Playtest Report: Character Creation

Had two of my players do character creation. Very interesting input from both of them. One of them comes from a heavy roleplay background(3.5e and other d20 systems) the other started with 4e and has since moved into other games. There was only one really big issue that I found, underlined below.

Note: Moved this from other forum. 

Total Time: 1 hour for character creation, mainly due to selecting spells and one player reading the entire Halfling Lore.

So the Feedback from the Players just from character creation:

Halfling Lore disappointment
Hafling race is a lot more Lord of the Rings than previous edition lore. The d20 gamer has always played Halflings and doesn't really like the direction the lore is going. "Before they tried to differentiate themselves from Hobbits." Mainly tied with the details about Quiet Shires, laid back personalities, and no leadership.

Background Praise
 The 4e gamer really liked the backgrounds system, he's playing the cleric and really likes the idea that the temple will help him out when he is in danger.

Character Sheet Redundancy
With the design of the character sheet, why is race listed twice? There was a lot of empty space that my players didn't use. For example what is the difference between Character Description Race and Race Benefits?

Where is Searing Light?
Searing Light is not listed on the front page of the Spell Packet. The cleric didn't realize the spell was actually in the packet until I found it for him.

Character Sheet should have a place for Sub-race
The halfling player thought it might be good to have a sub-race section on the character sheet.

Hiding Behind Players as Lightfoot
The Halfling player really likes the lightfoot ability to hide behind people, she actually likes to hide and leave the other players to die back when we played 3.5e. So even though it is to the party's detriment the player is very interested.

How many spells to start with?
Starting spells, how many spells does a lvl 1 cleric actually get when to start with? I know how many they can use, but there doesn't seem to be a mention of it. My players and I couldn't find any mention of it.

Skill points vs Skill Training Dilemma 
This is a big one. Skill training over points is alienating my d20 player and their husband. They like advancement with Skills as well as the ability to customize what they want to use. They feel that customization was lost for ease of use for new players. They would prefer to spread out skill points to different skills rather than stick to only a handful of skills. 

Fragility = More Strategy
The 4e player likes how there is a lot less survivability of the characters, ie lower hit points and AC. He feels that the game will be more strategic than 4 was. He thinks he will go in less guns a blazing.

Cannot be Proficient with Race Weapon
The High Elf Cleric wants to be able to use Long Swords and Bows. He likes that he has a bonus to damage but can't understand why he cannot be proficient in the weapon. I think I will give him a Long Bow to test out if the weapon proficiency bonus is actually worth it or not.

Conclusion:
My players are pretty excited to play the game though schedules are all over the place. Waiting to hear back from the Wizard and Fighter of the Group, one has only played 4e whereas the other is completely new to the game.
Ant Farm
Nice breakdown.

For the doubled space I used the front to list the names of abilities and the back to put the mechanics of those abilities for quick reference.

Edition wars kill players,Dungeons and Dragons needs every player it can get.

For the cleric spells, page 2 of the classes file under the "Spell Preparation" heading details this.

You prepare one spell for each spell slot you have, plus your Domain spell, plus turn undead. You pick the spells you want to prepare from the cleric spell list, and it is my understanding that you pick which spells from the cleric list you want each time you have a long rest. Remember that these prepared spells function kind of like the Sorcerer known spells in 3.5; you can cast the same spell more than once or not at all before your next long rest.
I agree with alot of what you said. I am enthused about the fragility part of the game but am weary as to how it will continue into the later tier. Kind of the third edition dilemma where a character starts relatively weak and soon transcends into godhood. (Keep in my mind I loved 3e, but that was one of the things about the system that seemed off)
Second Character creation session involved two newbies. Only one thing really sprang up.

Rolling For Stats, fun...
Neither really knew how to roll dice for stats. Wizard's stats were all between 14 and 16 with one 12, which she upped to a 14 with class and race bonuses, meaning she has a nice Jack of all trades wizard, who can also hit stuff pretty hard. Fighter had three 17's in his statline after factoring in his attribute bonus.

Great Customizability
Both got really into making their characters. The Wizard took Sage and Survivor, whereas the fighter took Soldier and Guardian. I still think Guardian is a little bit underpowered, but we'll see when gameplay starts. The Cleric really liked this when he started as well, he is a Necromancer and cant wait till lvl 3 for his skeleton bodyguard.

Character Creation still same time
Time was just as fast as the older players, in fact the fighter just took the suggested equipment and cut 10 mins off of the 1hr creation time.

Ant Farm
My experiences were fairly simlar. Most people had taken the time to read the classes before hand. So on the day, the only one I had any real difficulty in was the rogue, and that was because I had to handwrite the character sheet down.

The sheer number of abilities that was had confused some though. Out of a party of 1 fighters,a Sorc, a wizard and a Rogue, the rogue had the most trouble being a newer player. Though then again I found it frustrating having to divert from my DMing abilities to explain what he could do.
My Rogue player is now afraid that its going to TPK in 5 seconds since she is at 8 health and most attacks she has do 1d6+3 at least damage.

We'll have to see, right now I only have the first encounter planned, an easy encounter against Kobolds. I want to get them to feel for the game before they delve into the deeper waters. Such as the actual playtest adventure.
Ant Farm
My Rogue player is now afraid that its going to TPK in 5 seconds since she is at 8 health and most attacks she has do 1d6+3 at least damage.

We'll have to see, right now I only have the first encounter planned, an easy encounter against Kobolds. I want to get them to feel for the game before they delve into the deeper waters. Such as the actual playtest adventure.

What encounters are you running?  Just curious.

8 HP Rogue must be first level.  Only if they are constantly going up against creatures 3x their level or more should they be getting such high damage output against them.
 What encounters are you running?  Just curious.

8 HP Rogue must be first level.  Only if they are constantly going up against creatures 3x their level or more should they be getting such high damage output against them.



They are all starting out at first level. As far as the encounters, I am mostly going to use the numbers in the beastiary with a few encounters from the 2 packet adventure.
Ant Farm
They are all starting out at first level. As far as the encounters, I am mostly going to use the numbers in the beastiary with a few encounters from the 2 packet adventure.

nodnod

Yeah.  My group learned to fear high level creatures fast when they walked into an orc den (although, to be honest, they still handled every orc encounter relatively easily - no deaths at least).

All-in-all, playing with fear is probably smart... honestly, who in their right mind would head into so obviously hostile areas with creatures quite capable of killing them without being cautious?  I'd call it good roleplay.  Players shouldn't think of death as just an inconvenient reroll of a new character all the time.
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