GET A JOB! (in your game)

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I obtained all of the skills and non-weapon proficiencies from Valdark's post "Skillful Blend of 3e and 4e". If you haven't dropped in that thread and given feedback, I highly recommend doing so. Valdark's thread was the inspiration for this thread. Also, the second post in this current thread will contain a list of all skills and NWPs from 1st ed all the way to the current list in D&D Next.

One of the things I like best about D&D Next is backgrounds. I especially like the ones that are "jobs".  I took a look at all NWPs and skills and made a list of all that sounded like "jobs". There were many, many overlaps so I removed duplicates. There were a lot of other ones that were rewordings of the same thing (such as boat pilot, sailor and seaman) so I made them into whatever wording I felt sounded best. I also changed some of them to sound better, such as changing history to historian and groomer to barber. From 5th ed, I only added in the artisan and commoner jobs, the other backgrounds and skills were not looked at.

To explain a few of the more odd ones, I changed fungus identification into mycologist, aka "study of mushrooms". I actually know a mycologist, so it's a legit job! (I call him the shroom doctor) I haven't changed any of the lore or knowledge skills into jobs yet, other than architect. It was too cool to pass up. I am sure I will add more lore and knowledge skills as jobs later. Weather sense I changed into meteorologist. 

What do you guys think about this list? Are there things you would add, remove or combine? One in particular I was wondering about was blacksmith, armorsmith and weaponsmith. Couldn't one do all three, or perhaps could there be a blacksmith skill with a specialty you could choose, armorsmith or weaponsmith, and only in the one area you are specialized in can you make masterwork or above? Should we keep the three separate? How would you run blacksmith/weaponsmith/armorsmith?

Some of these jobs would fit perfectly into commoner and artisan from D&D Next. Others could be individual backgrounds in their own right. Even others could potentially be created into categories in DDN (categories such as commoner and artisan). Some of these could really add depth to other backgrounds, such as one with the Noble background also being able to choose a "hobby" such as poet.

I am keeping this list here and updated for several reasons. One reason is so that my players and I can get ideas for PC and NPC jobs and backgrounds. The original list I have compiled contains 80 jobs below. I will add any that come from skills and NWPs to this list. Any you guys come up with that aren't directly from skills or NWPs I will put in a separate list below the first.


Acrobat
Alchemist
Animal Handler/Trainer
Appraiser
Architect
Armorsmith
Astrologer
Astronomer
Athlete
Barber
Basketweaver
Blacksmith
Boatwright
Bookbinder
Bowyer/fletcher
Brewer
Calligrapher
Cartographer
Charioteer
Civil engineer
Cobbler
Cook/Chef
Cryptographer
Dancer
Deep diver
Diplomat
Engineer
Falconer
Farmer
Fisher
Florist
Gambler
Gem Cutter
Goldsmith/Silversmith
Gymnast
Herbalist
Historian
Hunter
Innkeeper
Jeweler
Juggler
Landscape gardener
Limner/painter
Linguist
Lip reader
Locksmith
Masseur
Merchant
Messenger
Meteorologist
Miner
Musician
Mycologist
Navigator
Paper-maker
Performance Artist
Poet
Potter
Sailor
Scribe
Sculpter
Seamstress/tailor
Servant
Silk maker
Singer
Smelter
Stable master
Stonemason
Tanner/Leatherworker
Teamster/freighter
Tightrope walker
Trader/barterer
Trapmaker
Trapper/furrier
Ventriloquist
Wagon master
Weaponsmith
Weaver
Woodsman
Woodworker/carpenter


Edit: Here is another 24 I got from the list HocusSmokus linked to. Surprsingly, most of those listed were duplicates or just NWPs that I can't turn into a job. But, I was able to get quite a few more. There are even more than this, but a lot of them are even further stretches than a few far stretches I've done.


Actor
Beggar
Bureaucrat
Butcher
Cheesemaker
Clockmaker
Clothesmaker
Detective
Dream Interpretetor
Fortune Teller
Glassblower
Hypnotist
Lawyer
Metalworker
Orator
Pest Exterminator
Philosopher
Politician
Soothsayer
Tattoo Artist
Toxicologist
Tracker
Vetinarian
Winemaker


Do you have an opinion on what campaign settings should be printed in D&D Next? If so, please cast your votes in this poll! Poll: What campaign settings do you want to see printed in D&D Next?

In the "because I can" category, I created a d100 list of jobs/trades of my favorite 100 compiled so far. Later, I fully intend to break everything into categories but that is going to take quite a bit of time.

1     Acrobat
2     Actor
3     Alchemist
4     Animal Handler/Trainer
5     Appraiser
6     Architect
7     Armorsmith
8     Astrologer
9     Astronomer
10   Barber
11   Basketweaver
12   Beggar
13   Blacksmith
14   Boatwright
15   Bookbinder
16   Bowyer/fletcher
17   Brewer
18   Bureaucrat
19   Butcher
20   Calligrapher
21   Cartographer
22   Charioteer
23   Cheesemaker
24   Civil engineer
25   Clockmaker
26   Clothesmaker
27   Cobbler
28   Cook/Chef
29   Cryptographer
30   Dancer
31   Detective
32   Diplomat
33   Dream Interpretetor
34   Engineer
35   Falconer
36   Farmer
37   Fisher
38   Florist
39   Fortune Teller
40   Gambler
41   Gem Cutter
42   Glassblower
43   Goldsmith/Silversmith
44   Gymnast
45   Herbalist
46   Historian
47   Hunter
48   Hypnotist
49   Innkeeper
50   Jeweler
51   Juggler
52   Landscape gardener
53   Lawyer
54   Limner/painter
55   Linguist
56   Lip reader
57   Locksmith
58   Masseur
59   Merchant
60   Messenger
61   Metalworker
62   Miner
63   Musician
64   Navigator
65   Orator
66   Paper-maker
67   Performance Artist
68   Pest Exterminator
69   Philosopher
70   Poet
71   Politician
72   Potter
73   Sailor
74   Scribe
75   Sculpter
76   Seamstress/tailor
77   Servant
78   Silk maker
79   Singer
80   Smelter
81   Soothsayer
82   Stable master
83   Stonemason
84   Tanner/Leatherworker
85   Tattoo Artist
86   Teamster/freighter
87   Tightrope walker
88   Toxicologist
89   Tracker
90   Trader/barterer
91   Trapmaker
92   Trapper/furrier
93   Ventriloquist
94   Vetinarian
95   Wagon master
96   Weaponsmith
97   Weaver
98   Winemaker
99   Woodsman
100 Woodworker/carpenter






This post is a list of many skills and NWPs from different editions. Hocus-Smokus has a link in this thread to even more NWPs if you are curious.

Show

1st Edition

Oriental Adventures


Artisan


Armorer
Blacksmith
Bowyer
Brewer
Carpenter
Civil engineer
Herbalist
Jeweler
Masseur
Navigator
Paper-maker
Potter
Seamstress/tailor
Silk maker
Stonemason
Tanner/Leatherworker
Weaponsmith
Weaver



Barbarian



Chanting
Fire building
Running
Signaling
Snare building
Sound imitation
Survival
Tracking



Common



Agriculture
Animal handling
Cooking
Dance
Fishing
Gaming
Horsemanship
Hunting
Husbandry
Iaijutsu
Juggling
Music
Reading/writing
Sailing craft
Singing
Small water craft
Swimming



Court



Calligraphy
Etiquette
Falconry
Flower arranging
Heraldry
Landscape gardening
Noh
Origami
Painting
Poetry



Dungeoneer's Survival Guide



Craftsman Proficiencies


Animal Trainer Wis
Armorer Int
Blacksmith Str
Boatwright Int
Bowyer/Fletcher Dex
Carpenter Str
Gem Cutter Dex
Leatherworker Int
Miner Wis
Potter Dex
Smelter Int
Stonemason Str
Weaponsmith Int
Weaver Int


Adventuring Proficiencies


Animal Noise Wis
Blind-fighting NA
Boating Wis
Direction Sense Wis
Endurance NA
Fire-building Wis
Fishing Wis
Fungus Identification Int
Healing Wis
Mountaineering NA
Riding Wis
Rope Use Dex
Slow Respiration NA
Sound Analysis Wis
Swimming Str



Wilderness Survival Guide


Alertness Wis
Animal Handling Wis
Animal Lore Int
Blind-fighting NA
Boating Wis
Charioteering Dex
Direction Sense Wis
Endurance NA
Fire-building Wis
Fishing Wis
Foraging Int
Healing Wis
Hunting Wis
Mountaineering NA
Plant Lore Int
Riding, airborne Wis
Riding, land-based Wis
Rope Use Dex
Running Con
Survival, cold NA
Survival, desert NA
Survival, heat NA
Swimming Str
Tracking NA
Weather Sense Wis



2e

Secondary Skills


Armorer
Bowyer/fletcher
Farmer
Fisher
Forester
Gambler
Groom
Hunter
Jeweler
Leather worker
Limner/painter
Mason
Miner
Navigator
Sailor
Scribe
Shipwright
Tailor/weaver
Teamster/freighter
Trader/barterer
Trapper/furrier
Weapon smith
Woodworker/carpenter
No skill of measurable worth


Non-weapon proficiencies (skills and powers expanded list)


Agriculture
Animal handling
Animal training
Blacksmithing
Boat piloting
Brewing
Carpentry
Cobbling
Cooking
Dancing
Deep diving
Engineering
Etiquette
Fire-building
Fishing
Gaming
Heraldry
Leather working
Mining
Modern languages
Musical instrument
Navigation
Orienteering
Painting
Pottery
Riding, airborne
Riding, land
Rope use
Sculpting
Singing
Seamanship
Stone masonry
Swimming
Tailoring
Weather knowledge
Weaving


Ancient history
Ancient languages
Astrology
Healing
Herbalism
Local history
Reading/writing
Religion
Spellcraft


Appraising
Blind-fighting
Cryptography
Disguise
Forgery
Gem cutting
Juggling
Jumping
Reading lips
Set snares
Tightrope walking
Throwing
Tumbling
Ventriloquism


Animal lore
Armorer
Bowyer/fletcher
Charioteering
Gaming
Endurance
Hunting
Mountaineering
Running
Survival
Tracking
Weapon smithing
Astronomy



3.5 skills

Appraise
Balance
Bluff
Climb
Concentration
Craft
Decipher script
Diplomacy
Disable Device
Disguise
Escape Artist
Forgery
Gather info
Handle animal
Heal
Hide
Intimidate
Jump
Knowledge:arcana, architecture, dungeoneering, geography, history, local, nature, nobility, religion, the planes
Listen
Move silently
Open lock
Perform
Profession
Ride
Search
Sense motive
Sleight of hand
Speak language
Spellcraft
Spot
Survival
Swim
Tumble
Use magic device
Use rope


4e skills

Acrobatics
Arcana
Athletics
Bluff
Diplomacy
Dungeoneering
Endurance
Heal
History
Insight
Intimidate
Nature
Perception
Religion
Stealth
Streetwise
Thievery

D&D Next (Playtest Packet 2)





















































































































Insight
Spot
Survival
Open Locks
Sleight of Hand
Stealth
Animal Handling
Bluff
Diplomacy
Intimidate
Streetwise
Find and Remove Traps
Forbidden Lore
Geographical Lore
Heraldic Lore
Historical Lore
Local Lore
Magical Lore
Natural Lore
Planar Lore
Professional Lore
Religious Lore
Societal Lore
Underdark Lore
Undead Lore

 

Do you have an opinion on what campaign settings should be printed in D&D Next? If so, please cast your votes in this poll! Poll: What campaign settings do you want to see printed in D&D Next?
Most of those aren't real jobs, D&D-wise.  If you're trying to make a list of medievalish jobs, take a look at the Domesday Book and throw in some criminals.
Most of those aren't real jobs, D&D-wise.  If you're trying to make a list of medievalish jobs, take a look at the Domesday Book and throw in some criminals.



While I don't disagree with you, I think they are close enough for a character concept to make money or have a hobby if they don't need to work for money.

I do like the things I see in this book you linked to. While I run devils as if they were evil lawyers, I've never thought to have actual lawyers in a D&D game. That needs to change! My favorite in the list is Chicken Butcher. That is a character concept that has to happen!
Do you have an opinion on what campaign settings should be printed in D&D Next? If so, please cast your votes in this poll! Poll: What campaign settings do you want to see printed in D&D Next?

This post is a list of all skills and NWPs from different editions.




You're missing 100+ NWPs from 2E.

Since I'm in no mood to list them all, HERE is a site that does it for me.    




This post is a list of all skills and NWPs from different editions.




You're missing 100+ NWPs from 2E.

Since I'm in no mood to list them all, HERE is a site that does it for me.    






Thanks! That's quite a list there. I'll incorporate them tomorrow, hopefully. I'm already seeing some stuff I like. Cheesemaker, beggar and fortune teller to name a few!
Do you have an opinion on what campaign settings should be printed in D&D Next? If so, please cast your votes in this poll! Poll: What campaign settings do you want to see printed in D&D Next?
Perhaps "Trade skills" would be a more apt title?

Edition wars kill players,Dungeons and Dragons needs every player it can get.

Perhaps "Trade skills" would be a more apt title?



I was considering a more appropriate title, as they are jobs, trade skills, hobbies and whatever else. However, are we even able to change a thread title? I am unable to find a way if so.
Do you have an opinion on what campaign settings should be printed in D&D Next? If so, please cast your votes in this poll! Poll: What campaign settings do you want to see printed in D&D Next?
Perhaps "Trade skills" would be a more apt title?



I was considering a more appropriate title, as they are jobs, trade skills, hobbies and whatever else. However, are we even able to change a thread title? I am unable to find a way if so.


Not that I am aware of. 

Edition wars kill players,Dungeons and Dragons needs every player it can get.

It seems like a pretty huge list.  Won't that intimidate new players?

Can you categorize them and perhaps put them into a smaller list?  The backgrounds listed in the last packet had examples like that (Artisan) which I feel makes it much easier on players and lends to that faster character creation Mearls was talking about in the penny arcade podcast. 
Please collect and update the DND Next Community Wiki Page with your ideas and suggestions!
Take a look at my clarified ability scores And also my Houserules relevent to DNDNext
It seems like a pretty huge list.  Won't that intimidate new players?

Can you categorize them and perhaps put them into a smaller list?  The backgrounds listed in the last packet had examples like that (Artisan) which I feel makes it much easier on players and lends to that faster character creation Mearls was talking about in the penny arcade podcast. 



It definitely has a high likelyhood of intimidating new players. And the list will get longer.

I do both want to categorize it in smaller lists, definitely. I like the 10 and 12 item lists in the packet. I think 20 would be the longest one could make a category before it becomes "too much", then again, we can decide that once that's done.

I was also thinking of creating a roll d100 list. I just really like that idea. Even if I'm the only one that uses it, I'm creating a d100 list!
Do you have an opinion on what campaign settings should be printed in D&D Next? If so, please cast your votes in this poll! Poll: What campaign settings do you want to see printed in D&D Next?
The crafting is very popular in the MMO videogames (and pets, and "housing" or create your house, but it is other matter).

My idea is the "background levels". Do you rembember the nPCs classes from DM Guide 3rd Ed?

"Background levels" is like a template, or like class level but without hitpoints or bonus to attack and save. Only "class features" and bonus skill (and it may some harmless feat). The background levels can be "bought" sending XPs and it shouldn´t break balance of power. A 10th level dwarf  with 5 levels of blacksmith isn´t more powerful what other 10th level PC. A nPC  kobold with levels of miner wouldn´t more dangerous for combat. 

"Say me what you're showing off for, and I'll say you what you lack!" (Spanish saying)

 

Book 13 Anaclet 23 Confucius said: "The Superior Man is in harmony but does not follow the crowd. The inferior man follows the crowd, but is not in harmony"

 

"In a country well governed, poverty is something to be ashamed of. In a country badly governed, wealth is something to be ashamed of." - Confucius 

My idea is the "background levels".


When Mike Mearls said something about your background getting better as you level I was thinking something along these lines too.  If you look back at the first playtest I was hoping it would be something like this-

Level 1 Race, Class, Background, Specialty
Level 2 +1 Class, +1 Background
Level 3  +1 Specialty +1 Race
Level 4 +1 Class, +1 Background
Level 5  +1 Specialty +1 Race
...

So every level you'd be improving in the things that you chose to define yourself.
 
Thus the Artisan would improve his craft, selling techniques etc as he leveled, and cultural things unique to your race would improve too- perhaps dwarven characters gaining more abilities relating to knowing about stone, or increased toughness or minimum damage increase with dwarven favored weapons...

I was ok with it being a power increase if its something that's baked in- so everyone is getting some version of it. 
Please collect and update the DND Next Community Wiki Page with your ideas and suggestions!
Take a look at my clarified ability scores And also my Houserules relevent to DNDNext
I was ok with it being a power increase if its something that's baked in- so everyone is getting some version of it. 


I thought of this too that you should be able to take a 'sabattical' from adventuring and take a trade course say every 5th lvl  to add to your background even if it is something silly as muffin baking.  You might find someday it helps you in a diplomatic situation to bring the fresh muffins or something!   I like d20 and d100 tables so make every effort to trim the list to those and number them so I do not have to count lines.

But here is the problem with backgrounds and specialities being optional modules, those principled against the very concept of bonuses that it should be the raw naked d20 because that is they way she rolls, would have to either go hardcore and be less powerful or the bonuses are not baked in making the game easier if you take them, or just give makeup bonuses to those who are against having bonuses (like Dark Sun did for magic items)   

Personally I say bake them in because those who are against bonuses probably also want a hardcore playstyle, and want the game unbalanced against them rather than for them.  But look at 4e, people complained you had to take magic items to keep up, when they should have been raving about how hardcore the game got as you leveled without magic, instead they complained you had to take bonuses to compensate for their lack of magic.   Either you are being hardcore or you are not!  That is like complaining it was an easy mode game because you had three chances to die rather than a real mans save or die, but they dont actually change that rule to save or die (or even simpler just dead) because ...they might die if they did that.

Those of us like bonuses like the feeling of advancement it gives us, the concept that we are individualizing and specializing our character development, but we actually do want the game to keep up with us now that we are better because easy mode becomes no fun after the initial excitement.  So bake them in.

A compromise would be only half-bake them in, then it gets a little easier if you take them and a little harder if you don't.  But that would be designing for the middle, but they seem to be designing at extremes hoping the middle takes care of itself.  I suspect if you fully-bake them in the hardcore might at first complain but find they enjoy the game without their bonuses, and being baked in it is still a challenge to the bonused guy.

I have an old english monopoly game that replaces houses with street pedlars, I need to dig that out it has some very archaic jobs. 
How do you guys feel about blacksmith/armorsmith/weaponsmith? Should this all fall under blacksmith? Should you have to choose one of the three and only be able to do that one? Should you only have one of the three at full bonus and the other two at reduced bonus such as 2 less of a bonus? Is there some other method you would employ?
Do you have an opinion on what campaign settings should be printed in D&D Next? If so, please cast your votes in this poll! Poll: What campaign settings do you want to see printed in D&D Next?
How do you guys feel about blacksmith/armorsmith/weaponsmith? Should this all fall under blacksmith? Should you have to choose one of the three and only be able to do that one? Should you only have one of the three at full bonus and the other two at reduced bonus such as 2 less of a bonus? Is there some other method you would employ?



Well...for the sake of simple gameplay it probably wouldn't hurt, but a regular blacksmith makes things like tools, horseshoes, and the like. Weaponsmithing or armorer are very technical trades, and ones that require LOTS of training, apprenticeship, and practice. Perhaps (and this is just off the cuff thinking), a PC could start out as a regular blacksmith who could create nails, simple knives, horseshoes, and so on. Later on, if they choose to grow the skill, they could eventually become weaponsmiths and armorers. Maybe go from simple melee weapons and basic metal armor up to keen or masterwork weapons and armor.
Thanks! That's quite a list there. I'll incorporate them tomorrow, hopefully. I'm already seeing some stuff I like. Cheesemaker, beggar and fortune teller to name a few!



One of my characters (3.5) actually had 'Craft: Cheese' as a skill.    Yeah, yeah, cheesey.  But that character actually worked in a cheese shop.  My DM at the time liked the ol' school flavah of requiring training to level at the lower levels and our characters got some of the money from jobs.  Now the cheese shop was something I ended up using as a front/alibi when another player and I decided to get more money more faster, but it was still a lot of fun.  So I'm down with characters that have jobs.  It can really add something, IMO.

I was considering a more appropriate title, as they are jobs, trade skills, hobbies and whatever else. However, are we even able to change a thread title? I am unable to find a way if so.



You can change the thread title of any thread you've started yourself ... if nobody else has posted in it.  Once they have, that option is gone.  You can ask a mod to change the title if you'd like, though.  There's a thread in Community Business that may do the trick.  Check out the VCL Request thread.  I'd link but I'm lazy and you seem smart enough to get there on your own. 
Resident Prophet of the OTTer.

Section Six Soldier

Front Door of the House of Trolls

[b]If you're terribly afraid of your character dying, it may be best if you roleplayed something other than an adventurer.[/b]

Well...for the sake of simple gameplay it probably wouldn't hurt, but a regular blacksmith makes things like tools, horseshoes, and the like. Weaponsmithing or armorer are very technical trades, and ones that require LOTS of training, apprenticeship, and practice. Perhaps (and this is just off the cuff thinking), a PC could start out as a regular blacksmith who could create nails, simple knives, horseshoes, and so on. Later on, if they choose to grow the skill, they could eventually become weaponsmiths and armorers. Maybe go from simple melee weapons and basic metal armor up to keen or masterwork weapons and armor.



The reason this is cool is because if, as you level, you get "points" to put into your trade, you can expand your skill to include weapon or armorsmithing as you grow.

Taking diversionArchitect's idea, I could continue to put my profession points into blacksmithing to improve my quality and area of expertise (gaining more cash and higher bonuses on equipment) or I could only put a few there and then pick a new profession.  Brewer and Cheesemaker or a Blacksmith with Weapon Proficiency?

Yes, granted it may not have a HUGE game outcome, but as an optional rule, those of us who like to imagine our characters don't simply eat, sleep and sh*t killiing monsters, it adds a new aspect.







"The turning of the tide always begins with one soldier's decision to head back into the fray"

I think that trade skills leveling would be nice. Keep them separate from adventuring skills since they are less geared for such things on the whole.

Edition wars kill players,Dungeons and Dragons needs every player it can get.

I too like the idea of getting another background / skill / trade / proficiency / expertise / lore or whatever each time you level up.  It would be a recognition that you'd been pursuing this new area of interest in your spare time between adventures, and it had now added up to something that set you apart.  Maybe you could just have a big bucket of things you could pick up when you level up - you are class x going to level y, so you get z things from the bucket, and can choose whatever you like (though some of them might have prerequisites).  

So maybe on this occasion you get to pick two things, so you pick fletching and longbow proficiency for example.
I always liked the idea of having skills / backgrounds / trades baked into the class you choose to play, presented as "suggestions". For example:

A ranger might have bowyer/fletcher as a proficiency option for his class. He doesn't have to take it, but if he does he would get a small perk, like a +1 to rolls utilizing it.  Same for proficiencies such as recognizing animal sounds, direction sense, weather prediction, and so on. None of them would be mandatory (so as to not force people to play each class a specific way), but if you decided to go with them, you would get a minor benefit over someone from a different class.

 
You know, I always wanted to be a fireman in D&D. 
Firegenasi are more fun. But beyond backgrounds, I think there should be a seperate rule section for craft, and maybe profession or lore, but it is hard to judge until the core skill system is in place. The system should be developed so you can add as much detail as you want, but keep the bonuses to skills manageable.
Hey, Dude where's Harlotry? I wanted to make a livin' with the lovin'! Ya grand mastery in Harlotry.- Courtesan. Just kidding. Good list.
Hey, Dude where's Harlotry? I wanted to make a livin' with the lovin'! Ya grand mastery in Harlotry.- Courtesan. Just kidding. Good list.


A list of professions without the world's oldest profession?

Edition wars kill players,Dungeons and Dragons needs every player it can get.

Hey, Dude where's Harlotry? I wanted to make a livin' with the lovin'! Ya grand mastery in Harlotry.- Courtesan. Just kidding. Good list.


A list of professions without the world's oldest profession?



I think a charcter with high CHA should have this profession as default. 

I updated the OP and the second post with more info. The first I added what I got from the list Hocus-Smokus linked to. In post 2, I created a d100 list just because I can. Later I fully intend to categorize everything how Next has (artisan, commoner, and a lot more), but that's not a small project.


Hey, Dude where's Harlotry? I wanted to make a livin' with the lovin'! Ya grand mastery in Harlotry.- Courtesan. Just kidding. Good list.


A list of professions without the world's oldest profession?



I think a charcter with high CHA should have this profession as default. 




Very entertaining, and surprisingly valid, opinions on haroltry!

My 10 year old plays in my games, so it's out of the question for me for at least a few years. However, I might have that in there occasionally for humor purposes when it's just my adult friends playing.

TheOneWhoCallCrow, I think technically every adult character in D&D should have it by default! Lower charisma just means you get paid less. A lot less.
Do you have an opinion on what campaign settings should be printed in D&D Next? If so, please cast your votes in this poll! Poll: What campaign settings do you want to see printed in D&D Next?
Paladin by day, harlot by night. 

*Already thinking paladin/harlot jokes*

Not only a paladin's path is narrow, but also have corners. 

I need to play a mature campaign. 

As much I am impress by the number of jobs, but in the D&D world it's pretty narrow or already been cover.