulted the World Axis cosmology, though it is entirely possible to do so, so please try to extend that same courtesy. This is a "which do you prefer" discussion, not a "sling ridiculous insults at the one you do NOT prefer" discussion. Stating that you dislike the Great Wheel due to the alignment restrictions is fine, and entirely part of the discussion. Terms like "abomination", "landfill", and "garbage" do nothing to help your point.
well if they do a 5e manual of the planes, it must FOCUS on the PLANES, and not lsit any deities in it, save that for the setting books.
a mask everyone has at least two of, one they wear in public and another they wear in private.....
I prefer the Great Wheel cosmology.
I absolutely 100% loved the Great Wheel. The layout of the planes seemd to agree with, in my opinion, the natural tendancy of sentient creatures to flock together (tigers flock; birds flock; people flock. Therefore, elves flock; demons flock; devils flock; drow flock; myconids flock; etc.). Which, by extension, proves that I liked the alignment system, but that is a matter for another discussion.
  However, that being said, I also loved the introduction of the Feywild & the Elemental Chaos. I refuse to bring up the Shadowfell, as it's just the Plane of Shadow, with a less-awesome name.
  The Feywild brought in a home for all of the "cutesy" fey stuff, like fairies/pixies, instead of them being caught in Arvandor or imprisoned on earth for infidelity. No, the Feywild is a place of the natural (trees/'shrooms/etc.), as well as those things warped by the natural (formorians/Various dire-beasts). The Feywild is also the land of a milennia-long sojourn of a new breed of elf specifically designed in 4E (If the Eladrin existed in 3E, please forgive me, as I speak in ignorance and do not wish to look up anything in 3E, because there is just so much stuff!).
  The Elemental Chaos is just that. Instead of the tedium & monotony of four planes of each element (a giant rock; a ball of fire that brought Johnny Cash to mind whenever I played there; a place of endless gravity [for no apparent reason?] in which you can only fall forever and be attack by things you cannot see; and a giant, bottomless/topless ocean, in which you will drown without the combination casting of water-breathing & permenancy), the Elemental Chaos is just raw, undefinite, undivided, residual, creationalistic energy; a giant compilation of the four Great Planes of the Elements, and the Quazi-Elemental Planes.
  Do I wish for the return of the Great Wheel? Absolutely. However, I think that the Great Wheel could be improved by the addition of the Feywild (if you are hell-bent on a new name, the Plane of Nature, or something that doesn't sound like Elton John made it up, but personally I like the Feywild) and the compilation of the (Quazi-)Elemental Planes into the Elemental Chaos.
  As a side note, I also think it should be the Great Wheel, because I do severely love Mechanus, and I feel it is an insult to automatons everywhere for their plane of existance to be thrown in at last minute three-fourths of the way through an edition in Dragon Magazine, that for them to be established in an already existing, hard-backed, article in the Manual of the Planes.

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Any pictures or maps showing the difference between the "great wheel" and the "world axis"?

Cause it sounds to me like you could stick your great wheel onto your world axis :P 
Put me down for the big wagon wheel in the sky.
I like having planes that don't necessarily have to be places the characters go and kill stuff.

As for Planescape (easily done in WA), I have a current Planescape campaign that has gone from 3rd to 4th Ed rules, is now on hiatus (started looking back at Basic, 1st and 2nd Ed the last year or so).  
Any pictures or maps showing the difference between the "great wheel" and the "world axis"?

Cause it sounds to me like you could stick your great wheel onto your world axis :P 



You kinda can.  The Elemental Chaos is just a smash-up of the Elemental Planes (regular, para-, and quasi-).

The Astral Sea (and the Dominions that lie within) are basically the equivalent of the Outer planes as well as the Astral Plane (if I'm remembering my GW cosmology correctly).

The Plane of Shadow is kinda sorta the Shadowfell.

The Feywild really has no analogue, but thematically it is basically Arvandor or Arborea, without the realm of the CG baggage.


The Abyss is still the Abyss.

The role of the Ethereal Plane is more or less irrelevant, but aspects of it were swallowed up by other planes, and the same can be said for the Positive and Negative energy planes.  Ultimately, every plane is a bit more safe/realistic to adventure in, and while many of them are dangerous due to the hazards, monsters, and other threats that dwell within, none of them will simply kill you as soon as you arrive if you transport to there unprepared.

An impromptu trip to the Elemental Plane of Earth, without a means to breathe stone or even move through solid earth, pretty much assured death (if not instant).  A trip to the Postive Energy Plane causes you to explode.  A trip to the Negative Energy Plane causes you to shrivel and die.  Frankly, the Great Wheel is a cosmology that is of limited use as a source of adventure.

In contrast, every plane in 4e (lacking as the World Axis is) is dedicated to being functional as an adventure site. 
Essentials zigged, when I wanted to continue zagging. Roll dice, not cars.
Any pictures or maps showing the difference between the "great wheel" and the "world axis"?

Cause it sounds to me like you could stick your great wheel onto your world axis :P 



There's no Shadowfell or Feywild in the Great Wheel, and they never detailed a Gladsheim-like plane, or a positive or negative material plane for the World Axis.  However, Gladsheim would be a fine Astral Dominion, and the Positive and Negative Material could be regions of the Elemental Chaos in the World Axis and the Shadowfell is kind of the Plane of Shadow in the Great Wheel, and the Feywild is the Plane of Faerie.

It works fine. I have little doubt that a 5e Manual of the Planes could easily simply detail different planes, show you how they set up in different cosmologies and then let you decide your own cosmology if you like.

Edited with Steely Dan's added info.  Thanks, Steely Dan!

There's no Shadowfell or Feywild in the Great Wheel, and they never detailed a Gladsheim-like plane, or a positive or negative material plane for the World Axis.  However, Gladsheim would be a fine Astral Dominion, and the Positive and Negative Material could be regions of the Elemental Chaos in the World Axis and the Shadowfell is kind of the Demiplane of Shadow in the Great Wheel.  (Don't know about the Feywild, though.)




The 3rd Ed Manual of the Planes has the Plane of Shadow and the Plane of Faerie, and Planescape has the Seelie Court demi-plane (wanders through the "upper" planes).
I don't like either cosmologies.

The put concepts in their own planes, ignoring that these concepts cannot exist or evolve without a dynamic interaction with some other concepts, opposite concepts first.
If opposite forces has to plane-travel to reach each others, it makes no sense, even more when they are placed on opposite sides just to have a lovely symetrical map of the planes.

I don't like having a map of the planes. I would prefer that each planar travel consist in a real travel to find your way between dynamic planes and dynamic planes in constant evolution (because opposite forces are not in their own closets). These dynamic planes could even become a reason to the complexity of using magic.

I think the D&D cosmology should have less planes and more demi-planes.

If you think my english is bad, just wait until you see my spanish and my italian. Defiling languages is an art.

Thanks, Dan!  I amended my post!
Thanks, Dan!  I amended my post!




No problemo, I like your style, dude. *said like Sam Elliot/Cowboy Guy in The Big Lebowski*

So, it looks like the Ethereal Plane is back, should it be something that permeates every plane?
Thanks for the pics.

I see that there are actually "two wheels", the Alignment planes and the Elemental planes.

I was sort of hoping you could mash the two cosmologies to fit this pic:



But it looks like Feywild and Shadowfell sort of de-axify the World Axis.  Maybe they can be the hubcaps? 
Definitely prefer the world axis.

I like the Astral Sea containg all the divine realms, opposed by the Elemental Chaos ( gods verus titans/elder gods, mirroring real-world creation myths) and the corrupted Abyss-- with the Primal world/prime material plane at the center. I'm also a fan of the Lovecraftian Far Realm, and LOVE the truly mythical Feywild. Indifferent on the Shadowfell, though (could use more Ravenloft).

Not really a fan of either Planescape or the Great Wheel-- they demystify the planes to the point of reducing them to sci-fi worlds, for the purpose of making a sort of "periodic table" of the planes, IMO. It seems to me that almost every plane has to have a mathematical opposite, with planes in between that are "this neighboir averaged with that neighbor." A lot of grid-filling going on, rather than having planes that are evocative on their own. Again, IMO.

That being said, give both World Axis and Great Wheel as examples in a MotP, DMG, PHB, Red box, whatever-- allow groups to use what they like, or make their own cosmology.
Shadowfell feels too banal and corporeal to me.
Shadowfell feels too banal and corporeal to me.

I agree.

In fact, any non elemental plane feels too corporeal for me.

If you think my english is bad, just wait until you see my spanish and my italian. Defiling languages is an art.

In fact, any non elemental plane feels too corporeal for me.




Even the Ethereal?
In fact, any non elemental plane feels too corporeal for me.




Even the Ethereal?

Hehe, if you consider elemental = inner planes, you forgot the astral plane and the material plane Wink

As ethereal and astral planes as being elemental can be discussed, even if D&D is clear about that elements are physical and based on Air, earth, Fire and Water, material plane can't be an elemental plane by definition. So I don't think inner planes = elemental planes. It's one of the numerous flaws in the great wheel cosmology.

If you think my english is bad, just wait until you see my spanish and my italian. Defiling languages is an art.

In fact, any non elemental plane feels too corporeal for me.




Even the Ethereal?

Hehe, if you consider elemental = inner planes, you forgot the astral plane and the material plane 

As ethereal and astral planes as being elemental can be discussed, even if D&D is clear about that elements are physical and based on Air, earth, Fire and Water, material plane can't be an elemental plane by definition. So I don't think inner planes = elemental planes. It's one of the numerous flaws in the great wheel cosmology.





This brings up an interesting point, the Ethereal Plane is back in 5th Ed (mentioned in the condition), does it permeate all other planes?
I'm late to the party as usual...  I vastly prefer the Great Wheel.  Perhaps it's nostalgia, preferred play style, or just the story potential. (okay, not really.  I will happily admit I don't care about alignment beyond roleplaying fluff...  That said 9 alignment fluff bits, please!)  I've had many interesting stories with the Great Wheel and Planescape as basis (Planescape was part of what introduced me to D&D, I won't deny).  When I first encountered the Wheel Axis, I raged (granted, I was a fervent in my anti-4e stance back when I was a total jerk) and thought it was a gimmicky bunch of amusement park stations.  While most of that notion is gone, the Axis still feels a bit off to me.  Plus, I still hate the Titans rip-off with the Primordials vs. Gods thing (especially when applied to every campaign setting ).  Heck, I just dislike the PoL fluff in general.

Now, as for the book?  There are many cosmologies and what not attempted throughout D&D!  Wild Space in Spelljammer, World Axis in Points of Light, The Great Wheel in Planescape (Albeit, that came later)  I'd rather MotP source books dedicated to each so each can have a fleshed out representation instead of being crammed into one book with close to no info.

That said, I really like building my own cosmologies rather than having an assumed one (unless I'm running Planescape, lol)

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The Designers have already stated that the Great Wheel will be the assumed base for DDN but that is only one way to order and categorize what is essentially a complex structure.

I would prefer it if DDN combined the 4E and the Great Wheel and take the best concepts from both (Elemental Chaos, Feywild, lots of themed planes, etc.).
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