Dungeon Command Rules Questions/Clarifications

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I think because the game would drag on too long. If Morale is a finite resource, that encourages you to go after those early-game treasures.
 I think it should be limited, but currently there's no incentive to Cower; and playing large creatures is more detrimental to the playing field because they're such big targets they get taken down as soon as they get in range.
 I don't think it should be anything huge, but a little extra wouldn't hurt.  
I have a couple questions I hope somebody can help me with.

When do targets need to be declared for attack actions? Is the answer the same for both basic attacks (those printed in the upper left of a creature's card) and for attacks granted through Order cards?

For example, take Shadowy Ambush. It reads "Shift 2 squares; then, Make a melee attack that deals 50 damage." Imagine that my Drow House Guard is 2 squares away from a badly wounded War Wizard and a Human Ranger that are adjacent to each other. My Drow has already moved for the turn, but I want to use Shadowy Ambush to shift next to both enemies, and then finish the wizard off.

If I have to declare a target for the attack when I cast Shadowy Ambush (that is, when the ability goes on the stack), then I would need to name the War Wizard as the intended target. If, after my shift, my opponent decides to interrupt by shifting his War Wizard away, then my attack would fizzle, despite the fact that my Drow is now also adjacent to a Human Ranger I could have attacked instead.

Or; does targetting happen upon the resolution of an attack? In this case, I can shift my Drow up without announcing a target. My opponent would probalby still try to save his wizard from the predictable attack, but at least I'd get to waste a ranger instead. 

It seems that Shadowy Ambush becomes a much worse card if the former is the case, and much more...flavorful if it's the latter. It seems a lot more in the spirit of the card to *not* telegraph your ambush to your opponent. We had been playing that targets were chosen as the attack was put on the stack, as that was most intuitive for basic attacks and a lot of order card attacks. However, the Shadowy Ambush situation stumped us. It didn't seem right to have to say "You! Over there! I'm going to ambush you soon! Now's your chance to avoid my attack!"

Regardless, we ended up deciding to play the way we had been all along, and the Drow lost his attack and promptly died the next turn.

* * * * *

Additionally, when does tapping occur? Do creatures tap as part of the cost to put an attack or Standard/Immediate ability on the stack? (If so, that makes Sieze the Opportunity quite good). We've been playing that tapping occurs as part of the cost, but we couldn't find any clarification in the rulebook.

Thanks for any (and all) clarification on the above two points! 
The second question I'm pretty sure is exactly what is intended (your opponent attacks, which taps his creature, you then seize the opportunity on that tapped creature). I'm not sure what happens if the 20 damage kills the attacking creature. i.e. does that prevent the attack? do the resolve at the same time? 

As to the first question, which card/ability allows the wizard to do that? 
The second question I'm pretty sure is exactly what is intended (your opponent attacks, which taps his creature, you then seize the opportunity on that tapped creature). I'm not sure what happens if the 20 damage kills the attacking creature. i.e. does that prevent the attack? do the resolve at the same time? 

As to the first question, which card/ability allows the wizard to do that? 

Ah, I didn't exactly have a specific ability in mind. It's more the larger issue that I was interested in. Let's say instead that he had an ally next to him that could use the Level 1 STR order which protects against 30 damage to an ally. That would have the same effect of potentially neutralizing the Shadowy Ambush for purposes of the example. 

As for the second question, if an attack's source is destroyed before the attack can resolve, the attack fizzles. That's an official answer, but I don't have the time to find the source right now. Sorry! 

I've got some friends over and we're playing DC right now.  
In that case, then yes, that is how the card is designed to work. You play your attack, he taps to use an interrupt. At that point he is not able to play any additional interrupts using that creature (without something special that would allow him to untap it).

I would assume that if there were some interrupt that allowed the creature to shift, that it would behave the same. The target that he declared is no longer valid, so the attack would fizzle.  
In that case, then yes, that is how the card is designed to work. You play your attack, he taps to use an interrupt. At that point he is not able to play any additional interrupts using that creature (without something special that would allow him to untap it).

I would assume that if there were some interrupt that allowed the creature to shift, that it would behave the same. The target that he declared is no longer valid, so the attack would fizzle.  




If through a card such as "Riposte" or "Seize the Opportunity" you manage to destroy the original attacking creature, that creature would be dead and it's attack would not occur.


The following is from a question to Chris Dupuis, game designer:

Question --
"(2) Lethal Damage with Immediates.
Situation: An opponent makes a melee attack and I respond with an Immediate that also does damage (Seize the Opportunity, Riposte, etc.). If the damage from my Immediate is lethal, would the original attack against me not go through because my opponents creature is DEAD and not able to complete the attack? When does the damage from my opponent "hit" me? I'm familiar with the Stack from my days of playing magic, but one of the Wizards GMs at GenCon told me a different story."


Answer --
2. If your immediate would do lethal damage before his attack cleared the stack, his attack would fizzle as he is no longer an eligible attacker. He could always cower your damage to let his attack go off.

Thanks to everyone who has responded, but I still feel like my first question hasn't been addressed. I may have been unclear.

In short, the question is: when do you assign the target of an attack action? Do you select a target as the attack/order goes onto the stack? Or, do you select the target when the attack/order goes to resolve?

My original example with Shadowy Ambush wasn't a question about the card, but just an illustration as to why such a question matters.

I know that assigning as the action goes on the stack seems more intuitive (at least to me), but I am hoping to find an official answer / offical source for this. Thanks! 
Hmmm... I'd like some more official clarity on this actually.


There is a specific rule about stacks containing multiple actions on cards.

MULTIPLE ACTIONS ON CARDS: Some Order cards contain several distinct actions, which must be performed in order. When you play a card with multiple actions on it, they go on the stack in the reverse order they appear on the card. Players can respond to each action separately.


For example, the Shadowy Ambush card contains two actions: Shift 2 squares; then, Make a melee attack that deals 50 damage. When you play this card on a creature, the attack goes on the stack first, and the shift goes on top. When the card’s actions resolve, the creature will take them in the correct order.



Riposte reads:
Prevent 20 damage to this creature from 1 source.

Make a melee attack that deals 10 damage.


The original attack goes on the stack.
Then Riposte is added to the stack.

Riposte is resolved first, but according to the Multiple Actions on Cards rule, the Prevent 20 Damage takes place first.

The part about players dealing with each action seperately got me wondering, does this mean the original damage is intended to be applied to the prevention portion and resolved, then the riposte deals damage?


I agree a clarification would be nice, but given things usually follow Magic pretty closely in this game, my guess is that the prevention effect creates a shield, so that when the card resolves, it creates an effect that will prevent damage when the source actuall deals it.  (In other words, the Riposte prevention resolves at the top of the stack, but doesn't do anything until the bottom.)  As you say though, clarification would be nice.

Clarification would also be nice as to what "source" actually means in terms of a damage source.  I sort of assume "source" is shorthand for "a thing sitting on the stack" because that interacts with Feint in the way everyone I've played with expects (ie, you tap your dude and can't play a defensive immediate yet because there's nothing to target).  It could be the intent is that the source is the creature making the attack, though, in which case it seems like you could respond to Feint with a prevention card and have it work if that creature then attacked you later (presumably in the turn, though that's also not clear if this is how source works).

Basically I can see why no one wanted to write a comprehensive rules for Dungeon Command, but sadly it probably needs it. 
 If I have to declare a target for the attack when I cast Shadowy Ambush (that is, when the ability goes on the stack), then I would need to name the War Wizard as the intended target. If, after my shift, my opponent decides to interrupt by shifting his War Wizard away, then my attack would fizzle, despite the fact that my Drow is now also adjacent to a Human Ranger I could have attacked instead.

Or; does targetting happen upon the resolution of an attack? In this case, I can shift my Drow up without announcing a target. My opponent would probalby still try to save his wizard from the predictable attack, but at least I'd get to waste a ranger instead. 



He absolutely would know the target of the attack and have a pirority stop where he could play an intterupt with that knowledge.

Play Shadowy ambush (declaring your target and taping your creature), putting the attack on the stack then the shift.
Opponent's priority
Resolve the Shift (assuming it's still legal)
Opponent's priority 
Resolve the Attack (assuming it's still legal)

Clarification would also be nice as to what "source" actually means in terms of a damage source.  I sort of assume "source" is shorthand for "a thing sitting on the stack" because that interacts with Feint in the way everyone I've played with expects (ie, you tap your dude and can't play a defensive immediate yet because there's nothing to target).  It could be the intent is that the source is the creature making the attack, though, in which case it seems like you could respond to Feint with a prevention card and have it work if that creature then attacked you later (presumably in the turn, though that's also not clear if this is how source works).



The judges at the PAX tourament said that a "source" is an action.  It was exactly the feint, uncanny dodge, sneak attack senario.  They ruled that no he could not name the creature as a source and prevent an undeclared attack.  It seemed like it wasn't the first time they had encountered that question.

Also the example on page 9 of the rules (under "THE STACK") says "uncanny dodge goes onto the stack above Killing Strike and resolves first: ... chooses to prevent the damage from Killing Strike."  If the intent was creatures are sources I think it would have said Dragon Knight instead.

I expect that in addition to errata the rules will get an updated version sooner or later.

The judges at the PAX tourament said that a "source" is an action.  It was exactly the feint, uncanny dodge, sneak attack senario.  They ruled that no he could not name the creature as a source and prevent an undeclared attack.  It seemed like it wasn't the first time they had encountered that question.

Also the example on page 9 of the rules (under "THE STACK") says "uncanny dodge goes onto the stack above Killing Strike and resolves first: ... chooses to prevent the damage from Killing Strike."  If the intent was creatures are sources I think it would have said Dragon Knight instead.

I expect that in addition to errata the rules will get an updated version sooner or later.



That's how I've been playing it, good to hear.  I really wanted to play in that tournament and/or pick the judge brains, but sadly I could only drop by briefly and had to get back to my booth.  If only it'd been an evening event.
i‘m not sure if this has been addressed before but do you need to make a distinction between your Creature and Order cards? when you hold them, do you hold them altogether or do you need to keep your Order hand from your Creature hand?
i‘m not sure if this has been addressed before but do you need to make a distinction between your Creature and Order cards? when you hold them, do you hold them altogether or do you need to keep your Order hand from your Creature hand?



They have different backs, which suggests to me that they're supposed to be distinguishable in hand.  I don't think there's anything wrong with holding them all at once, but sleeving them all in identical sleeves in order to create confusion is not something I'd allow.

Oh, and of course they also have to be clearly identifiable since you draw up to your creature hand size every turn.  So yeah, which cards are creature as opposed to order cards is and needs to be public information.  Other than that I don't see any problem with holding them at the same time.
Other than that I don't see any problem with holding them at the same time.



Per the tournament rules, the creatures have to be in your left hand, the orders in your right hand, and your pinkie has to be extended.

Or maybe that was just a bad dream.

Unfortunately, thetourney floor rules state that if using sleeves, they must have identical backs (see page 12 of floor rules).

But a player is allowed to know the number of order cards or creature cards an opponant has at any time.

Though, to me, it would have made sense to use two different backed sets of  card sleeves. 

But I suppose using identical sleeves is just like keeping your cards face down in a single pile,
If I have a creature with Flanking, and I use a card that allows an attack at a specific amount of damage (such as make an attack that deals 20 melee), does flanking apply to that attack, making it deal 30 damage?  All this is assuming it has an adjacent ally to make flanking work.
Fear Of The Dark, Fear Of The Dark, I Have A Constant Fear That Something's Always Near; Fear Of The Dark, Fear Of The Dark, I Have A Phobia That Someone's Always There- Iron Maiden Fear of the Dark shall be feared no longer! Let him be praised instead! (Many, many thanks for all your hard work!) - darkwarlock I am Red/Green
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Behind Enemy Lines is a minor action, thus it DOES need a creature to trigger it.

Shadowy Ambush(also Spring Attack) - on pg. 13, it says that the target is declared when you tap your creature to make a melee attack. So, you resolve the shift, then, you resolve the melee attack, at which time you tap the creature and declare the target. This also means that if your creature plays Shadowy ambush, shifts 2 squares, and as a reaction to the shift, a creature uses an interrupt to shift/move out of melee range, such that after the shift 2 there are no adjacent creatures, your creature would NOT be able to legally trigger the melee attack, meaning it would NOT end up tapped.

Riposte- since the immediate action prevents damage, that damage has to already happen, meaning the attack has to already hit, you are now in the damage resolution part of the attack. You wouldn't be able to use Riposte to prevent the attack, just 20 of the damage. Any extra damage would STILL go through, even if the attacking creature ends up dying by the end of the stack.

card sleeves- I believe the rule is that each DECK needs to be in identical sleeves, so all the cards in your creature deck have to be in identical sleeves, and all the cards in your order deck have to be in identical sleeves, but each deck can be in different sleeves, ie. creature in red, order in blue.
card sleeves- I believe the rule is that each DECK needs to be in identical sleeves, so all the cards in your creature deck have to be in identical sleeves, and all the cards in your order deck have to be in identical sleeves, but each deck can be in different sleeves, ie. creature in red, order in blue.



This is the rule: "If a player chooses to use card sleeves, all sleeves must be identical and all cards in his or her deck must be placed in the sleeves in an identical manner."

No mention of decks or separate sleeves used for creatures and orders.


Riposte- since the immediate action prevents damage, that damage has to already happen, meaning the attack has to already hit, you are now in the damage resolution part of the attack. You wouldn't be able to use Riposte to prevent the attack, just 20 of the damage. Any extra damage would STILL go through, even if the attacking creature ends up dying by the end of the stack.



I'm not sure of the source, but supposedly this was from Chris Dupuis (one of the designers, no?)

The following is from a question to Chris Dupuis, game designer:


Question --
"(2) Lethal Damage with Immediates.
Situation: An opponent makes a melee attack and I respond with an Immediate that also does damage (Seize the Opportunity, Riposte, etc.). If the damage from my Immediate is lethal, would the original attack against me not go through because my opponents creature is DEAD and not able to complete the attack? When does the damage from my opponent "hit" me? I'm familiar with the Stack from my days of playing magic, but one of the Wizards GMs at GenCon told me a different story."


Answer --
2. If your immediate would do lethal damage before his attack cleared the stack, his attack would fizzle as he is no longer an eligible attacker. He could always cower your damage to let his attack go off. 

Unfortunately, thetourney floor rules state that if using sleeves, they must have identical backs (see page 12 of floor rules).

But a player is allowed to know the number of order cards or creature cards an opponant has at any time.

Though, to me, it would have made sense to use two different backed sets of  card sleeves. 

But I suppose using identical sleeves is just like keeping your cards face down in a single pile,



I should have downloaded the tournament rules when I had the chance, now my links are broken and the google custom search does nothing  Are you sure they don't mean each deck has to have the same back?  Because requiring identical sleeves for cards that don't have identical backs seems actively counterproductive - way easier to cheat that way!

EDIT: Beaten so hard.  But the second part implies they lifted it from something like Magic ("the deck" not "each deck") so I'd love to get a clarification.  If that's intentional then that's how it is but as a TO I find that rule pretty lame.  Not that DC is super competitive at this point, but I don't relish the idea of judges being called to verify that the cards in each hand are the right kinds of cards. 
thanks guys. i found (i think) the article that addresses this concern:


3.8 Sleeves
Players may use plastic card sleeves or other protective devices on cards. If a player chooses to use card sleeves, all sleeves must be identical and all cards in his or her deck must be placed in the sleeves in an identical manner. If the sleeves feature holograms or other similar markings, cards must be inserted into the sleeves so these markings appear only on the faces of the cards.
During a match, a player may request that a judge inspect an opponent’s card sleeves. The judge may disallow the card sleeves if he or she believes they are marked, worn, or otherwise in a condition or of a design that interferes with shuffling or game play. In the interest of efficiency, the judge may choose to delay any change of sleeves until the end of the match.


 
The order deck and creature deck are seperate decks. Each deck must follow the above rules individually, but not together.
The order deck and creature deck are seperate decks. Each deck must follow the above rules individually, but not together.



i personally think that this should be the case. having played other card games that uses more than 1 deck, it's always been ruled out to have unidentical sleeves for each of the decks.
On page 13 under the “Distance and Counting” side bar, first bullet says “The acting creature must have a line of sight to the target unless otherwise specified.” So must a creature have a line of sight to the hex it wishes to target with the “Fireball” card? Would this also apply to playing “Fire Trap”?


"The acting creature must have line of sight to the target unless otherwise specified."  Since Fireball and Fire Trap do not specify that LoS is not needed, the creature using those order cards will need LoS to the target squares.

Sorry if this has already been mentioned elsewhere but the 'distances and counting' sidebar refers to 'whenever you need to determine distance', so should only relate to orders that specify a range. Fireball specifies a range and an area of effect (range 5 then area within 2).

Fire Trap does not specify any range (it just says 'choose 1 hazardous terrain square'), it does specify an area of effect (within 2).

By implication, Fire Trap has no listed range, so why are you applying the rule about ranged attacks?

I understand that once you've chosen which square you have to have LoE etc. from that square to effect models caught in the blast.

But the way I read that card was as simple as the wording on it.

No range measured between model playing order and square chosen so LoS rules do not apply.

Same with cover, it applies against 'ranged attacks'. That needs clearing up with 'area attacks', are they 'ranged' or not?

Maybe the Fire Trap card needs an errata, but as it is, it simply is not a ranged attack, so ranged attack rules should not apply.

If it has not been cleared up already, could someone do so, as ToG deploy area is just asking to be fire trapped?
Shadowy Ambush(also Spring Attack) - on pg. 13, it says that the target is declared when you tap your creature to make a melee attack. So, you resolve the shift, then, you resolve the melee attack, at which time you tap the creature and declare the target. This also means that if your creature plays Shadowy ambush, shifts 2 squares, and as a reaction to the shift, a creature uses an interrupt to shift/move out of melee range, such that after the shift 2 there are no adjacent creatures, your creature would NOT be able to legally trigger the melee attack, meaning it would NOT end up tapped.

Rule on p13 relates to basic melee attacks. Shadowy Ambush is a Standard action order card, not a basic melee attack.

As such relevant rules are:

p.11 'When you play an order card on a creature you control, it becomes the acting creature for that card and takes the specified action or actions.'

p. 8 'You choose the targets for an order card when you play it.'

p.12 'Taking a standard action taps the acting creature.'

Your comments completely contradict what is written in the base game rules.

Even if there is no legal target for the attack once you have shifted, you have still played a standard action order card, so are tapped.

Think about Sping Attack in light of what you are suggesting about Shadowy Ambush.

It would become 'shift 6, untap, shift 6', which is just absurd Tongue Out
On page 13 under the “Distance and Counting” side bar, first bullet says “The acting creature must have a line of sight to the target unless otherwise specified.” So must a creature have a line of sight to the hex it wishes to target with the “Fireball” card? Would this also apply to playing “Fire Trap”?


"The acting creature must have line of sight to the target unless otherwise specified."  Since Fireball and Fire Trap do not specify that LoS is not needed, the creature using those order cards will need LoS to the target squares.

Sorry if this has already been mentioned elsewhere but the 'distances and counting' sidebar refers to 'whenever you need to determine distance', so should only relate to orders that specify a range. Fireball specifies a range and an area of effect (range 5 then area within 2).

Fire Trap does not specify any range (it just says 'choose 1 hazardous terrain square'), it does specify an area of effect (within 2).

By implication, Fire Trap has no listed range, so why are you applying the rule about ranged attacks?

I understand that once you've chosen which square you have to have LoE etc. from that square to effect models caught in the blast.

But the way I read that card was as simple as the wording on it.

No range measured between model playing order and square chosen so LoS rules do not apply.

Same with cover, it applies against 'ranged attacks'. That needs clearing up with 'area attacks', are they 'ranged' or not?

Maybe the Fire Trap card needs an errata, but as it is, it simply is not a ranged attack, so ranged attack rules should not apply.

If it has not been cleared up already, could someone do so, as ToG deploy area is just asking to be fire trapped?



I think that whoever is using the Fireball has to have line of sight to the square they want to Fireball.  If not, it allows them to drop the fireball in a room (see the Tyranny of Goblin tiles) and completely negates the benefit of obstacles.  I'm currently playing that you need LoS with Fireball to the square you want to hit.  Anything else just seems like it breaks the spirit of the game.

Fear Of The Dark, Fear Of The Dark, I Have A Constant Fear That Something's Always Near; Fear Of The Dark, Fear Of The Dark, I Have A Phobia That Someone's Always There- Iron Maiden Fear of the Dark shall be feared no longer! Let him be praised instead! (Many, many thanks for all your hard work!) - darkwarlock I am Red/Green
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I think that whoever is using the Fireball has to have line of sight to the square they want to Fireball.  If not, it allows them to drop the fireball in a room (see the Tyranny of Goblin tiles) and completely negates the benefit of obstacles.  I'm currently playing that you need LoS with Fireball to the square you want to hit.  Anything else just seems like it breaks the spirit of the game.


That's how I play it.  The caster of Fireball needs to have LoS to the targeted square.  Then, LoS from that square is used to determine which creatures take damage from it.

I think that whoever is using the Fireball has to have line of sight to the square they want to Fireball.  If not, it allows them to drop the fireball in a room (see the Tyranny of Goblin tiles) and completely negates the benefit of obstacles.  I'm currently playing that you need LoS with Fireball to the square you want to hit.  Anything else just seems like it breaks the spirit of the game.


That's how I play it.  The caster of Fireball needs to have LoS to the targeted square.  Then, LoS from that square is used to determine which creatures take damage from it.




I think you just need LoS to the targeted square.  After that, it doesn't matter if you have LoS to the creatures.  The Fireball just explodes and hits them.  That seems to me the way to do it.
Fear Of The Dark, Fear Of The Dark, I Have A Constant Fear That Something's Always Near; Fear Of The Dark, Fear Of The Dark, I Have A Phobia That Someone's Always There- Iron Maiden Fear of the Dark shall be feared no longer! Let him be praised instead! (Many, many thanks for all your hard work!) - darkwarlock I am Red/Green
I am Red/Green
Take The Magic Dual Colour Test - Beta today!
Created with Rum and Monkey's Personality Test Generator.
I'm both instinctive and emotional. I value my own instincts and desires, and either ignore or crush anything that stands in my way; planning and foresight are unnecessary. At best, I'm determined and fierce; at worst, I'm headstrong and infantile.
Check out my DnD blog! www.artificersintuition.blogspot.com
Yes, the Fireball is an area effect. You only need LOS to the square it explodes in. From there you simply count squares because the effect itself doesn't target.
The creature being hit does need LoS from the square that is targetted though, right? For example, you can't drop a fireball against a wall, and count squares through that wall. 

(This seems obvious to me, so hopefully that really is the case) 
The creature being hit does need LoS from the square that is targetted though, right? For example, you can't drop a fireball against a wall, and count squares through that wall. 

(This seems obvious to me, so hopefully that really is the case) 


It needs line of effect, not line of sight. The difference is that LOS requires a straight line. LOE can go around corners if the area of effect is large enough. So, the blast can't go through the wall, but it can try to go around the wall. Also, enemy creatures can block LOS, but not LOE.
 I have a couple of rules questions, if I may.

 Spells like "Web" or "Faerie Fire" don't specifiy a range. I've been playing that they only require Line of Site but I wasn't sure if there was anything else I was missing. 

 Cliff Walls on the Outdoor side of the tiles: Do they act like the Dungeon Walls, as in block movement and line of site? I mean, from a visual perspective it looks like I could shoot some arrows down slope, as it were. Also, can the Copper Dragon fly across them? I mean, he can fly.     
 I have a couple of rules questions, if I may.

 Spells like "Web" or "Faerie Fire" don't specifiy a range. I've been playing that they only require Line of Site but I wasn't sure if there was anything else I was missing. 

 Cliff Walls on the Outdoor side of the tiles: Do they act like the Dungeon Walls, as in block movement and line of site? I mean, from a visual perspective it looks like I could shoot some arrows down slope, as it were. Also, can the Copper Dragon fly across them? I mean, he can fly.     

Doesn't Web have a range?  It says attach to one creature within 10 squares.  So I thought it was LOS 10 squares.

I believe the cliffs are just the same as walls in the dungeon.  I figured they go up, as in mountain cliffs.  That being said I am almost 100% sure the dragon must fly around, same as the dungeon wall.
From the rulebook:

Flyi ng: Creatures such as the Copper Dragon are able to fly
over the battlefield when they move. In game terms, the Flying
power lets a creature freely enter squares that contain enemy
creatures and move past such creatures without stopping first.
The creature also ignores difficult and hazardous terrain and
obstacles. Walls still block its movement.

Walls: Indoor walls
separate areas of the
dungeon; outdoor walls
are cliffs and other high
formations.
 Thanks, I had a feeling, but I did want to double check.
 Okay, 'nother question.
 
 Can I play Riposte if the creature would still die from the attack? I've been playing it as "No", because I figure, hey you can't Riposte if you're dead; but I'd like to be sure.
 Okay, 'nother question.
 
 Can I play Riposte if the creature would still die from the attack? I've been playing it as "No", because I figure, hey you can't Riposte if you're dead; but I'd like to be sure.



Your opponent's creature's attack goes on the stack.
You play Riposte in response. It goes on the stack.
You resolve from the top of the stack: Riposte. You deal damage to your opponent's creature.
If the opponent's creature is still alive, its attack resolves, minus the damage you prevented. It kills your creature (unless you decide to cower for the remaining damage).
If the opponent's creature is not alive, its attack fizzles.

So yes, you can.
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