Errors in Packet

This thread is to list errors found in the packet and help DM's be aware of them.

#1

Damage Rolls



Each weapon and spell indicates the damage it



deals, such as 1d8 or 2d8. Roll the dice, add any



modifiers (including the ability modifier you used



to make the attack), and apply the damage to your



target. Magic weapons, special abilities, and so



forth can grant a bonus to your damage.



Now see Pre-gen character fighter archer he has Longbow damage of 1d8 ONLY



#2 Augury Spell

Each time you cast this spell



in the same day after the first, there is a 20 percent



chance (1–5 on a d20 roll) that you will get a false



reading. The DM makes this roll in secret.



20% is 1-4 on a d20 roll
Here's a good one: Look at Dragon Breath for the Sorceror. There is no information on when you get it, and it doesn't even mention whether or not it takes an action.
The warlock's Fabrication of the weave lasts 10
Interpretation question based on the problem the OP noticed.

Does this mean that any spell which starts "Make a magical attack against one creature" would add the magic attack stat to damage? Would a cleric's radiant lance deal 1D8+4+Modifier? Does Ray of Frost deal 1D6+3+Modifier?

Because... that adds quite a bit of lethality to all spells and the Warlock's Eldritch Blast... it also makes fighter's CS and Rogue's SA seem less impressive at level 1.
"What's stupid is when people decide that X is true - even when it is demonstrable untrue or 100% against what we've said - and run around complaining about that. That's just a breakdown of basic human reasoning." -Mike Mearls
How about Dragon Sorcerers get proficiency in martial melee weapons but in suggested equipment they get a greatsword. "Um... You look nasty with your big meat cleaver but good luck swinging it!" (A greatsword is a HEAVY melee weapon)...
Oh yeah... skill training at level 2 could use a better explanation/example. I've heard two understandable explanations of how that's handled.
"What's stupid is when people decide that X is true - even when it is demonstrable untrue or 100% against what we've said - and run around complaining about that. That's just a breakdown of basic human reasoning." -Mike Mearls
Tilden, i thought heavy weapons were just martial weapons that small characters couldnt use

YKTOG, how is it confusing? the bonus from one of you trained skills gets an increase of 1, the total bonus cannot exceed +7
I think the confusing part is that it reads like you can get training in a new skill, but it's unclear if that new skill only gains a +1 or starts at +3 like other training. I interpret it as a +1 for a new skill, or a +1 to an existing skill.
The confusion I've seen is about the training new skills. I've seen people on here say they'll use this... the bg trained skills start at 3, but any newly trained skills increase from 0 (instead of starting from 3). I don't agree with this interpretation, but can see where it would come from. Also, I like that interpretation (esp. If jack of all gives +3 training).
"What's stupid is when people decide that X is true - even when it is demonstrable untrue or 100% against what we've said - and run around complaining about that. That's just a breakdown of basic human reasoning." -Mike Mearls
...wow internet timing. Wow.
"What's stupid is when people decide that X is true - even when it is demonstrable untrue or 100% against what we've said - and run around complaining about that. That's just a breakdown of basic human reasoning." -Mike Mearls
AlmightyK... Where does it say that about heavy weapons? Not disagreeing... Just cannot find it...
nevermind, i was mistaken. although i am right about the small not being able to use them thing
In regards to skills, in the Backgrounds file, it says "Your modifier when making checks using that skill equals 3 + the ability modifier associated with the skill."

That suggests to me that new skills start at the +3 (like the pre-packaged Background ones), and can improve from there using those rules. 

For those confused on how DDN's modular rules might work, this may provide some insight: http://www.tor.com/blogs/2012/11/the-world-of-darkness-shines-when-it-abandons-canon

@mikemearls: Uhhh... do you really not see all the 3e/4e that's basically the entire core system?

 

It is entirely unnecessary to denigrate someone else's approach to gaming in order to validate your own.

Strider, that's how I read it as well.
But, I much prefer the new skills starting from +1.
"What's stupid is when people decide that X is true - even when it is demonstrable untrue or 100% against what we've said - and run around complaining about that. That's just a breakdown of basic human reasoning." -Mike Mearls
i dont know where you are all getting this "new skills" idea from...
the only way to train new skills so far is to take a feat, and states the bonus you gain for it
So I am set to wonder which they intended for a dragon sorcerer... I can clearly see the greatsword/dragon blood/full armor kinda thing... but that is a whole additional proficiency "level" not provided in the class right up... huh... Maybe a designer would be so happy as to clarify this? To much to hope I would suppose...
Strider, that's how I read it as well. But, I much prefer the new skills starting from +1.



Just out of curiosity - why? All of the other skills start at +3, so why shouldn't any new skills?

For those confused on how DDN's modular rules might work, this may provide some insight: http://www.tor.com/blogs/2012/11/the-world-of-darkness-shines-when-it-abandons-canon

@mikemearls: Uhhh... do you really not see all the 3e/4e that's basically the entire core system?

 

It is entirely unnecessary to denigrate someone else's approach to gaming in order to validate your own.

    Now a more serious error for those working on a campaign is that the XP chart is way out of whack with the XP you get from encounters.  [As written, you may find it physically impossible to get much beyond 10th level.]   A possible correction is to be found under Experience?, in this thread.
Warlocks have one less spell on their ritual spell list than they are allowed to get. As-written, you have no spell you can choose at level 3 to add to your ritual book, yet have a spell choice to use; there are only two 1st level rituals listed, Alarm and Comprehend Languages.
The pre-gen dwarf fighter attacks list the battleaxe as doing bludgeoning dmg and the warhammer as doing slashing dmg.
The biggest error I've come across so far in the new packet is the accidental inclusion of the Sorcerer and Warlock classes. This is obviously an oversight that needs to be addressed ASAP.


[/troll] ;)
D&D Next - Basic and Expert Editions

I firmly believe that there should be two editions of the game; the core rules released as a "Basic" set and a more complicated expanded rules edition released as an "Expert" set. These two editions would provide separate entry points to the game; one for new players or players that want a more classic D&D game and another entry point for experienced gamers that want more options and all the other things they have come to expect from previous editions.

Also, they must release several rules modules covering the main elements of the game (i.e., classes, races, combat, magic, monsters, etc.) upon launch to further expand the game for those that still need more complexity in a particular element of the game.


Here's a mockup of the Basic Set I created.



(CLICK HERE TO VIEW LARGER IMAGE)
  

Basic Set

This boxed set contains a simple, "bare bones" edition of the game; the core rules. It's for those that want a rules-light edition of the game that is extremely modifiable or for new players that get intimidated easily by too many rules and/or options. The Basic Set contains everything needed to play with all the "classic" D&D races (i.e., Human, Dwarf, Elf, and Halfling) and classes (i.e., Cleric, Fighter, Rogue, Wizard) all the way up to maximum level (i.e., 20th Level).

The Basic boxed set contains:

Quick Start Rules
A "choose your own way" adventure intended as an intro to RPGs and basic D&D terms.

Player's Handbook
(Softcover, 125 pages)
Features rules for playing the classic D&D races and classes all the way up to 20th level.

Dungeon Master's Guide

(Softcover, 125 pages)
Includes the basic rules for dungeon masters.

Monster Manual
(Softcover, 100 pages)
Includes all the classic iconic monsters from D&D. 

Introductory Adventure
(Keep on the Borderlands)
An introductory adventure for beginning players and DMs.

Also includes: 

Character Sheets
Reference Sheets
Set of Dice


Expert Set

A set of hardbound rules that contains the core rules plus expanded races and classes, more spells and a large selection of optional rules modules — that is, pretty much everything that experienced players have come to expect. Each expert edition manual may be purchased separately, or in a boxed set. The Expert set includes:

Expert PHB (Hardcover, 225 pages. $35 Includes core rules plus 10 playable races, 10 character classes, expanded selection of spells and rules modules for players.)
Expert DMG (Hardcover, 250 pages. $35 Includes core rules plus expanded rules modules for DMs.)
Expert MM (Hardcover, 225 pages. $35 Includes an expanded list of monsters and creatures to challenge characters)


Expansions

These expansion rules modules can be used with both the Basic and Expert sets. Each expansion covers one specific aspect of the game, such as character creation, combat, spells, monsters, etc.) 

Hall of Heroes (Hardcover, 225 pages. $35 Includes a vast selection of playable character races and classes, new and old all in one book)
Combat and Tactics (Hardcover, 225 pages. $35 Includes dozens of new and old optional rules for combat all in one book)
Creature Compendium (Hardcover, 350 pages.$35 Includes hundreds of monsters, new and old all in one book)
The Grimoire (Hardcover, 225 pages. $35 Includes hundreds of new and old spells all in one book)





A Million Hit Points of Light: Shedding Light on Damage

A Million Hit Points of Light: Shedding Light on Damage and Hit Points

In my personal campaigns, I use the following system for damage and dying. It's a slight modification of the long-standing principles etsablished by the D&D game, only with a new definition of what 0 or less hit points means. I've been using it for years because it works really well. However, I've made some adjustments to take advantage of the D&D Next rules. I've decided to present the first part in a Q&A format for better clarity. So let's begin...

What are hit points?
The premise is very simple, but often misunderstood; hit points are an abstraction that represent the character's ability to avoid serious damage, not necessarily their ability to take serious damage. This is a very important distinction. They represent a combination of skillful maneuvering, toughness, stamina and luck. Some targets have more hit points because they are physically tougher and are harder to injure...others have more because they are experienced combatants and have learned how to turn near fatal blows into mere scratches by skillful maneuvering...and then others are just plain lucky. Once a character runs out of hit points they become vulnerable to serious life-threatening injuries.

So what exactly does it mean to "hit" with a successful attack roll, then?
It means that through your own skill and ability you may have wounded your target if the target lacks the hit points to avoid the full brunt of the attack. That's an important thing to keep in mind; a successful "hit" does not necessarily mean you physically damaged your target. It just means that your attack was well placed and forced the target to exert themselves in such a way as to leave them vulnerable to further attacks. For example, instead of severing the target's arm, the attack merely grazes them leaving a minor cut.

But the attack did 25 points of damage! Why did it only "graze" the target?
Because the target has more than 25 hit points. Your attack forced them to exert a lot of energy to avoid the attack, but because of their combat skill, toughness, stamina and luck, they managed to avoid being seriously injured. However, because of this attack, they may not have the reserves to avoid your next attack. Perhaps you knocked them off balance or the attack left them so fatigued they lack the stamina to evade another attack. It's the DM's call on how they want to narrate the exact reason the blow didn't kill or wound the target.

Yeah, but what about "touch" attacks that rely on physical contact?
Making physical contact with a target is a lot different than striking them, so these types of attacks are the exception. If a touch attack succeeds, the attacker manages to make contact with their target.

If hit points and weapon damage don't always represent actual damage to the target, then what does it represent?
Think of the damage from an attack as more like a "threat level" rather than actual physical damage that transfers directly to the target's body. That is, the more damage an attack does, the harder it is to avoid serious injury. For example, an attack that causes 14 points of damage is more likely to wound the target than 3 points of damage (depending on how many hit points the target has left). The higher the damage, the greater the chance is that the target will become seriously injured. So, an attack that does 34 points of damage could be thought of as a "threat level of 34." If the target doesn't have the hit points to negate that threat, they become seriously injured.

Ok, but shouldn't armor reduce the amount of damage delivered from an attack?
It does reduce damage; by making it harder for an attack to cause serious injury. A successful hit against an armored target suggests that the attack may have circumvented the target's armor by striking in a vulnerable area.

What about poison and other types of non-combat damage?
Hit point loss from non-physical forms of damage represents the character spitting the poison out just in time before it takes full strength or perhaps the poison just wasn't strong enough to affect them drastically, but still weakens them. Again, it's the DMs call on how to narrate the reasons why the character avoids serious harm from the damage.

If hit points don't don't represent actual damage then how does that make sense with spells like Cure Serious Wounds and other forms of healing like healer kits with bandages?
Hit points do represent some physical damage, just not serious physical damage. Healing magic and other forms of healing still affect these minor wounds just as well as more serious wounds. For example, bandaging up minor cuts and abrasions helps the character rejuvenate and relieve the pain and/or fatigue of hit point loss. The key thing to remember is that it's an abstraction that allows the DM freedom to interpret and narrate it as they see fit.

What if my attack reduces the target to 0 or less hit points?
If a player is reduced to 0 or less hit points they are wounded. If a monster or NPC is reduce to 0 or less hit points they are killed.

Why are monsters killed immediately and not players?
Because unless the monsters are crucial to the story, it makes combat resolution much faster. It is assumed that players immediately execute a coup de grace on wounded monsters as a finishing move.

What if a character is wounded by poison or other types of non-physical damage?
If a character becomes wounded from non-combat damage they still receive the effects of being wounded, regardless if they show any physical signs of injury (i.e., internal injuries are still considered injuries).

Ok. I get it...but what happens once a character is wounded?
See below.
 

Damage and Dying

Once a character is reduced to 0 or less hit points, they start taking real damage. In other words, their reserves have run out and they can no longer avoid taking serious damage.

  1. Characters are fully operational as long as they have 1 hit point or more. They may have minor cuts, bruises, and superficial wounds, but they are are not impaired significantly. 
  2. Once they reach 0 or less hit points, they become Wounded (see below).That is, they have sustained a wound that impairs their ability to perform actions.
  3. If they reach a negative amount of hit points equal or greater than their Constitution score, they are Incapacitated. This means they are in critical condition and could possibly die.
  4. Characters will die if their hit points reach a negative amount greater than their Constitution score, plus their current level.

Unharmed: 1 hp or more
Wounded: 0 hp or less
Incapacitated: -(Constitution) to -(Constitution+Level)
Dead: Less than -(Constitution +Level)

Wounded
When the character reaches 0 or less hit points they become wounded. Wounded characters receive disadvantage on all attacks and saving throws until they heal back up to 1 hit point or more. This allows for a transitory stage between healthy and dying, without having to mess around with impairment rules while the character still has hit points left.

Incapacitated
Characters begin dying when they reach a negative amount of hit points equal to their Constitution score. At which point, they must make a DC 10 Constitution saving throw on each of their following turns (the disadvantage from being wounded does not apply for these saving throws).

If successful, the character remains dying, but their condition does not worsen.

If the saving throw fails, another DC 10 Constitution saving throw must be made. If that one fails, the character succumbs to their wounds and dies. If successful, the character stabilizes and is no longer dying.

Finally, if a dying character receives first aid or healing at any point, they immediately stabilize.

Dead
Characters will die if they reach a negative amount of hit points equal to their Constitution, plus their current level. Thus, if an 8th level character with a Constitution score of 12 is down to 4 hit points then takes 24 points of damage (reducing their hit points to -20) the attack kills them outright.

I would agree that new skills should start at +1.  The reason being that the skills you have from your background you have honed over years of practice.  Thus their +3 modifier.  Starting a newly gained skill at +1 makes a certain amount of sense when you think about it that way.  Another way to think about it is that if you could use your skill training to pick up a new skill at +3, would you trade that to give a previously trained skill a +1?  If everything is +1, everything is equal, and it highlights how much effort went into your character getting those starting skills to where they are at when you start the game.  Personally, I prefer it this way.
That warm fuzzy feeling you get when you a forum thread you're subscribed to has a new comment.
This response bugs me. Characters aren't actually suddenly gaining new abilities. It is new skills they have been developing over time. Thus EXPERIENCE
Strider, Cobalt wrote it up. I agree. AlmightyK, check the Backgrounds pdf and look under improving skills. It's pretty early in the packet.
"What's stupid is when people decide that X is true - even when it is demonstrable untrue or 100% against what we've said - and run around complaining about that. That's just a breakdown of basic human reasoning." -Mike Mearls
The Dragon Sorcerer's Suggested Equipment list the Greatsword, but it is not proficient with Heavy Weapons, only Basic, Simple Missile and Martial weaon.

Yan
Montréal, Canada
@Plaguescarred on twitter

The Dragon Sorcerer's Suggested Equipment list the Greatsword, but it is not proficient with Heavy Weapons, only Basic, Simple Missile and Martial weaon.

Dragon sorcerer is proficient in ALL weapons and armor via the Dragon herritage.
The Dragon Sorcerer's Suggested Equipment list the Greatsword, but it is not proficient with Heavy Weapons, only Basic, Simple Missile and Martial weaon.

Dragon sorcerer is proficient in ALL weapons and armor via the Dragon herritage.


Not in my Packet. Wink

Mine says:

Class pg. 13 Weapon Proficiencies: You gain proficiency with martial melee weapons. Also, the bonus to your weapon attack rolls increases by 1.

Yan
Montréal, Canada
@Plaguescarred on twitter

The Dragon Sorcerer's Suggested Equipment list the Greatsword, but it is not proficient with Heavy Weapons, only Basic, Simple Missile and Martial weaon.

Dragon sorcerer is proficient in ALL weapons and armor via the Dragon herritage.


Not in my Packet. 

Mine says:

Class pg. 13 Weapon Proficiencies: You gain proficiency with martial melee weapons. Also, the bonus to your weapon attack rolls increases by 1.

Heh, look at that. My bad.  When it said "Armor and Shields", I read "Armor and Weapons".  
No prob Daganev !





Tongue Out


Yan
Montréal, Canada
@Plaguescarred on twitter