I need a monster that can teleport (or fey step)

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I'm looking for a monter (preferably a beast or large cat type creature) that can teleport to a target, strike, and then teleport away (only 3 or 4 spaces)

I'm not against inventing one, but I always prefer to have some grounding in the rules... 

My idea is that my players will be in a completly dark room gettting hit from all directions, then when they swing to retaliate the creature is gone.

My back up plan is having a creature that flies up into the rafters... but I think it would fit better/be cooler to use teleportation or fay stepping.

I did a quick search and didn't come up with anything...
I'm looking for a monter (preferably a beast or large cat type creature) that can teleport to a target, strike, and then teleport away (only 3 or 4 spaces)

I'm not against inventing one, but I always prefer to have some grounding in the rules... 

My idea is that my players will be in a completly dark room gettting hit from all directions, then when they swing to retaliate the creature is gone.

My back up plan is having a creature that flies up into the rafters... but I think it would fit better/be cooler to use teleportation or fay stepping.

I did a quick search and didn't come up with anything...

Yeah, there probably isn't one. A "blink lynx" is not a unreasonable thing to imagine existing, though.

Heh: the "fey panther" has fey step, but it's encounter only. But you know what: someone just made that up too. The only difference between them and you is that they were able to stick it in a rulebook.

If I have to ask the GM for it, then I don't want it.

Fey panther is perfect! I'll just amend the move to be at-will free action. hehe

Thanks for all your help! I'm pretty new, what is the best way to find monsters like this?  Often I know what I want I just don't know how to find it.  (I'm subb'ed so I can use the Monster Builder)
Use the online Compendium and search for keyword "teleport" then filter it for other keywords like "beast" or the like if you're looking for something specific. Level doesn't hurt as a filter either but it's easy to uplevel or delevel things.

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Use the online Compendium and search for keyword "teleport" then filter it for other keywords like "beast" or the like if you're looking for something specific. Level doesn't hurt as a filter either but it's easy to uplevel or delevel things.

Yep, I just searched for "teleport" and filtered on "fey." Got lucky and "fey panther" jumped right out. As they're wont to do.

C'mon "blink lynx" is a better name.

Just be advised: the power is an encounter power for a reason. If it can blink around at-will, or even on a recharge, I recommend not making killing it the point of the encounter, because trying to do so might be extremely frustrating for the players.

If I have to ask the GM for it, then I don't want it.

Wraiths are better; just level those suckers up. They charge while stealthed/invisible, attack for lots of damage, and warp away + become invisible when hit.
Good point about encounter powers... I'll figure out a way to balance them out.  But I'm hoping my players just run for the exit, this is supposed to be a cage/feeding area of the beasts so I'm hoping they don't spend anytime in here once they figure out what is going on.

Surrealistik, I really like the wraith, I might just save him for another adventure.  This one calls for more of a beast/creature (something that could be an evil wizards pet(s)...) hence the Fey Panther.

I will only use the Compendium from now on, that monster builder is whack.

And yes, blink lynx is a much better name.
Good point about encounter powers... I'll figure out a way to balance them out.  But I'm hoping my players just run for the exit, this is supposed to be a cage/feeding area of the beasts so I'm hoping they don't spend anytime in here once they figure out what is going on.

Ok, cool. Be prepared for this to go a bit wrong. It's very common for players not to understand when the goal is for them to retreat.

And yes, blink lynx is a much better name.

Darn tootin'!

If I have to ask the GM for it, then I don't want it.

This might work better as a combined skill challenge/theater of the mind (in 4E? Really? Yes, really) encounter. If you put figs on a grid, players expect to kill things.

Here's an idea, but don't take it verbatim - you should adjust as appropriate for your group.
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Tell players they are trying to navigate through the dark room. Have them roll initiatives.

On their turn, they can make attacks vs. appropriate defenses for their level. Unless they have a way around the darkness, they take the normal penalties to hit things they can't see. Let them make melee attacks - the monsters are running around the PC's and nipping at them.

They can target monster A, B, or C as they choose. Bursts or blasts might get more than one monster. If they do sufficient damage (the bloodied value of an on-level skirmisher sounds good) that monster will be dead for its next attack, but will then get replaced. Improvise how status effects will hurt the monsters as you feel is fair and appropriate - but in general rule in favor of the players for encounters and dailys, and against them for at-wills.

As a move or a minor (Moderate DC move, Hard DC minor) they can make one of the below checks. They can also do these as a Standard DC if they wish.

Arcana - creates  a brief flash of light, which is then burnt out. One success and negates CA on the next monster attack.
Perception - Helps find the exit. One Success
Dungeoneering - Helps navigate in the dark. One Success.
Acrobatics - Helps dodge the monsters. One Success.
Intimidate - Keeps the monsters at bay. One Success.
Nature - Understand the monsters tactics. One Success.
Powers - give a success for appropriate use of powers/consumables/traits. Maybe a free success for someone having darkvision, or a success for someone drinking a potion that gives it. Remember not to allow teleportation unless they can see where they are going.

Don't count failures. Just make them get a set number of successes. You can limit PC's to one success per turn if you like - that incentivises them to do cool things other than play in the skill challenge. Once they get their X number of successes (maybe equal to the number of PC's+2), the party escapes.

On initiatives 30 (monster A), 20 (monster B) and 10 (monster C), a monster will attack a random PC (unless marked, then let the defender take the hit. If your defender has an aura, give them a bonus to their chance of being the target or just apply their penalty.) Take a swing at that player with CA and do on-level damage from a skirmisher monster's basic attack.
This might work better as a combined skill challenge/theater of the mind (in 4E? Really? Yes, really) encounter. If you put figs on a grid, players expect to kill things.

Agreed on both counts. "Theater of the mind" (*smacks head for typing that*) works fine in 4e, even as straight combat, but it requires trust and a willingness to let go of exact distances.

in general rule in favor of the players for encounters and dailys, and against them for at-wills.

I like that approach.

Arcana - creates  a brief flash of light, which is then burnt out. One success and negates CA on the next monster attack.
Perception - Helps find the exit. One Success
Dungeoneering - Helps navigate in the dark. One Success.
Acrobatics - Helps dodge the monsters. One Success.
Intimidate - Keeps the monsters at bay. One Success.
Nature - Understand the monsters tactics. One Success.
Powers - give a success for appropriate use of powers/consumables/traits. Maybe a free success for someone having darkvision, or a success for someone drinking a potion that gives it. Remember not to allow teleportation unless they can see where they are going.

Make this at least two skill challenges (one for trying to escape and one for dealing with the monsters) or think carefully about how you'd describe the scene if they got all their successes with Intimidate. Or just make Intimidate, Nature, and Acrobatics into support skills.

If you make it two challenges, have success or failure in one make the other easier. There's no reason why escaping needs to help on dealing with the monsters, since presumably they can be left behind, but if the group focuses on learning about and avoiding the monsters, the navigation challenge should be easier to accomplish.

Don't count failures. Just make them get a set number of successes. You can limit PC's to one success per turn if you like - that incentivises them to do cool things other than play in the skill challenge. Once they get their X number of successes (maybe equal to the number of PC's+2), the party escapes.

Always consider what failure means in a skill challenge. If it's going to take them forever to garner the successes they need, do they just die, or what?

If I have to ask the GM for it, then I don't want it.

In this case, failure means "I missed an opportunity to get us closer to getting out the door, which means we may suffer an additional monster attack."

If something bad happens every so often during this kind of skill challenge, you don't necessarily need to count a failure as anything other than a missed opportunity.

During a more traditional skill challenge, where PC's are simply making rolls, then I agree you need to either count failures towards an overall failure of the challenge, or penalize the PC's in some way for committing a failure.


As for Centauri's other suggestion - running this as two challenges, that's certainly a valid approach. There isn't really a right or wrong answer that fits everyone. Do what works best for your group.
During a more traditional skill challenge, where PC's are simply making rolls,

No such thing.

then I agree you need to either count failures towards an overall failure of the challenge

I'm talking about overall failure. In your example there's no deadline for failure, but success is also not guaranteed. So, what if they fail? Your example doesn't necessarily need to answer that, but anyone who runs an encounter should come up with an answer. Subjecting them to attacks implies that the alternative to success is death, which isn't adviseable. Maybe it's necessary to consider what the monsters are actually after, what goal, once achieved, will lead to them leaving the characters alone.

If I have to ask the GM for it, then I don't want it.

You should make a boggle ride the Panther...

Come to 4ENCLAVE for a fan based 4th Edition Community.

 

I don't know if they exist in 4rth ed but it sounds like you're describing a displacer beast to me.  

 
During a more traditional skill challenge, where PC's are simply making rolls,

No such thing.

then I agree you need to either count failures towards an overall failure of the challenge

I'm talking about overall failure. In your example there's no deadline for failure, but success is also not guaranteed. So, what if they fail? Your example doesn't necessarily need to answer that, but anyone who runs an encounter should come up with an answer. Subjecting them to attacks implies that the alternative to success is death, which isn't adviseable. Maybe it's necessary to consider what the monsters are actually after, what goal, once achieved, will lead to them leaving the characters alone.



I believe the monster's goal in this case is eating tasty, tasty hero, and then yes, the alternative to success is death. Just like any other combat encounter where the PC's are confronted with a monster whose goal is to eat the PC's. I could be wrong about this - the OP should know what the monsters goals are.

Death shouldn't be a very likely scenario. I don't know what level the PC's heroes are, but they should be able to survive being attacked 0-3 times a round against random PCs for a long time.

Really, the "penalty for failure" here is resource drain. They lose surges. They might expend dailies. Maybe they go into the next encounter without time for a short rest (be careful with this one - you want to make sure the next encounter is balanced with this in mind.) Good skill checks and smart use of powers will get the heroes out of this bind quickly, before the monsters have a chance to do a lot of damage.

As I read it, that was what the OP was looking for. A sort of dangerous situation the PC's should run through quickly, but where staying and fighting isn't really the ideal solution.
I believe the monster's goal in this case is eating tasty, tasty hero, and then yes, the alternative to success is death. Just like any other combat encounter where the PC's are confronted with a monster whose goal is to eat the PC's.

And that's a problem.

Death shouldn't be a very likely scenario. I don't know what level the PC's heroes are, but they should be able to survive being attacked 0-3 times a round against random PCs for a long time.

Perhaps, but perhaps not. If it can happen at all, and it's the only other thing that can happen, then it's a good idea to be ready for it to happen.

Really, the "penalty for failure" here is resource drain. They lose surges. They might expend dailies. Maybe they go into the next encounter without time for a short rest (be careful with this one - you want to make sure the next encounter is balanced with this in mind.)

Or to make sure that failure in the next encounter doesn't mean death.

Good skill checks and smart use of powers will get the heroes out of this bind quickly, before the monsters have a chance to do a lot of damage.

Good skill checks and smart use of powers can't be relied on happening.

As I read it, that was what the OP was looking for. A sort of dangerous situation the PC's should run through quickly, but where staying and fighting isn't really the ideal solution.

That's what I read too, but having seen and run situations in which the PCs should run, it's a fair bet that they won't think to do it right away, even if there's no grid put out. There are lots of ways to run this scenario, as you point out, but all of them should account for the players not getting it right, or getting it right and failing anyway. All encounters should.

If I have to ask the GM for it, then I don't want it.

I don't want to hem in the skill challenge too much, since this is for someone else's group and he knows them better than I do. But you make some good points. So...other ways whis encounter could be resolved...



  • There has to be a finite number of monsters. Eventually, the PC's could kill enough that there aren't any left to attack.

  • It's more likely that eventually, the PC's will have killed enough that the monsters will stop attacking.

  • The monsters may be sufficiently well fed that they aren't looking for a meal. In that case, they might stop attacking once the PC's are unconscious. Then you have to ask yourself if they have keepers who will check the cage, and what those keepers will do. Perhaps the PC's wake up imprisoned.

  • The PC's could always turn around and run out the way they came in, unless that's not an option.

  • Maybe spending too long in there might bring in unexpected reinforcements, from either side.

  • Players could surprise the DM and send things in an unexpected direction. Maybe one of them has a way of teleporting them out of the whole area (such as a Ring of Retreat) or of befriending the monsters or who knows what else they might think of. Now you're into improv territory...which can be really fun.




I'm not going to speculate on the next encounter at all, since the OP hasn't discussed that. Besides, it might be as simple as the PC's slamming the door behind them and taking a short rest.
Now you're into improv territory...which can be really fun.



I'd start and end there - no combat, no skill challenge (per se). Relative success results to determine the ebb and flow of the confrontation with clear goals for the PCs and the monster. Fictional blocks with open-ended solutions. No initiative or turns.

Moderate to High DC+, you do what you set out to do. Low to Moderate, you do what you set out to do but it costs you something. Under Low DC, you fail to do what you set out to do, it costs you something and/or the situation becomes more complicated.

(Caveat: This is a somewhat disassociative way of looking at skills and isn't exactly compatible with D&D's skills which are associative by nature. But it can work in practice as a way to play to find out what happens. I don't run encounters I already know the outcome to just to drain some resources or whatever.)

No amount of tips, tricks, or gimmicks will ever be better than simply talking directly to your fellow players to resolve your issues.
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Awesome advice guys! Sorry it has taken soo long to respond, I'm at work.

I don't want to go into TOO much detail because I share this account with one of my players and I would hate for him to go diggin' through here.

I can say that I will be using a little of everything people have said in one way or another.  I really appreciate the welcoming spirit and the wealth of information sharing. 


DON’T READ SPOILER IF YOU ARE PLAYING THIS ENCOUNTER TONIGHT!


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I think I am going to allow the encounter to be beatable (aka kill the monsters) but make it difficult.  Killing them will have both positive and negative effects later, so I want to leave it as an option (aka I’m not upping their level, or adding more  than ‘a couple’ )

Once/if they figure out the lights (vs accidentally stumbling to the exit) they will have the choice of flight or flee.  Although I’ve considered making the room impossible to light (except for say Darkvision PCs (which would require them to guide one another’s attacks and movements))

I’m really going to see how it goes.  They are solving a lot of puzzles before this, so this might be 1 puzzle too many.  I’m going to gauge as we can to see if they are looking for straight combat or pure trickery (even though we’ll probably end up somewhere in the middle)  we have been pretty good about improvising in our first 2 sessions.

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Thanks again guys!  I’ll let you know how it goes down! :D

Well my group is lame.  We only got through 2 encounters/puzzles, and did even get to the "Blink Lynx"  we'll have to see what happens next week!
Bats have Flyby Attacks and are perfect for your setting.

Wyverns have Flyby Attacks as well, but they might run into the wall since it's dark.
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