Encouraging Player Participation, Idea Contribution Wise

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I have a PC who is a great roleplayer, but is also usually the only one making decisions for the party. In combat and in dungeon crawls this isn't really a problem as the goals or next hurdle are rather linear. However, in the last session the party spent some time roaming free in the local town, and this player got a little peeved at how the other players did not submit ideas for 'where to go next' or 'what the plan is'. Then the player just stopped providing ideas for what to do next and let the other players flounder until I moved the story along on my own. I'm sure this varies group to group, but how do you encourage all your players to provide ideas to the party? Drown your players in adventure hooks so there are always plenty of options?
Currently DMing a 3.5e AoW game one night a week. Players are almost through Three Faces of Evil. If you are considering beginning this campaign using this edition, I can help.
I have a PC who is a great roleplayer, but is also usually the only one making decisions for the party. In combat and in dungeon crawls this isn't really a problem as the goals or next hurdle are rather linear. However, in the last session the party spent some time roaming free in the local town, and this player got a little peeved at how the other players did not submit ideas for 'where to go next' or 'what the plan is'. Then the player just stopped providing ideas for what to do next and let the other players flounder until I moved the story along on my own. I'm sure this varies group to group, but how do you encourage all your players to provide ideas to the party? Drown your players in adventure hooks so there are always plenty of options?

Ask questions about the area, the plot, the PCs, the history, whatever isn't clear or is player decidable (hint: almost everything is).

You're in a town:
DM: Suddenly, the town crier starts up, ringing his bell and making an announcement. Bob, what event is he announcing?
Bob (the creative one): A wedding.
DM: Great. Who's getting married? Alan?
Alan: Uh... I don't know.
DM: What would make it something your character would pay attention to?
Alan: Uh... the name of the groom sounds weird.
DM: How so? Is it familiar? Evil-sounding?
Alan: Evil-sounding. Like it's a demon or something.

For instance. Don't just ask them what they do next, ask them what's going on, what it looks like, what it sounds like, why any of them would bother being interested in it, and if they're not interested in that what was it that has suddenly grabbed their attention?

If I have to ask the GM for it, then I don't want it.

What Centauri said.

Also, try more closed location-based adventures as opposed to plot-based. Everyone knows what to do in the sunken temple in the swamp. In town? Not so much.

You may have a bunch of players with failure mitigation syndrome as well and because they're afraid to be "wrong," they don't make any suggestions. Remind them that there is no wrong because you'll always work to make the results of their choices interesting (good, bad, or ugly, still interesting).

No amount of tips, tricks, or gimmicks will ever be better than simply talking directly to your fellow players to resolve your issues.
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