Attacking creatures

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Hello, if someone could enlighten me on this matter I would be really grateful.!



Q: If I declare attack with, lets say, three creatures -> 2/2, 3/3 and 5/5 and my opponent declares block by one creature -> 7/7, can I say that my two attacking creatures, 5/5 and 3/3 will try to kill the blocking creature.



(Simply put: When I block, I can assign more than one creature to block attacking creature. Is anything like this possible when I attack? If so, how and when I have to say it?)



Thank you.! ;) 

The closest thing to that is banding. It lets some of your attacking creatures attack in a group, and any creature that blocks any of them blocks all of them.

It also has some unrelated changes to the damage assignment rules - it's kinda complicated.

You can't do what you're saying with vanilla (lacking abilities) creatures.
All Generalizations are Bad
The short answer is no.
STEP 1: Find your cousin STEP 2: Get your cousin in the cannon STEP: 3 Find another cousin
As the attacking player, you choose which creatures attack. The defending player chooses which creatures block and which creatures they block. If he decides, that multiple creature block one of your attacking creatures, you choose the order in which they will be dealt combat damage by your attacker. You have no say in the matter of blocker assignment, unless an effect specifically says otherwise (ex. Odric, Master Tactician). Also, normally one blocker can only block one attacker.

I have started up a Draft experiment in the Limited forums. If you're interested in Draft, come and check it out. The second packs have just been opened!

http://community.wizards.com/forum/limited-sealed-and-draft/threads/4206961

(It will go on for many more weeks, probably until end of July)

 

Once again aced the Rules Advisor test (Feb 2015). (I still make mistakes now and then, but who doesn't.)

 

"Simple questions" usually need rather complex answers, while complex questions often come down to no more than a simple "yes" or "no".

 

You declare your attackers.  Then, your opponent will declare blockers.  Generally a creature can only block one attacker unless it says otherwise (See Palace Guard).

Then as the attacker, you assign combat damage.  So say you attacked with your 2/2, 3/3 and 5/5 vanilla creatures and his 7/7 vanilla creature blocks your 5/5.  Well, unless you have any tricks like Giant Growth you would have to choose to have your 5/5 deal 5 damage to the defending creature and you would deal 5 damage to your opponent from the 2/2 and 3/3.

Now for instance, if he was the attacker and attacked with his 7/7, you could choose to block his creature with your 2/2, 3/3, AND 5/5 simultaneously.  Then as the attacker, he would assign combat damage.  He has to deal at least enough damage to a creature to be lethal before he can assign further damage to other sources, so he could choose to have his 7/7 deal 5 damage to your 5/5 and 2 damage to your 2/2....or 3 damage to your 3/3, 2 damage to your 2/2, and 2 damage to your 5/5.
In Magic there is always a way, depending on what format you are playing.  If you are just playing casually, creatures with the Provoke mechanic can accomplish what you are thinking.
STEP 1: Find your cousin STEP 2: Get your cousin in the cannon STEP: 3 Find another cousin
I say thank you all.! ;)
Figure it this way:

Normally,
Attacking creatures each invade your castle by a different door;
Each blocking creature must choose which door she will block;
More than one blocker may join and bar any given door.

But then,
Banding allows attackers to join and infiltrate the same door;
Palace Guard is able to split itself and bar many doors at once;
Provoke forces one blocker to a specific door.

Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.                        -Albert Einstein

 

So, you keep on voting, and you keep expecting different results from those elections?

How long have you tried this, over and over?

Ain't it time you reached a different conclusion about this whole mascarade?

Figure it this way:

Normally,
Attacking creatures each invade your castle by a different door;
Each blocking creature must choose which door she will block;
More than one blocker may join and bar any given door.

But then,
Banding allows attackers to join and infiltrate the same door;
Palace Guard is able to split itself and bar many doors at once;
Provoke forces one blocker to a specific door.


That's a really good analogy. I'm going to have to remember that one.

Standard Answer to all 5E rules questions: "Ask your DM."

In Magic there is always a way, depending on what format you are playing.  If you are just playing casually, creatures with the Provoke mechanic can accomplish what you are thinking.



Except not, because even with Provoke affecting a creature, that creature can normally only block one creature. So just because he has a 5/5 and a 3/3 both with provoke, that doesn't mean provoking the same 7/7 with both of them will have that creature block both of them. It will still only block one of them.

MTG Rules Advisor
 

In Magic there is always a way, depending on what format you are playing.  If you are just playing casually, creatures with the Provoke mechanic can accomplish what you are thinking.


Except not, because even with Provoke affecting a creature, that creature can normally only block one creature. So just because he has a 5/5 and a 3/3 both with provoke, that doesn't mean provoking the same 7/7 with both of them will have that creature block both of them. It will still only block one of them.

For that, you need Blaze of Glory or the less provokative Valor Made Real.

Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.                        -Albert Einstein

 

So, you keep on voting, and you keep expecting different results from those elections?

How long have you tried this, over and over?

Ain't it time you reached a different conclusion about this whole mascarade?

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