How do you play D&D Next?

How do you play D&D Next or anyedition for that matter. I play it online on a virtual table, that I found called OpenRPG Pious Paladin. It is a very neat application, quite daunting at first but once you figure it out it's pretty easy and simple to install. Been using it for over a month now. I don't live close to any of my friends and I don't know many people in my area let alone D&D players. 

This program is amazing. Here is a link:

www.knowledgearcana.com/download-traipse



I try and get local people to try and play, nobody turns up, I cry in a corner then get a friend and my partner to play a dumbed down soul destroying version most often.

Finding D&D groups is truly a painful experience in many places. 
i play over Roll20 and ventrilo.

Happy to be back on the best D&D forum on the internet!

Yeah, I have noticed that. I have some local hobbie shops near me but they seem to always be empty. I see more Magic players than D&D. Glad I found the program tho. It has been so much fun. Although the gathering cannot compare. But it's still something.
Roll20 is web browser based right? Seems very restricting. 
Roll20 is web browser based right? Seems very restricting. 



well i still use maptool for my 4e games, but roll20 is just fine for a game as simple as the playtest is.

Happy to be back on the best D&D forum on the internet!

Finding D&D groups is truly a painful experience in many places. 



+1

I play locally.  As an "older" player, I now DM for the local kids.  Started with my own, now have them (3) and their friends (7) to pick from.

I'd be open to virtual D&D, but I am desperately holding on to tabletop in person...

∴ "Virtus junxit, mors non separabit." 

I love the VT but because its not face to face people flake out a lot more, come up with crappy excuses and the final issue... the biggie... millions of players with just a few DMs (in limited timezones).

I really wish we had a much more advanced tool with features for sharing campaigns, settings and encounters. Not that im hinting at anything WotC... you hear that...

There is ONE D&D group local to me, however they are part of a university gaming group and they outright refuse to play with people who arent in the uni. I wish there was just one gaming store where I live where people could play and buy supplies. If I had the funds I would probably consider a startup project on it, take the limelight off Warhammer which is the only thing people have here. (FYI I live in a city, its not like its a small area or anything.) 
I consider myself extremely lucky, in that I not only have a local group to play with, but they're all the best friends I have around here. It's the best way to play.

I've done the online gaming/virtual tabletop thing before, and I'm still not against it. I find that playing with people who have web cams really helps, kinda keeps it fresh and alive. By the way, here's another free one: tabletopforge.com/

They just had a Kickstarter that got funded, so they're going to be releasing a strongly developed version of it soon. Until then, the beta's still available to use.
My FLGS went several years severely lacking in D&D play. Magic: the Gathering and Pokemon seemed to rule the roost there. There were a couple of Battletech tables that saw occasional use. I ran a 2E game weekly, and 1 other DM ran a 3.5 game on the same night. When 4E started promoting game days, we had an influx of new players. It was a much-needed shot in the arm. I took on another 2 nights' worth of DMing (both 4E) and had a substantial waiting list of players. The store picked up 3 more DMs (more on game days, naturally), and they, too had people waiting to play. It slowly trickled off over time, as most things do, and by the time the first DDN playtest packet was available we were down to 2 DMs (including myself). I was running my 2E game, and the other DM was still running 4E.

Today I still DM a 2E game at my FLGS, a DDN game at home, and a DDN game on Play by Post (as well as playing in a BECMI game on Play by Post).
I playtest DDN in person using tabletop, and online with virtual table, using the VT  Roll20 app on Google+ Hangout
Drunk.
I have played virtually but mostly I play tabletop in real life with real dice, paper char sheets and all.  
Its not as fun to DM over the internet I feel... I want to be able to see the players faces.
Drunk.



D&D Next - Basic and Expert Editions

I firmly believe that there should be two editions of the game; the core rules released as a "Basic" set and a more complicated expanded rules edition released as an "Expert" set. These two editions would provide separate entry points to the game; one for new players or players that want a more classic D&D game and another entry point for experienced gamers that want more options and all the other things they have come to expect from previous editions.

Also, they must release several rules modules covering the main elements of the game (i.e., classes, races, combat, magic, monsters, etc.) upon launch to further expand the game for those that still need more complexity in a particular element of the game.


Here's a mockup of the Basic Set I created.



(CLICK HERE TO VIEW LARGER IMAGE)
  

Basic Set

This boxed set contains a simple, "bare bones" edition of the game; the core rules. It's for those that want a rules-light edition of the game that is extremely modifiable or for new players that get intimidated easily by too many rules and/or options. The Basic Set contains everything needed to play with all the "classic" D&D races (i.e., Human, Dwarf, Elf, and Halfling) and classes (i.e., Cleric, Fighter, Rogue, Wizard) all the way up to maximum level (i.e., 20th Level).

The Basic boxed set contains:

Quick Start Rules
A "choose your own way" adventure intended as an intro to RPGs and basic D&D terms.

Player's Handbook
(Softcover, 125 pages)
Features rules for playing the classic D&D races and classes all the way up to 20th level.

Dungeon Master's Guide

(Softcover, 125 pages)
Includes the basic rules for dungeon masters.

Monster Manual
(Softcover, 100 pages)
Includes all the classic iconic monsters from D&D. 

Introductory Adventure
(Keep on the Borderlands)
An introductory adventure for beginning players and DMs.

Also includes: 

Character Sheets
Reference Sheets
Set of Dice


Expert Set

A set of hardbound rules that contains the core rules plus expanded races and classes, more spells and a large selection of optional rules modules — that is, pretty much everything that experienced players have come to expect. Each expert edition manual may be purchased separately, or in a boxed set. The Expert set includes:

Expert PHB (Hardcover, 225 pages. $35 Includes core rules plus 10 playable races, 10 character classes, expanded selection of spells and rules modules for players.)
Expert DMG (Hardcover, 250 pages. $35 Includes core rules plus expanded rules modules for DMs.)
Expert MM (Hardcover, 225 pages. $35 Includes an expanded list of monsters and creatures to challenge characters)


Expansions

These expansion rules modules can be used with both the Basic and Expert sets. Each expansion covers one specific aspect of the game, such as character creation, combat, spells, monsters, etc.) 

Hall of Heroes (Hardcover, 225 pages. $35 Includes a vast selection of playable character races and classes, new and old all in one book)
Combat and Tactics (Hardcover, 225 pages. $35 Includes dozens of new and old optional rules for combat all in one book)
Creature Compendium (Hardcover, 350 pages.$35 Includes hundreds of monsters, new and old all in one book)
The Grimoire (Hardcover, 225 pages. $35 Includes hundreds of new and old spells all in one book)





A Million Hit Points of Light: Shedding Light on Damage

A Million Hit Points of Light: Shedding Light on Damage and Hit Points

In my personal campaigns, I use the following system for damage and dying. It's a slight modification of the long-standing principles etsablished by the D&D game, only with a new definition of what 0 or less hit points means. I've been using it for years because it works really well. However, I've made some adjustments to take advantage of the D&D Next rules. I've decided to present the first part in a Q&A format for better clarity. So let's begin...

What are hit points?
The premise is very simple, but often misunderstood; hit points are an abstraction that represent the character's ability to avoid serious damage, not necessarily their ability to take serious damage. This is a very important distinction. They represent a combination of skillful maneuvering, toughness, stamina and luck. Some targets have more hit points because they are physically tougher and are harder to injure...others have more because they are experienced combatants and have learned how to turn near fatal blows into mere scratches by skillful maneuvering...and then others are just plain lucky. Once a character runs out of hit points they become vulnerable to serious life-threatening injuries.

So what exactly does it mean to "hit" with a successful attack roll, then?
It means that through your own skill and ability you may have wounded your target if the target lacks the hit points to avoid the full brunt of the attack. That's an important thing to keep in mind; a successful "hit" does not necessarily mean you physically damaged your target. It just means that your attack was well placed and forced the target to exert themselves in such a way as to leave them vulnerable to further attacks. For example, instead of severing the target's arm, the attack merely grazes them leaving a minor cut.

But the attack did 25 points of damage! Why did it only "graze" the target?
Because the target has more than 25 hit points. Your attack forced them to exert a lot of energy to avoid the attack, but because of their combat skill, toughness, stamina and luck, they managed to avoid being seriously injured. However, because of this attack, they may not have the reserves to avoid your next attack. Perhaps you knocked them off balance or the attack left them so fatigued they lack the stamina to evade another attack. It's the DM's call on how they want to narrate the exact reason the blow didn't kill or wound the target.

Yeah, but what about "touch" attacks that rely on physical contact?
Making physical contact with a target is a lot different than striking them, so these types of attacks are the exception. If a touch attack succeeds, the attacker manages to make contact with their target.

If hit points and weapon damage don't always represent actual damage to the target, then what does it represent?
Think of the damage from an attack as more like a "threat level" rather than actual physical damage that transfers directly to the target's body. That is, the more damage an attack does, the harder it is to avoid serious injury. For example, an attack that causes 14 points of damage is more likely to wound the target than 3 points of damage (depending on how many hit points the target has left). The higher the damage, the greater the chance is that the target will become seriously injured. So, an attack that does 34 points of damage could be thought of as a "threat level of 34." If the target doesn't have the hit points to negate that threat, they become seriously injured.

Ok, but shouldn't armor reduce the amount of damage delivered from an attack?
It does reduce damage; by making it harder for an attack to cause serious injury. A successful hit against an armored target suggests that the attack may have circumvented the target's armor by striking in a vulnerable area.

What about poison and other types of non-combat damage?
Hit point loss from non-physical forms of damage represents the character spitting the poison out just in time before it takes full strength or perhaps the poison just wasn't strong enough to affect them drastically, but still weakens them. Again, it's the DMs call on how to narrate the reasons why the character avoids serious harm from the damage.

If hit points don't don't represent actual damage then how does that make sense with spells like Cure Serious Wounds and other forms of healing like healer kits with bandages?
Hit points do represent some physical damage, just not serious physical damage. Healing magic and other forms of healing still affect these minor wounds just as well as more serious wounds. For example, bandaging up minor cuts and abrasions helps the character rejuvenate and relieve the pain and/or fatigue of hit point loss. The key thing to remember is that it's an abstraction that allows the DM freedom to interpret and narrate it as they see fit.

What if my attack reduces the target to 0 or less hit points?
If a player is reduced to 0 or less hit points they are wounded. If a monster or NPC is reduce to 0 or less hit points they are killed.

Why are monsters killed immediately and not players?
Because unless the monsters are crucial to the story, it makes combat resolution much faster. It is assumed that players immediately execute a coup de grace on wounded monsters as a finishing move.

What if a character is wounded by poison or other types of non-physical damage?
If a character becomes wounded from non-combat damage they still receive the effects of being wounded, regardless if they show any physical signs of injury (i.e., internal injuries are still considered injuries).

Ok. I get it...but what happens once a character is wounded?
See below.
 

Damage and Dying

Once a character is reduced to 0 or less hit points, they start taking real damage. In other words, their reserves have run out and they can no longer avoid taking serious damage.

  1. Characters are fully operational as long as they have 1 hit point or more. They may have minor cuts, bruises, and superficial wounds, but they are are not impaired significantly. 
  2. Once they reach 0 or less hit points, they become Wounded (see below).That is, they have sustained a wound that impairs their ability to perform actions.
  3. If they reach a negative amount of hit points equal or greater than their Constitution score, they are Incapacitated. This means they are in critical condition and could possibly die.
  4. Characters will die if their hit points reach a negative amount greater than their Constitution score, plus their current level.

Unharmed: 1 hp or more
Wounded: 0 hp or less
Incapacitated: -(Constitution) to -(Constitution+Level)
Dead: Less than -(Constitution +Level)

Wounded
When the character reaches 0 or less hit points they become wounded. Wounded characters receive disadvantage on all attacks and saving throws until they heal back up to 1 hit point or more. This allows for a transitory stage between healthy and dying, without having to mess around with impairment rules while the character still has hit points left.

Incapacitated
Characters begin dying when they reach a negative amount of hit points equal to their Constitution score. At which point, they must make a DC 10 Constitution saving throw on each of their following turns (the disadvantage from being wounded does not apply for these saving throws).

If successful, the character remains dying, but their condition does not worsen.

If the saving throw fails, another DC 10 Constitution saving throw must be made. If that one fails, the character succumbs to their wounds and dies. If successful, the character stabilizes and is no longer dying.

Finally, if a dying character receives first aid or healing at any point, they immediately stabilize.

Dead
Characters will die if they reach a negative amount of hit points equal to their Constitution, plus their current level. Thus, if an 8th level character with a Constitution score of 12 is down to 4 hit points then takes 24 points of damage (reducing their hit points to -20) the attack kills them outright.

At home with a regular group.

Edition wars kill players,Dungeons and Dragons needs every player it can get.

It is so interesting getting a look and feel where everyone plays, for a lot of you I'm very envious that you get to play at a table in person. But I still really enjoy playing nonetheless on a VT (it's better than nothing). I'm very happy I found OpenRPG though.


I love the VT but because its not face to face people flake out a lot more, come up with crappy excuses and the final issue... the biggie... millions of players with just a few DMs (in limited timezones).

I really wish we had a much more advanced tool with features for sharing campaigns, settings and encounters. Not that im hinting at anything WotC... you hear that...

There is ONE D&D group local to me, however they are part of a university gaming group and they outright refuse to play with people who arent in the uni. I wish there was just one gaming store where I live where people could play and buy supplies. If I had the funds I would probably consider a startup project on it, take the limelight off Warhammer which is the only thing people have here. (FYI I live in a city, its not like its a small area or anything.) 



I'm a fresh GM for Fallout. Looking to start DMing for the Playtest soon, just looking for people. The time zone difference is a pain in the arse. OpenRPG seems to be O.k with sharing for me, I see there to be no issue. Than again, it is the on VT I have tried but it has not failed me yet. 

Drunk.


If  enjoyed drinking I would try this one. But I strongly dislike the taste. GF might enjoy it tho, I'll ask her 
I have played virtually but mostly I play tabletop in real life with real dice, paper char sheets and all.  
Its not as fun to DM over the internet I feel... I want to be able to see the players faces.



So you feel the lack of seeing the players reaction detaches from the game? That is interesting. To me it is no different than playing WoW on TeamSpeak/Vent/Skype or w/e OR playing Xboxlive (Not suggesting in anyway the gaming is the same) only cause I don't know any better.
I've been running it in between 4E and Pathfinder sessions. Usually it's one Pathfinder and one 4E night a week, but every second week or so we'll run a playtest for 5E instead.

Unfortunately we don't get as many players because it's unfriendly to new players and most of the established players find the game boring.
Khyber is a dark and dangerous place, full of flame and smoke, where ever stranger things lie dormant.
I've been running it in between 4E and Pathfinder sessions. Usually it's one Pathfinder and one 4E night a week, but every second week or so we'll run a playtest for 5E instead.

Unfortunately we don't get as many players because it's unfriendly to new players and most of the established players find the game boring.



I was wondering just that. Having come from not ever playing D&D and going straight to DDN and only hearing players personal experiences I had a feeling a lot of the 3.5e and 4e players were not very big on the DDN. I have been conflicted in trying to figure out which one to play out of them all. From what I hear 5e is a good combination of them both and since I have so much freedom with OpenRPG I can do any of them.
Mostly with my Friday night D&D group, though we schedule special Saturdays for it so as not to interrupt the ongoing campaign.

In memory of wrecan and his Unearthed Wrecana.

I DM for my (16yr old) son and his friends when we can fit it into a weekend. I also have a D&D encounters group, which decided to playtest D&DN instead... we meet for 1-2 hours, one night a week.

Both groups started with 3.5 or 4e (only the Encounters DM and I played previous editions), and both have been playing without battle maps and minatures having a blast doing it. 
I run the playtest with my usual group. We've made it to 2nd level pretty recently. 
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