Ideas for a "stolen story"

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I have a PC who in my game who likes to greatly exaggerate his doings.  For instance, after rescuing some people on a hijacked Lightning Rail, he told people in a bar that he had defeated half the Karrnathi army (when it was a group of Emerald Claws), stopped some vile magics (the Rail controls were broken, they had to fix them) and then thanked personally by the king (nothing even close happened, he got arrested after assaulting the authorities that came to help).

This is all great story, totally awesome as a character quirk.  I would like to build on it and have a misunderstanding occur.  I would like another adventurer to come to this character totally angry because he told a story remarkably similar to something that happened but the other adventurer did.  So the adventurer thinks this character is trying to steal credit for it.

My problem is that I need something really outlandish, but still possible to have occurred and I can't think of anything really good.  Ideas?

The game is in Eberron if you couldn't guess already.
My problem is that I need something really outlandish, but still possible to have occurred and I can't think of anything really good.  Ideas?

Bring the player in on this. Have him come up with some outlandish story, and then fit the actual events to it. It's a fantasy setting: anything goes, especially anything a braggart is going to try to pass off as plausible. If you have trouble, bring it here and we'll try to help.

[N]o difference is less easily overcome than the difference of opinion about semi-abstract questions. - L. Tolstoy

Maybe he finds himself walking into a bar that caters to adventurers.  Maybe some adventurers start talking, and one talks about the time he captured a couple of notorious theives.  Maybe the other bar patrons are impressed by this rather mundane feat, and start buying the guy drinks.

If he doesn't take the bait, maybe a couple other patrons can start telling stories too.  And once he does take the bait, boy is it on.  Every time he tells a story, another adventurer replies, "That's nothing, this one time..."  Escalate things with more and more outlandish stories until he comes up with something so bizarre that you can't think of any way to top it.  Then have him become the hero of the bar, free drinks for the rest of the night, etc.

Of course, this gets him quite the reputation.  By the next morning, people are start talking about his amazing story all over town.  And the most outlandish one sounds all too familiar to your newest NPC...
Bring the player in on this. Have him come up with some outlandish story, and then fit the actual events to it. It's a fantasy setting: anything goes, especially anything a braggart is going to try to pass off as plausible. If you have trouble, bring it here and we'll try to help.



It's going to be hard to bring him in on this without just telling him what I'm doing.  He never makes up new stories, just elaborates on what they did already.  His character however, makes up stories all the time, the player just doesn't tell them.  The player is more creative when he has something to work with already.  And I don't like to tell people my ideas ahead of time, that's why I come to the boards, so it's always a surprise at the table.

And I did bring it here :P

Stuff Mooby said...



I would love to use your idea, problem is, like I said above, the player isn't really creative enough without something to work with to come up with an outlandish story from nowhere, let alone a whole group of them.  And with a group of NPCs trying to top each other, I'd have to create a whole slew of them, and I'm having trouble coming up with one, lol.

So really what I'm asking for here are specific ideas of stories that I can use, not a general set-up of how to use them, sorry if I was misleading.

Thanks!
I can't help but recall a Mickey Mouse cartoon.
A giant comes to town and the whole town is talking about it, except for Mickey.
He is plagued by flies. He kills 5 in one blow and tells a neighbor. The neighbor thinks he killed 5 giants and passes it on. Soon Mickey has to tell the story to the king. He does it with great flair, never mentioning that they were flies.  He is then sent off to kill the giant with Donald and Goofy.

So what can we learn from this?

He is already bragging about taking on half an army and vile magics. Let him exaggerate it a bit then tell it to the king/magistrate/bigwig. Congratulations, he now has to take on vile magics and a quarter of an army!
I started playing D&D in the 80's. I've played D&D, 1e, 2e, and 3.xe (and many other RPGs). I also played Magic since it came out (except for a few years around the change of the millennium. I say this so you know a bit of my experience, not because I care about editions.
It's going to be hard to bring him in on this without just telling him what I'm doing.

Yes, that's right. That's what I'm saying.

The player is more creative when he has something to work with already.

So, you're looking for ideas for him to springboard off of.

And I don't like to tell people my ideas ahead of time, that's why I come to the boards, so it's always a surprise at the table.

I can understand this point of view, and partially hold to it myself, but when it comes to things that are directly related to the character concept and has the potential of greatly complicating that character, it's highly advisable to bring the player in on the idea. It can still be a surprise for the other players.

And I did bring it here :P

I meant, bring in the ideas that you and your player come up with, so we can help make any outlandish brainstorm into something cool and plausible. But I bet with the two of you working on this you'll be able to straighten out most wrinkles on your own.

[N]o difference is less easily overcome than the difference of opinion about semi-abstract questions. - L. Tolstoy