What race have you played mostly in your gaming life time?

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OK based on an interesting thread about "Human or Super Human?" on the player feedback forum and some very opposite experiences even from players like myself that have been playing since dinosaurs walked the earth I have to ask:


What race have you played the most throughout your whole game life span? Regardless of version or anything.


Optional if ya want to add: Why do you gravitate to that race?    

Hmm, it's a toss up between human and half-orc (from 3e onwards)...  I'll go with Half-Orc.

I guess I like fitting the misfit weirdo, as that's pretty much me, lol.  I'm big, I'm angry, I gather stares...  But, I'm not an accident like the half-orc is...  But yeah, it's a good fit for type casting so to speak. 

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Human


Mostly because everyone else wasn't picking human and it just seemed odd to be in adventures where most of the townfolk and city folks and NPCs are humans but there isn't a representative for that race in the group. Plus I liked role playing the wide eyed human sometimes so shocked by all the odd creatures and magic in the world.
Generally, I don't like to play the same race twice.  Once I play a race, I feel like I've gotten the experience of that race and try to find something different and exciting next time.  However, there is one racial paradigm that I love: fiendish races.  I can play Tielfings, half-fiends, and full-fledged fiends all day every day.  I once played a character that appeared to be human.  However, she was actually a Marilith who had lost her body in combat and survived by possessing a human.  She was human for many levels (until she reached a level where a marilith would be equal to a character of that level), until she had regained enough of her power to perform a ritual to create a new fiendish body for herself.  For some reason, I just love playing fiendish characters.
There are a great many problems that can be circumvented by players and DMs having a mature discussion about what the game is going to be like before they ever sit down together to play.

 

The answer really does lie in more options, not in confining and segregating certain options.

 

You really shouldn't speak for others.  You can't hear what someone else is saying when you try to put your words in their mouth.

 

Fencing & Swashbuckling as Armor.

D20 Modern Toon PC Race.

Mecha Pilot's Skill Challenge Emporium.

 

Save the breasts.

my longest running character was a spiker
Hutt.
I gravitate toward dwarves for my fighters and rangers.

For rogues I play human, elf, and halfling about equally.

I rarely play casters but when I do it is elf or human.

For me it is more about the particular character I want to portray.

Surly but competent- dwarf

Aloof and hard to read-elf

Whimsical and happy go lucky- halfling

Fast talking and generally likable-human.

Edition wars kill players,Dungeons and Dragons needs every player it can get.

I don't have too strong of a leader here, but Half-Human.  Can be half-elf or half-orc, or half-dwarf, but I seem to like half-humans.  They're like a license to have mostly human psychology while breaking human limits physically, in one way or another.
Seriously, though, you should check out the PbP Haven. You might also like Real Adventures, IF you're cool.
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By number of characters, dwarf.

By time, human.  The 2E character I played for 10 years was human.
The difference between madness and genius is determined only by degrees of success.
Without a doubt, Human.

Of course, spending most of '96-2006 playing systems where there's nothing but humans?  That tends to skew the average.
In 2e, Elf.  In 3rd/Pathfinder, Human.  In 4e, Human and Half-Elf split time.  In Next, Human.  In just about every other RPG ever made that isn't D&D, still human.

So, first of all, I do not want to be ugly.  This is a requirement.  Say whatever you want about me because of it, but it is a fact--I will not PC as an ugly character.  

In 2e, I played elves because being a human did absolutely nothing at all, while being an Elf boosted my AC.  I very much enjoy playing that guy that doesn't get hit, so it seemed perfect.  Elves in 2e were pretty much described as just "pretty humans," so, bam, every single PC I made for 2e was an elf.

In 3rd, Humans got a feat and skills (and in Pathfinder, a stat bonus), so being one was actually useful.  Given my love for building characters and intricate, interlocking abilities, having an extra feat was always way more valuable than +2/-2 to attributes and the skill was just gravy.  And yeah, humans can run the gamut appearancewise, so plenty of aesthetic customization available.

In 4e, Humans were still pretty awesome, so yeah, definitely played them sometimes.  But if Paragon was happening, holy hell was Half-Elf amazingly great--taking another class's at-will was my absolute favorite racial mechanic ever (well, no, I loved the mechanic and hated it was attached to a race and not something else, but whatev).  While the Elves in 4e were drawn really horsey and ugly, the Half-Elves were the new "pretty humans," so yeah, I played them, too.  Plus, the dude in the half-elf racial portrait is one of the most appealing "I would play as that guy" peices of art in any D&D book ever (which is less a testament to the awesomeness of that picture than it is to the general terribleness of all previous art).  If I ever was in a D&D group that I felt wouldn't be uncomfortable with my PCing a female character, I'd have been willing to be a Tiefling as well, since they look like Draenei from Warcraft and I find them oddly compelling--but the Tiefling dudes looked horrible, so that was out of the question.

I don't know, I just immerse better in (near) human characters, and I know I like the looks of humans, since they can be so wildly varied.
Considering how long I've played where there were few options, I'd probably say Dwarf.  No particular reason, though.

As soon as Eberron hit the shelves, though, it's been almost all shifters and warforged.  Shifters because I'm a furry and that's about as close as I can get, Warforged because, well ...

I'm chronically ill.  Permanently ill.  Incurably ill.  I have bodily organs that are simply ceasing to function, for absolutely no reason.  They're just stopping, and nobody knows why.  The human body is an inefficient and wasteful design.  All we're doing from the moment we're born is fallling apart.  Diseases, constant maintenance in the form of eating and sleeping, irreparable injuries, permanent disfigurement and crippling.  All things Warforged don't have to deal with.  Warforged are virtually ideal for me.
Another day, another three or four entries to my Ignore List.
Elves, particularly High Elves.

I greatly enjoy spells and the magic system in DnD (Vancian or 3.x Sorceror spell slots), so elves were always a good fit.

That being said, I also sometimes enjoy playing oddball characters, notably a half-orc bard, an evil character in a good party, and a gnome sorcerer (still the only gnome PC that I've actually seen anyone play at my gaming table).
Given the number of games I've played where human is the only option I'd have to go with human.

D&D:  Anything but elf.  I just loathed them especially mid-end 2e where per the fluff they were the perfect race.  They made the best weapons/armor/buildings/magic/warriors/thieves etc.  It did not matter what they did, they were better than everyone at it.   

Shadowrun:  Trolls. 
Earthdawn: humans
TMNT:  Cheetah

Pretty much everything else I can think of off hand humans were the only option.  Sure in super hero games I could be an alien or demi-god or whatever but those bored me.   
Half-Elf when I identify with the character.
Gnome because I love them

But generally I like to try new races, or old races I never played before.

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Halfling. I played more Halflings than anything else during the AD&D era. 

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Humans by a far margin.  I can only identify with a human psychology.  If and when I play any other race, it is just a human in a rubber suit anyway.
Elves. Elves, and more elves. Only three of my characters were not elves, and one was forced on me. The reason? Love the flavour an elf has, more than anything I love trying to think as if I could live for centuries.
I've had a good handful of my characters be human with a Bloodline or Heritage feat (usually draconic) from 3.5 but recently I've been on a Shifter spree. Shifter is the next race I'd like to see Core, but I'm by no means expecting it.
What race have you played the most throughout your whole game life span? Regardless of version or anything.

Optional if ya want to add: Why do you gravitate to that race?



In BECMI/1E, I played humans-- beacause I wanted a physically strong/tough character and have never cared much for tolkein races that aren't elves.

In 4E, I have played a Longtooth Shifter for the longest, but Warforged (often refluffed as a Golem) has been the race for the greatest percentage of my characters.

I like the bestial/nature bent of the Shifter, and a Warforged as an animated statue or suit of armor or nature golem/mini-treant is always cool IMO (current 4E character is a Wilden).
At first it was humans and dwarves. Humans because of extra skills and feats (3.5) and dwarves because I enjoyed the cultural background.


However I soon shifted to the more savage races. My favourite is minotaur and I especially enjoyed the focus the gave them in 4th. If I were to put a race by hours played then that falls to the Half-ogre from savage species takes the cake. I played every thing from a barbarian to a monk and even a sorcerer (not a good one mind you) with them. My favourite was a fighter who wanted to sing in taverns but always got kick out.

Anyway, I'd like to see a savage race, maybe a new bread, get some focus thing time round.     
I've played more Genasi than anything else, mostly because of how many different things you can do with the race with all those different X Souls.
D&D:  Anything but elf.  I just loathed them especially mid-end 2e where per the fluff they were the perfect race.  They made the best weapons/armor/buildings/magic/warriors/thieves etc.  It did not matter what they did, they were better than everyone at it.

Hehe, I have the same experience with elves since 2nd ed.

I play humans, because they have more interesting roleplaying opportunity for me.
From a racial point of view, they have more allies, more enemies and overall more adversity. I love to imagine a human living in a world where he is not the apex predator and where long living intelligent races consider them like intriguing short lived vermin.
How the humans consider gods as they are already confronted to a lot of powerful long living races, including dragons ? Why would they be more impressed by gods ? If one atomic bomb is enough to ruin your world, the idea that something can throw at you a thousand atomic bombs makes little difference.
How humans evolve in a world where a lot has already been discovered by older races ? In the real world, a large part of humanity have evolved into people who think that they can be "winners" individually and then favors short term thinking (less than one generation). It's not possible in a D&D world with all the parameters involved.
Human is the most dynamic race in D&D, as it has something to prove to the world. I think humanity wants to go in every directions and challenge every long lived races they think are considering them inferiors, and I think that humanity consider this as its defining racial trait.
For me D&D humans are the most unique and interesting race with warforged.

Sometimes, I play warforged.
Warforged don't care about most things that define natural races, and they are farther than humans behind the other races. But they have most of the same limits as half-races, their concepts is about isolated individuals concerned by acceptation. I call them the "adolescent races", and they bore me as well as nice vampires and nice drows, the adolescent monsters. Warforged are interesting because they skip all the angst part Tongue Out

From my point of view, human entry should be the one with the longer fluff text, as time and culture is less limiting for them. But when I see how humans are treated, I feel there's a preconception that foreign thinking in D&D only concerns non-human races.

I think it's the reason why I don't like the FR setting, humans are not acting like humans. After the mess of the avatars, many humans would have rejected the status quo concerning gods influence in the realms, something like the renaissance in europe. But in the FR, all races are treated like sheep.
Half-Elf

My first character in 1e, 2e, 3e, 3.5, and 4e were half elven rangers. I also like half-even warlocks and fighters.

I gravitate to oddball characters and characters that play against type. I also like playing the "doesn't belong with humans nor elves" angle and having to be charimatic or intimidating to avoid being bullied or discriminated.

Orzel, Halfelven son of Zel, Mystic Ranger, Bane to Dragons, Death to Undeath, Killer of Abyssals, King of the Wilds. Constitution Based Class for Next!

Dwarf

Almost exclusively.  I also gravitate to the healer or paladin.
This not only applys to D&D, but any MMORG that I play.

"The turning of the tide always begins with one soldier's decision to head back into the fray"

Monstrous Humanoids and the like (Minotaur, Bugbear, Half-Giants, Ogre-mage, Dryad, Half-Undead, etc)

To me an adventuring character needs to be extra-ordinairy. Some distinguish themselves by skill and aptitudes, some by their storylines and origins. That is why I tend to go towards monstrous races when creating a PC. That being said, most of my NPCs (as a DM) are of the basic races of the setting.

I like the fact that many monster templates had secial abilities that were not really powerfull by themselves but did bring alot of flavor in PCs. Having too many monstrous NPCs just brings down the extra-ordinairy out of those races.
Human
Humans because they tend to be just that much better in most cases. If not a human, I try for half orc, dwarf or  recently elf. I don't think I've ever done a small race. I often try to get some sort of giant/half giant or minotaur if possible when playing a warrior race. 

Longest running character was a half-orc rogue/barbarian. 

"In a way, you are worse than Krusk"                               " As usual, Krusk comments with assuredness, but lacks the clarity and awareness of what he's talking about"

"Can't say enough how much I agree with Krusk"

"Your advice is the worst"


I play humans, because they have more interesting roleplaying opportunity for me.
From a racial point of view, they have more allies, more enemies and overall more adversity. I love to imagine a human living in a world where he is not the apex predator and where long living intelligent races consider them like intriguing short lived vermin.
How the humans consider gods as they are already confronted to a lot of powerful long living races, including dragons ? Why would they be more impressed by gods ? If one atomic bomb is enough to ruin your world, the idea that something can throw at you a thousand atomic bombs makes little difference.
How humans evolve in a world where a lot has already been discovered by older races ? In the real world, a large part of humanity have evolved into people who think that they can be "winners" individually and then favors short term thinking (less than one generation). It's not possible in a D&D world with all the parameters involved.
Human is the most dynamic race in D&D, as it has something to prove to the world. I think humanity wants to go in every directions and challenge every long lived races they think are considering them inferiors, and I think that humanity consider this as its defining racial trait.
For me D&D humans are the most unique and interesting race with warforged.




That is an awesome write for why to play a human.  If I ever get to play instead of run D&D again I think I am going to go with human for my next character.   
OK based on an interesting thread about "Human or Super Human?" on the player feedback forum and some very opposite experiences even from players like myself that have been playing since dinosaurs walked the earth I have to ask:


What race have you played the most throughout your whole game life span? Regardless of version or anything.


Optional if ya want to add: Why do you gravitate to that race?    




Human, followed by elf.

Those are both races that I have always liked.  Dwarf, gnome, halfling and half-orc I actively dislike.  Half-elf I also like, but not as much as the other two.  
Humans mostly,with a sprinkle of elves and half elves. A avariel too ,once.
DM: Products of MY Imagination ©. Since 1986.
The more bestial races (esp. goblin and gnoll) becuase of the interest points of their culture compared to mankind. Also, these races look like an intrest to play to me with the sneakeyness of goblins and the power of the gnolls and their society. Human is interesting though other races seem interesting to experiance playing. Besides, I think these races should get proper write-up treatment that's balanced with the rest of the races and their guidelines.
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Human, followed by any sub-race of human, then anything exotic (non-standard races). But my overall favorite is the warforged.

Don't really have a favorite. I like to try out new races/classes and I've tried them all at one point.

Now I DO have dislikes. Dwarves I hate, but mostly because of how one player I know runs them. Second are Kenders... I murder every one I see with a smile on my face and joy in my heart! Innocent 

I tend to gravitate away from humans as I've already been one for the majority of my life. (outside of game)
I also like to try out  new and different races, particularly when I know that I'll be in for a short campaign.

There is an odd fondness that I have for half-humans, goblins, kobolds and any race from Eberron.

Though this wasn't the case in 3.5. The extra skill points and lack of a negative stat that Humans recieved was almost too good to pass up.
OK Unofficial and unscientific results so far. I gave a full point to anyone who made it clear what race they had played the most and a 1/2 point if they had a backup. For those that couldn't break it down I gave a 1/4 point to each one listed if you stated 4 races and 1/3 point to each if you listed 3 races. This created some fun numbers but the upshot is by a large margin folks play humans a lot (I am shocked) and the second and third place were the historically famous Dwarves and Elves.


Humans    13.4
Dwarf       3.83
Elf            3.5
Half Elves  2.75
Half Orc    2.25
Shifter      2.08
Halfling     1.25
Genasi      1
Tiefling     1
Goblin       0.75
Minotaur   0.58
Warforged 0.58
Gnoll         0.5
Gnome      0.5
Bugbear    0.25
Half Giant  0.25
Undead     0.25 (Revenant, Vampire, etc...)
Kobold      0.25                
OK Unofficial and unscientific results so far. I gave a full point to anyone who made it clear what race they had played the most and a 1/2 point if they had a backup. For those that couldn't break it down I gave a 1/4 point to each one listed if you stated 4 races and 1/3 point to each if you listed 3 races. This created some fun numbers but the upshot is by a large margin folks play humans a lot (I am shocked) and the second and third place were the historically famous Dwarves and Elves.


Humans    13.4
Dwarf       3.83
Elf            3.5
Half Elves  2.75
Half Orc    2.25
Shifter      2.08
Halfling     1.25
Genasi      1
Tiefling     1
Goblin       0.75
Minotaur   0.58
Warforged 0.58
Gnoll         0.5
Gnome      0.5
Bugbear    0.25
Half Giant  0.25
Undead     0.25 (Revenant, Vampire, etc...)
Kobold      0.25                



If we're keeping score, can I change my answer to NOT include Human-- I only ever played them because they are a great blank slate to bolt a lot of character concepts on, what with the high stats and level limits they had in earlier editions. This continued with the extra feat, at-will, and skill in 4E.

I find humans in D&D very boring. I will always choose a more thematic (to me) option, if it is available.
Elves!

Elven Wizards!

I have always played elven wizards to the point where my players were getting sick of it.

"oh god, not another elven wizard".

"Will you please play something ELSE?"
Halflings, almost always.

It's not all about physical strength, or tricking people.  Sometimes you just want to stand back from it all, and have a cup of tea.
The metagame is not the game.
Mostly Human, but I've done High Elves and Eladrin.

When I did High Elf I did a series of characters of different classes and backgrounds who were all High Elves, because I liked the race and wanted to explore it in a variety of different ways.

When I did Eladrin I did a series of characters of different classes and backgrounds who were all Eladrin, because I liked the race and wanted to explore it in a variety of different ways.

All of those experiences have been enjoyable... but I HATE the idea of fixed "superior" Race/Class combinations. 

The more Classes one Race can play the more I'll enjoy that Race and the more likely I will be to play it in Next.   
Humans.

Not so many dwarves, elves, half-elves or half-orcs.  I've only played a handful of these, all combined.

My longest running 4e PC was a tiefling warlord.  

Had a wild idea to give genasi a try but my buddy had that covered; he played a genasi firesoul re-flavored as a Djinn (a race from the Clash of the Titans re-make).  

Halflings, almost always.

It's not all about physical strength, or tricking people.  Sometimes you just want to stand back from it all, and have a cup of tea.

Halflings are the race I've played the least.  

Played one for about *half* a session once .
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