Alignment

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Very happy to see the Good, Neutral, Evil and Lawful, Neutral, Chaotic dynamic return. 

Not sure why in the hells they thought it would be "neat" to mess with it in the first place, but I'm glad it's back.

That is all.
D&D Next - Basic and Expert Editions

I firmly believe that there should be two editions of the game; the core rules released as a "Basic" set and a more complicated expanded rules edition released as an "Expert" set. These two editions would provide separate entry points to the game; one for new players or players that want a more classic D&D game and another entry point for experienced gamers that want more options and all the other things they have come to expect from previous editions.

Also, they must release several rules modules covering the main elements of the game (i.e., classes, races, combat, magic, monsters, etc.) upon launch to further expand the game for those that still need more complexity in a particular element of the game.


Here's a mockup of the Basic Set I created.



(CLICK HERE TO VIEW LARGER IMAGE)
  

Basic Set

This boxed set contains a simple, "bare bones" edition of the game; the core rules. It's for those that want a rules-light edition of the game that is extremely modifiable or for new players that get intimidated easily by too many rules and/or options. The Basic Set contains everything needed to play with all the "classic" D&D races (i.e., Human, Dwarf, Elf, and Halfling) and classes (i.e., Cleric, Fighter, Rogue, Wizard) all the way up to maximum level (i.e., 20th Level).

The Basic boxed set contains:

Quick Start Rules
A "choose your own way" adventure intended as an intro to RPGs and basic D&D terms.

Player's Handbook
(Softcover, 125 pages)
Features rules for playing the classic D&D races and classes all the way up to 20th level.

Dungeon Master's Guide

(Softcover, 125 pages)
Includes the basic rules for dungeon masters.

Monster Manual
(Softcover, 100 pages)
Includes all the classic iconic monsters from D&D. 

Introductory Adventure
(Keep on the Borderlands)
An introductory adventure for beginning players and DMs.

Also includes: 

Character Sheets
Reference Sheets
Set of Dice


Expert Set

A set of hardbound rules that contains the core rules plus expanded races and classes, more spells and a large selection of optional rules modules — that is, pretty much everything that experienced players have come to expect. Each expert edition manual may be purchased separately, or in a boxed set. The Expert set includes:

Expert PHB (Hardcover, 225 pages. $35 Includes core rules plus 10 playable races, 10 character classes, expanded selection of spells and rules modules for players.)
Expert DMG (Hardcover, 250 pages. $35 Includes core rules plus expanded rules modules for DMs.)
Expert MM (Hardcover, 225 pages. $35 Includes an expanded list of monsters and creatures to challenge characters)


Expansions

These expansion rules modules can be used with both the Basic and Expert sets. Each expansion covers one specific aspect of the game, such as character creation, combat, spells, monsters, etc.) 

Hall of Heroes (Hardcover, 225 pages. $35 Includes a vast selection of playable character races and classes, new and old all in one book)
Combat and Tactics (Hardcover, 225 pages. $35 Includes dozens of new and old optional rules for combat all in one book)
Creature Compendium (Hardcover, 350 pages.$35 Includes hundreds of monsters, new and old all in one book)
The Grimoire (Hardcover, 225 pages. $35 Includes hundreds of new and old spells all in one book)





A Million Hit Points of Light: Shedding Light on Damage

A Million Hit Points of Light: Shedding Light on Damage and Hit Points

In my personal campaigns, I use the following system for damage and dying. It's a slight modification of the long-standing principles etsablished by the D&D game, only with a new definition of what 0 or less hit points means. I've been using it for years because it works really well. However, I've made some adjustments to take advantage of the D&D Next rules. I've decided to present the first part in a Q&A format for better clarity. So let's begin...

What are hit points?
The premise is very simple, but often misunderstood; hit points are an abstraction that represent the character's ability to avoid serious damage, not necessarily their ability to take serious damage. This is a very important distinction. They represent a combination of skillful maneuvering, toughness, stamina and luck. Some targets have more hit points because they are physically tougher and are harder to injure...others have more because they are experienced combatants and have learned how to turn near fatal blows into mere scratches by skillful maneuvering...and then others are just plain lucky. Once a character runs out of hit points they become vulnerable to serious life-threatening injuries.

So what exactly does it mean to "hit" with a successful attack roll, then?
It means that through your own skill and ability you may have wounded your target if the target lacks the hit points to avoid the full brunt of the attack. That's an important thing to keep in mind; a successful "hit" does not necessarily mean you physically damaged your target. It just means that your attack was well placed and forced the target to exert themselves in such a way as to leave them vulnerable to further attacks. For example, instead of severing the target's arm, the attack merely grazes them leaving a minor cut.

But the attack did 25 points of damage! Why did it only "graze" the target?
Because the target has more than 25 hit points. Your attack forced them to exert a lot of energy to avoid the attack, but because of their combat skill, toughness, stamina and luck, they managed to avoid being seriously injured. However, because of this attack, they may not have the reserves to avoid your next attack. Perhaps you knocked them off balance or the attack left them so fatigued they lack the stamina to evade another attack. It's the DM's call on how they want to narrate the exact reason the blow didn't kill or wound the target.

Yeah, but what about "touch" attacks that rely on physical contact?
Making physical contact with a target is a lot different than striking them, so these types of attacks are the exception. If a touch attack succeeds, the attacker manages to make contact with their target.

If hit points and weapon damage don't always represent actual damage to the target, then what does it represent?
Think of the damage from an attack as more like a "threat level" rather than actual physical damage that transfers directly to the target's body. That is, the more damage an attack does, the harder it is to avoid serious injury. For example, an attack that causes 14 points of damage is more likely to wound the target than 3 points of damage (depending on how many hit points the target has left). The higher the damage, the greater the chance is that the target will become seriously injured. So, an attack that does 34 points of damage could be thought of as a "threat level of 34." If the target doesn't have the hit points to negate that threat, they become seriously injured.

Ok, but shouldn't armor reduce the amount of damage delivered from an attack?
It does reduce damage; by making it harder for an attack to cause serious injury. A successful hit against an armored target suggests that the attack may have circumvented the target's armor by striking in a vulnerable area.

What about poison and other types of non-combat damage?
Hit point loss from non-physical forms of damage represents the character spitting the poison out just in time before it takes full strength or perhaps the poison just wasn't strong enough to affect them drastically, but still weakens them. Again, it's the DMs call on how to narrate the reasons why the character avoids serious harm from the damage.

If hit points don't don't represent actual damage then how does that make sense with spells like Cure Serious Wounds and other forms of healing like healer kits with bandages?
Hit points do represent some physical damage, just not serious physical damage. Healing magic and other forms of healing still affect these minor wounds just as well as more serious wounds. For example, bandaging up minor cuts and abrasions helps the character rejuvenate and relieve the pain and/or fatigue of hit point loss. The key thing to remember is that it's an abstraction that allows the DM freedom to interpret and narrate it as they see fit.

What if my attack reduces the target to 0 or less hit points?
If a player is reduced to 0 or less hit points they are wounded. If a monster or NPC is reduce to 0 or less hit points they are killed.

Why are monsters killed immediately and not players?
Because unless the monsters are crucial to the story, it makes combat resolution much faster. It is assumed that players immediately execute a coup de grace on wounded monsters as a finishing move.

What if a character is wounded by poison or other types of non-physical damage?
If a character becomes wounded from non-combat damage they still receive the effects of being wounded, regardless if they show any physical signs of injury (i.e., internal injuries are still considered injuries).

Ok. I get it...but what happens once a character is wounded?
See below.
 

Damage and Dying

Once a character is reduced to 0 or less hit points, they start taking real damage. In other words, their reserves have run out and they can no longer avoid taking serious damage.

  1. Characters are fully operational as long as they have 1 hit point or more. They may have minor cuts, bruises, and superficial wounds, but they are are not impaired significantly. 
  2. Once they reach 0 or less hit points, they become Wounded (see below).That is, they have sustained a wound that impairs their ability to perform actions.
  3. If they reach a negative amount of hit points equal or greater than their Constitution score, they are Incapacitated. This means they are in critical condition and could possibly die.
  4. Characters will die if their hit points reach a negative amount greater than their Constitution score, plus their current level.

Unharmed: 1 hp or more
Wounded: 0 hp or less
Incapacitated: -(Constitution) to -(Constitution+Level)
Dead: Less than -(Constitution +Level)

Wounded
When the character reaches 0 or less hit points they become wounded. Wounded characters receive disadvantage on all attacks and saving throws until they heal back up to 1 hit point or more. This allows for a transitory stage between healthy and dying, without having to mess around with impairment rules while the character still has hit points left.

Incapacitated
Characters begin dying when they reach a negative amount of hit points equal to their Constitution score. At which point, they must make a DC 10 Constitution saving throw on each of their following turns (the disadvantage from being wounded does not apply for these saving throws).

If successful, the character remains dying, but their condition does not worsen.

If the saving throw fails, another DC 10 Constitution saving throw must be made. If that one fails, the character succumbs to their wounds and dies. If successful, the character stabilizes and is no longer dying.

Finally, if a dying character receives first aid or healing at any point, they immediately stabilize.

Dead
Characters will die if they reach a negative amount of hit points equal to their Constitution, plus their current level. Thus, if an 8th level character with a Constitution score of 12 is down to 4 hit points then takes 24 points of damage (reducing their hit points to -20) the attack kills them outright.

I agree with you, alignment is a staple of D&D. It is something I think belongs in the core of the Game.
I don't know. Some of the alignments never made much sense. I still don't understand the difference between LE and NE. And CN always struck me as a cover for players who wanted to play evil and just say they were crazy instead. Also Unaligned is a far more sensible and rational alignment than neutral.

That being said for all that I like about 4th edition alignment, they may have thrown out the baby with the bathwater. CG was always a fun alignment that had serious distinctions from NG, and the clear dileanation between the good/evil axis and the law/chaos axis drew distinction between your goals and your methods, which the simplified 4e rules sorrowly lacked.

I just hope they do a better job of describing exactly what each alignment means, or different things that it can mean, in a way that resolves my issues with the old system. 
I don't mind aligments but I do hope they will have little or no interaction with game mechanics.
The outdated, cumbersome, pointless monstrosity that is alignment needs to be banished to the deepest dungeon, then banished to an even deeper dungeon.

On the MOON.
Another day, another three or four entries to my Ignore List.
Alignment is usefull as a roleplaying tool and perhaps as a defining aspect of a character, but not as a source of conflict. 

Good vs. evil is fine, law vs. chaos not so much.



  It's about as much a roleplaying tool as saying only humans can be XYZ or saying that two different PC races attack one another on sight.

  In that yes, it is another factor to take into account that influences the character; but that doesn't mean it can't be replaced with a more elegant concept or removed outright.

  Instead, characters should be given actual priorities and explain the lengths their character will go to in the protection/pursuit of those priorities.
The outdated, cumbersome, pointless monstrosity that is alignment needs to be banished to the deepest dungeon, then banished to an even deeper dungeon.

On the MOON.



+1

And then to another galaxy.

Leroy Jethro Gibbs NCIS "A slap to the face is humiliating. A slap to the back of the head is a wake up call."

 

Love 4e? Concerned about its future? join the Old Guard of 4th Edition

As long as it only remains a RP tool, i like the dual axis.

As soon as they start adding smite evil, or protection from lawful, then i'll agree with the burying it.

guides
List of no-action attacks.
Dynamic vs Static Bonuses
Phalanx tactics and builds
Crivens! A Pictsies Guide Good
Power
s to intentionally miss with
Mr. Cellophane: How to be unnoticed
Way's to fire around corners
Crits: what their really worth
Retroactive bonus vs Static bonus.
Runepriest handbook & discussion thread
Holy Symbols to hang around your neck
Ways to Gain or Downgrade Actions
List of bonuses to saving throws
The Ghost with the Most (revenant handbook)
my builds
F-111 Interdictor Long (200+ squares) distance ally teleporter. With some warlord stuff. Broken in a plot way, not a power way.

Thought Switch Higher level build that grants upto 14 attacks on turn 1. If your allies play along, it's broken.

Elven Critters Crit op with crit generation. 5 of these will end anything. Broken.

King Fisher Optimized net user.  Moderate.

Boominator Fun catch-22 booming blade build with either strong or completely broken damage depending on your reading.

Very Distracting Warlock Lot's of dazing and major penalties to hit. Overpowered.

Pocket Protector Pixie Stealth Knight. Maximizing the defender's aura by being in an ally's/enemy's square.

Yakuza NinjIntimiAdin: Perma-stealth Striker that offers a little protection for ally's, and can intimidate bloodied enemies. Very Strong.

Chargeburgler with cheese Ranged attacks at the end of a charge along with perma-stealth. Solid, could be overpowered if tweaked.

Void Defender Defends giving a penalty to hit anyone but him, then removing himself from play. Can get somewhat broken in epic.

Scry and Die Attacking from around corners, while staying hidden. Moderate to broken, depending on the situation.

Skimisher Fly in, attack, and fly away. Also prevents enemies from coming close. Moderate to Broken depending on the enemy, but shouldn't make the game un-fun, as the rest of your team is at risk, and you have enough weaknesses.

Indestructible Simply won't die, even if you sleep though combat.  One of THE most abusive character in 4e.

Sir Robin (Bravely Charge Away) He automatically slows and pushes an enemy (5 squares), while charging away. Hard to rate it's power level, since it's terrain dependent.

Death's Gatekeeper A fun twist on a healic, making your party "unkillable". Overpowered to Broken, but shouldn't actually make the game un-fun, just TPK proof.

Death's Gatekeeper mk2, (Stealth Edition) Make your party "unkillable", and you hidden, while doing solid damage. Stronger then the above, but also easier for a DM to shut down. Broken, until your DM get's enough of it.

Domination and Death Dominate everything then kill them quickly. Only works @ 30, but is broken multiple ways.

Battlemind Mc Prone-Daze Protecting your allies by keeping enemies away. Quite powerful.

The Retaliator Getting hit deals more damage to the enemy then you receive yourself, and you can take plenty of hits. Heavy item dependency, Broken.

Dead Kobold Transit Teleports 98 squares a turn, and can bring someone along for the ride. Not fully built, so i can't judge the power.

Psilent Guardian Protect your allies, while being invisible. Overpowered, possibly broken.

Rune of Vengance Do lot's of damage while boosting your teams. Strong to slightly overpowered.

Charedent BarrageA charging ardent. Fine in a normal team, overpowered if there are 2 together, and easily broken in teams of 5.

Super Knight A tough, sticky, high damage knight. Strong.

Super Duper Knight Basically the same as super knight with items, making it far more broken.

Mora, the unkillable avenger Solid damage, while being neigh indestuctable. Overpowered, but not broken.

Swordburst Maximus At-Will Close Burst 3 that slide and prones. Protects allies with off actions. Strong, possibly over powered with the right party.

Very happy to see the Good, Neutral, Evil and Lawful, Neutral, Chaotic dynamic return. 

Not sure why in the hells they thought it would be "neat" to mess with it in the first place, but I'm glad it's back.

That is all.


I don't really care what alignments they include or how they describe them. I've told my players that they can be Purple Evil (cookie for whoever gets the reference) for all that I care.

What I do care about is whether or not alignment is intertwined into the mechanics of the game (alignment restrictions based on class, smite alignment, detect alignment, etc), because that is a dealbreaker for me. As long as I can freely and EASILY ignore whatever alignment garbage is put in there, I don't care what else they do with it.
Owner and Proprietor of the House of Trolls. God of ownership and possession.
I will add that i ran a lawful evil cleric of pelor. (I rolled for alignment).

He ran his temple like the CEO of a hospital. He would heal people who could pay, but charge them for the rest of their lives. He spread the word of pelor, but only because more followers = more donnations and more power.

guides
List of no-action attacks.
Dynamic vs Static Bonuses
Phalanx tactics and builds
Crivens! A Pictsies Guide Good
Power
s to intentionally miss with
Mr. Cellophane: How to be unnoticed
Way's to fire around corners
Crits: what their really worth
Retroactive bonus vs Static bonus.
Runepriest handbook & discussion thread
Holy Symbols to hang around your neck
Ways to Gain or Downgrade Actions
List of bonuses to saving throws
The Ghost with the Most (revenant handbook)
my builds
F-111 Interdictor Long (200+ squares) distance ally teleporter. With some warlord stuff. Broken in a plot way, not a power way.

Thought Switch Higher level build that grants upto 14 attacks on turn 1. If your allies play along, it's broken.

Elven Critters Crit op with crit generation. 5 of these will end anything. Broken.

King Fisher Optimized net user.  Moderate.

Boominator Fun catch-22 booming blade build with either strong or completely broken damage depending on your reading.

Very Distracting Warlock Lot's of dazing and major penalties to hit. Overpowered.

Pocket Protector Pixie Stealth Knight. Maximizing the defender's aura by being in an ally's/enemy's square.

Yakuza NinjIntimiAdin: Perma-stealth Striker that offers a little protection for ally's, and can intimidate bloodied enemies. Very Strong.

Chargeburgler with cheese Ranged attacks at the end of a charge along with perma-stealth. Solid, could be overpowered if tweaked.

Void Defender Defends giving a penalty to hit anyone but him, then removing himself from play. Can get somewhat broken in epic.

Scry and Die Attacking from around corners, while staying hidden. Moderate to broken, depending on the situation.

Skimisher Fly in, attack, and fly away. Also prevents enemies from coming close. Moderate to Broken depending on the enemy, but shouldn't make the game un-fun, as the rest of your team is at risk, and you have enough weaknesses.

Indestructible Simply won't die, even if you sleep though combat.  One of THE most abusive character in 4e.

Sir Robin (Bravely Charge Away) He automatically slows and pushes an enemy (5 squares), while charging away. Hard to rate it's power level, since it's terrain dependent.

Death's Gatekeeper A fun twist on a healic, making your party "unkillable". Overpowered to Broken, but shouldn't actually make the game un-fun, just TPK proof.

Death's Gatekeeper mk2, (Stealth Edition) Make your party "unkillable", and you hidden, while doing solid damage. Stronger then the above, but also easier for a DM to shut down. Broken, until your DM get's enough of it.

Domination and Death Dominate everything then kill them quickly. Only works @ 30, but is broken multiple ways.

Battlemind Mc Prone-Daze Protecting your allies by keeping enemies away. Quite powerful.

The Retaliator Getting hit deals more damage to the enemy then you receive yourself, and you can take plenty of hits. Heavy item dependency, Broken.

Dead Kobold Transit Teleports 98 squares a turn, and can bring someone along for the ride. Not fully built, so i can't judge the power.

Psilent Guardian Protect your allies, while being invisible. Overpowered, possibly broken.

Rune of Vengance Do lot's of damage while boosting your teams. Strong to slightly overpowered.

Charedent BarrageA charging ardent. Fine in a normal team, overpowered if there are 2 together, and easily broken in teams of 5.

Super Knight A tough, sticky, high damage knight. Strong.

Super Duper Knight Basically the same as super knight with items, making it far more broken.

Mora, the unkillable avenger Solid damage, while being neigh indestuctable. Overpowered, but not broken.

Swordburst Maximus At-Will Close Burst 3 that slide and prones. Protects allies with off actions. Strong, possibly over powered with the right party.

Why slam alignment? I agree with those who say that alignment is a good concept. For me it has always been a great way of getting a general idea of how NPCs will act. It's better when there are more options I think.

Of course I've always felt that alignments have been open to interpretation. In first edition the explanations of alignments were a bit odd to me. So I decided to adapt them a little to my own preferences. What I'm saying about alignments are my own interpretations, which are heavily influenced by a lot of things I've read about D&D through the years.

Regarding Neutral Evil vs. Chaotic Evil: A NE character is mostly a self serving bastard without principles. One could say he has a broken moral compass. He doesn't really care about what's right or wrong as long as he gets his base desires fulfilled. He is often a hedonist without any clear goals or ideals. A NE character is often much more passively inclined than those of the other two evil alignments. 

A CE character on the other hand often has very strong feelings about the right of the strong to rule over the weak. He will lie, steal, cheat and murder to get to the top of the heap. For him, laws and regulations are for the unworthy. A CE ruler for example respects nothing but strength and may not even believe that weak creatures have a right to exist unless they are his slaves. CE characters are driven and motivated. Feelings like lust, greed, hatred and so on are important to them.

I think the most misunderstood alignment is lawful good. Despite a lot having been written about LG not being an alignment of pushover pixy dust paladins with rubber swords that always have to help and be nice because they are LG, a lot of people used to interpret it that way. I seem to remember it even being written in the second edititon core books that its not like that at all.

In one adventure I ran, the party had to somehow get a piece of an artifact from a lawful good gold dragon. The dragon was in fact a collector of artifacts and extremely reluctant to give it up. When the party claimed that the artifact rightfully belonged to the human king of their realm, the dragon answered that although it didn't hate humans, it regarded them as a fickle and somewhat unworthy species that didn't deserve to own such a powerful item. Besides, the gold dragon argued, it belonged to a higher order of beings that didn't need to bow down to human laws. There was a great deal of arguing back and forth and in the end the party managed to convince the dragon that the artifact was stolen goods. The dragon didn't like this one bit but claimed that it had payed something that amounted to a king's ransom for the artifact, and that it had acted in good faith. It offered the party a deal: fetch an object of equal value and make a trade. (I feel most dragons are obsessed with their treasure hoards regardless of alignment) At this point one of the characters unfortunately lost patience and a battle ensued. The dragon wiped out half the party with no real hope of res etc. and they drew the ire of some powerful friends of the gold dragon...
(The dragon had to flee from its lair temporarily, so the party could recover the artifact piece)

Anyway, the way I see it this is not an unlikely encounter with a lawful good creature at all.
I think alignment is a good guideline but certainly not something that has to be part of the game if players don't want it. Of course, if your Paladin decides to get up one day and start slaughtering orc children then he might be in store for some...divine intervention. 
Check out my Dungeons and Dragons Blog It's +4 to all awesome rolls.
The outdated, cumbersome, pointless monstrosity that is alignment needs to be banished to the deepest dungeon, then banished to an even deeper dungeon.

On the MOON.


+1

Only some specific classes like the paladin need a limitation here and it suffices to say "don't be evil and follow some conducts"

Basic question should be: Does the system needs it? How does it influence via system?
And if the answer is something like "Barbarians can't multiclass into monks" well, that's not that effective. (as for a clerics spells, a player should be intelligent enough to figure out if his deeds correspond to his faith)

Alignment might be useful as a tool for background creation tough, just as the other traits 4e mentions in the character generation chapter (note that they have zero influence on the system which is good)

Alignment was nice for video games based on D&D like NWN, to regulate if your companions agree with you.

Also static.fjcdn.com/large/pictures/fd/8c/fd... (alignment is not as sharp as one might think it'd be)
edit: bah, redirect... just google for batman and alignment.
I like aligment, and the allegiance system from d20 Modern like a extra guideline help.

But for me the headache is Chaotic Good. Chaotic shouldn´t be anarchy.

I think aligment is how characters´behavior toward people with different allegyance.

For example:

A hassasin is totally loyal to his secret brotherood, like if he were LE but for the rest of the world is CE.

A superstitious barbarian can be honorable and totally obedient to his tribe chief, like LN, but for foreigners is CN.

A drunk bard hafling is totally loyal to elve princess, like LG, but his behavior for folks from other countries, is like CG.

* Spells and powers with aligment key should hurts enemies with identical aligment but different allegiance.  

"Say me what you're showing off for, and I'll say you what you lack!" (Spanish saying)

 

Book 13 Anaclet 23 Confucius said: "The Superior Man is in harmony but does not follow the crowd. The inferior man follows the crowd, but is not in harmony"

 

"In a country well governed, poverty is something to be ashamed of. In a country badly governed, wealth is something to be ashamed of." - Confucius 


* Spells and powers with aligment key should hurts enemies with identical aligment but different allegiance  be removed.



Aligment is fine as nostalgia or for people for whom it makes sense but there is very very little reason to hardcode it into the game so it gets shoved down everybody's throat. Especially since 5e is supposed to be modular and all that.
You can´t avoid the possible future powers with "allegiance" key. 

The aligment key showed you divine spells like samples of the holy sacred gift by D&D deities to divine spellcaster, or evil dark arts. Some powers were too cruel and painful to be used by good characters, or only they can be casted by enoughly pure believer.

And lots of spell were created specifically to hurts monsters with aligment like outsiders.  

Without aligment key the subtype aligment for monsters like outsiders woudn´t be necessary any more. 

"Say me what you're showing off for, and I'll say you what you lack!" (Spanish saying)

 

Book 13 Anaclet 23 Confucius said: "The Superior Man is in harmony but does not follow the crowd. The inferior man follows the crowd, but is not in harmony"

 

"In a country well governed, poverty is something to be ashamed of. In a country badly governed, wealth is something to be ashamed of." - Confucius 

For all that I'm solidly against alignment having any mechanical implications (at least in the core game), I rather like the 'traditional' D&D nine-alignment system. To me, the 4e version just felt... incomplete... like the designers included it as a lame "won't really please anyone but at least none of us actively hate it" compromise between the older system and getting rid of alignment altogether. The silly sports team analogy they used just made it seem even worse.

That said, I use slightly different definitions of the nine alignments than the 'official' descriptions (which I agree have never been very clear or satisfying). In my version, 'Law' and 'Chaos' describe whether the character feels order and cooperation are more or less important than freedom and individuality, while 'Good' and 'Evil' describe how far the character is willing to go in order to achieve his or her goals.

Here is how I'd write the 5e alignment descriptions:

LG: "Stay back, villain! I don't want to kill you, but I will not allow you to harm another innocent." The character feels that people should live together in well-ordered communities, where everybody knows their place and obeys the rules. He is willing to sacrifice his own wellbeing, even his life, to protect the innocent and to build a better world for everybody. A lawful good adventurer is a true hero, but it is a difficult path to walk. Few such individuals survive long enough to retire, but most would not wish to retire anyway so long as there are still innocents who suffer and villains who profit by that suffering.

NG: "I do what I can. Sometimes it's not much, but I'll leave this world a better place than I found it." The character values order and freedom equally, feeling that it is more important to do whatever works in making the world a better place, rather than being tied to any particular ideology or methodology. She's willing to sacrifice herself to protect the innocent from real harm, but not merely to uphold civilization or liberty as abstract ideals. Most genuinely heroic adventurers are neutral good, though they rarely become as famous (or infamous) as their lawful or chaotic counterparts.

CG: "She can marry whoever she wants. She's your daughter, not your slave!" The character feels that people are fundamentally individuals and that laws and traditions should be kept to an absolute minimum (and always be open to reform) to avoid oppressing people. She's willing to sacrifice her own life or liberty to ensure freedom for everyone. Chaotic good adventurers are idealistic rebels who fight tyranny wherever they find it. The common people often adore them, though the authorities generally view them as unpredictable trouble-makers at best.

LN: "It's not my place to say if it's wrong or right. It's the law. If you want to change it, you should go about it the proper way." The character feels that people should work together toward common goals, and that a strong system of laws or traditions is vital to prevent society from collapsing into anarchy. He is no zealot: he will not countenance torture or the killing of innocents, even to uphold the law, but he is also very reluctant to risk his own skin for the sake of others unless it is his clear duty to do so. Lawful neutral characters almost never become adventurers by choice, though they can be forced into that life through circumstance or dragged into it by a less risk-averse friend or loved one.

TN: "I don't have time for a pointless philosophical debate. Just let me go about my business." The character sees no advantage to either law or chaos, and isn't interested in either forcing others to do her will, nor in putting herself out for the benefit of anyone other than close friends or family. This might be because she has decided to take a balanced path through life, but more likely she just has never thought very much about how the world ought to work. Most ordinary humans, elves, halflings and other intelligent humanoids are true neutral, though such an alignment rarely leads an individual into the adventuring life.

CN: "So long as ya don't hurt no-one, do what ya want. That's my motto." The character values his own freedom very highly indeed, but he's not completely ruthless about it. He might steal, but he won't take food from a starving child. He might kill, but only in self-defence. He feels no obligations to people he doesn't know, but he can still stick up for his friends. This is a common alignment among those who take up the adventuring life for fun or profit rather than out of idealism.

LE: "I take no pleasure in this, but your death will be a lesson to others that sedition will not be tolerated." The character feels that order must be maintained, no matter the cost, because anarchy is much worse than a little oppression. Torture and execution of those who break the rules are acceptable in order to discourage others from following suit (although torturing and killing people just because you enjoy it or for personal gain are not). A lawful character who is willing to inflict suffering and death on the innocent in pursuit of his goals is lawful evil, even if he shares those goals with lawful good characters. Lawful evil villains often genuinely see themselves as noble heroes.

NE: "Illegal or not, I'm the one with the loaded crossbow." The character doesn't care about the sort of society she lives in, just so long as she can profit from it. She is willing to give lip service to the laws and traditions of the society around her, while she does whatever she likes in private. Like other evil characters, she doesn't baulk at murder, torture and other heinous acts. Unlike her lawful counterparts, she doesn't try to justify her villainy as being in pursuit of a higher cause. She does these things because she enjoys them, or as part of a plan to obtain something she wants. Unlike her chaotic counterparts, however, she doesn't feel the need to wreak destruction for its own sake, if only because she realises that the facade of civilization can shield her from the vengeance of her victims.

CE: "I'll tear it down. I'll tear it all down! Nobody tells me what to do!" The character feels he should be free to do whatever he wants, no matter the cost to others. If he wants something (or someone), he simply takes it (or them) and doesn't hesitate to kill those who try to stop him. Unlike a neutral evil character, he is not willing even to pretend to live by the rules others seek to impose. Law and community are intolerable to him, and he does whatever he can to undermine them. Any chaotic character who is willing to kill innocents (rather than merely steal from them) is chaotic evil, even if he might see himself as a heroic freedom-fighter.

EDIT: I should also point out that, for me, alignment is primarily a quick and dirty method of giving NPCs a set of basic goals/values, rather than something to straitjacket how PCs are roleplayed. For PCs, their goals and overall worldview are distant secondaries to their personality and the adventure thay find themselves in. For NPCs, though, I've found as a DM that it's really useful to just glance at that little two-letter code and think, "OK, how would this NPC react to what's just happened, what would he/she do in response, and how will that affect the next interaction with the PCs?" It's much easier than having to read through several paragraphs of biographical information to figure out a plausible answer, and gives just as good a result. Nobody really cares that much about the specifics of an NPC's personality. What matters is that they operate as if they have a consistent world-view and a consistent set of goals.
"There's an old saying that all it takes for evil to triumph is that good people do nothing. I've always had a problem with that. If you do nothing to oppose evil, then how are you 'good'? To turn aside and allow evil to flourish is to collaborate with it. You ask for mercy. You claim you have done nothing. That 'nothing' is why you deserve no mercy." - Lorian Karthfaerr, drow paladin of Avandra Robin Laws says I'm a Storyteller:
Show
You're more inclined toward the role playing side of the equation and less interested in numbers or experience points. You're quick to compromise if you can help move the story forward, and get bored when the game slows down for a long planning session. You want to play out a story that moves like it's orchestrated by a skilled novelist or film director. Storyteller 92% Tactician 83% Method Actor 75% Butt-Kicker 67% Power Gamer 67% Specialist 58% Casual Gamer 8%
You can´t avoid the possible future powers with "allegiance" key. 

The aligment key showed you divine spells like samples of the holy sacred gift by D&D deities to divine spellcaster, or evil dark arts. Some powers were too cruel and painful to be used by good characters, or only they can be casted by enoughly pure believer.

And lots of spell were created specifically to hurts monsters with aligment like outsiders.  

Without aligment key the subtype aligment for monsters like outsiders woudn´t be necessary any more. 

I don't have an issue with certain origion keywords.  Turn undead, for example, is perfectly fine.  Something vs fey, deomons, angles, natural, or even more specific things like dragons or kobolds, is also perfectly reasonable.

But you shouldn't be able to tell which of the twins is the evil twin by hitting them both with your sword and seeing which takes more damage.  (you have to tell by the goatee  ).

guides
List of no-action attacks.
Dynamic vs Static Bonuses
Phalanx tactics and builds
Crivens! A Pictsies Guide Good
Power
s to intentionally miss with
Mr. Cellophane: How to be unnoticed
Way's to fire around corners
Crits: what their really worth
Retroactive bonus vs Static bonus.
Runepriest handbook & discussion thread
Holy Symbols to hang around your neck
Ways to Gain or Downgrade Actions
List of bonuses to saving throws
The Ghost with the Most (revenant handbook)
my builds
F-111 Interdictor Long (200+ squares) distance ally teleporter. With some warlord stuff. Broken in a plot way, not a power way.

Thought Switch Higher level build that grants upto 14 attacks on turn 1. If your allies play along, it's broken.

Elven Critters Crit op with crit generation. 5 of these will end anything. Broken.

King Fisher Optimized net user.  Moderate.

Boominator Fun catch-22 booming blade build with either strong or completely broken damage depending on your reading.

Very Distracting Warlock Lot's of dazing and major penalties to hit. Overpowered.

Pocket Protector Pixie Stealth Knight. Maximizing the defender's aura by being in an ally's/enemy's square.

Yakuza NinjIntimiAdin: Perma-stealth Striker that offers a little protection for ally's, and can intimidate bloodied enemies. Very Strong.

Chargeburgler with cheese Ranged attacks at the end of a charge along with perma-stealth. Solid, could be overpowered if tweaked.

Void Defender Defends giving a penalty to hit anyone but him, then removing himself from play. Can get somewhat broken in epic.

Scry and Die Attacking from around corners, while staying hidden. Moderate to broken, depending on the situation.

Skimisher Fly in, attack, and fly away. Also prevents enemies from coming close. Moderate to Broken depending on the enemy, but shouldn't make the game un-fun, as the rest of your team is at risk, and you have enough weaknesses.

Indestructible Simply won't die, even if you sleep though combat.  One of THE most abusive character in 4e.

Sir Robin (Bravely Charge Away) He automatically slows and pushes an enemy (5 squares), while charging away. Hard to rate it's power level, since it's terrain dependent.

Death's Gatekeeper A fun twist on a healic, making your party "unkillable". Overpowered to Broken, but shouldn't actually make the game un-fun, just TPK proof.

Death's Gatekeeper mk2, (Stealth Edition) Make your party "unkillable", and you hidden, while doing solid damage. Stronger then the above, but also easier for a DM to shut down. Broken, until your DM get's enough of it.

Domination and Death Dominate everything then kill them quickly. Only works @ 30, but is broken multiple ways.

Battlemind Mc Prone-Daze Protecting your allies by keeping enemies away. Quite powerful.

The Retaliator Getting hit deals more damage to the enemy then you receive yourself, and you can take plenty of hits. Heavy item dependency, Broken.

Dead Kobold Transit Teleports 98 squares a turn, and can bring someone along for the ride. Not fully built, so i can't judge the power.

Psilent Guardian Protect your allies, while being invisible. Overpowered, possibly broken.

Rune of Vengance Do lot's of damage while boosting your teams. Strong to slightly overpowered.

Charedent BarrageA charging ardent. Fine in a normal team, overpowered if there are 2 together, and easily broken in teams of 5.

Super Knight A tough, sticky, high damage knight. Strong.

Super Duper Knight Basically the same as super knight with items, making it far more broken.

Mora, the unkillable avenger Solid damage, while being neigh indestuctable. Overpowered, but not broken.

Swordburst Maximus At-Will Close Burst 3 that slide and prones. Protects allies with off actions. Strong, possibly over powered with the right party.

Examples of spells with allegiance key.

Sacred grove where druids have put a magic proteccion. The intruders without Nature allegiance can´t go there.

The evil altar of sacrifices is cursed. Only true believers with allegiance to that deity will not suffer a penalty to saves and bonus attacks.

To find the criminal the divine spellcaster could create a blessed cup by a ritual. If somebody has commited a blodd crime and he drinks that cup the water will cause a allergy reaction and he will vomit.

"Say me what you're showing off for, and I'll say you what you lack!" (Spanish saying)

 

Book 13 Anaclet 23 Confucius said: "The Superior Man is in harmony but does not follow the crowd. The inferior man follows the crowd, but is not in harmony"

 

"In a country well governed, poverty is something to be ashamed of. In a country badly governed, wealth is something to be ashamed of." - Confucius 

I could see a circle/alter that's attuned to certain people, and animals sure.  Worshiping a god is a bit more iffy, but presumably there's some cerimony for initiates that binds them.

But just having the keyword, or just saying "hail lolth" shouldn't get you in.

To find the criminal the divine spellcaster could create a blessed cup by a ritual. If somebody has commited a blodd crime and he drinks that cup the water will cause a allergy reaction and he will vomit.

Stongly disagree with this one.  
Is stepping on an ant a blood crime?
Or perhaps a butcher killed a pig, would that be a blood crime?
Or an executioner who killed a criminal, how about that?
Is a king, who ordered the execution guilty?
Is a general who sent men to die guilty?
A soldier who fought for his home?
A starving man who stole some bread and then killed the guy who was chasing him?
A baker who killed a thief?
A gladiator forced to fight to the death?
What if you cut down a tree?
What if it was a magic tree, one that had blood?
What if it was a ent?

guides
List of no-action attacks.
Dynamic vs Static Bonuses
Phalanx tactics and builds
Crivens! A Pictsies Guide Good
Power
s to intentionally miss with
Mr. Cellophane: How to be unnoticed
Way's to fire around corners
Crits: what their really worth
Retroactive bonus vs Static bonus.
Runepriest handbook & discussion thread
Holy Symbols to hang around your neck
Ways to Gain or Downgrade Actions
List of bonuses to saving throws
The Ghost with the Most (revenant handbook)
my builds
F-111 Interdictor Long (200+ squares) distance ally teleporter. With some warlord stuff. Broken in a plot way, not a power way.

Thought Switch Higher level build that grants upto 14 attacks on turn 1. If your allies play along, it's broken.

Elven Critters Crit op with crit generation. 5 of these will end anything. Broken.

King Fisher Optimized net user.  Moderate.

Boominator Fun catch-22 booming blade build with either strong or completely broken damage depending on your reading.

Very Distracting Warlock Lot's of dazing and major penalties to hit. Overpowered.

Pocket Protector Pixie Stealth Knight. Maximizing the defender's aura by being in an ally's/enemy's square.

Yakuza NinjIntimiAdin: Perma-stealth Striker that offers a little protection for ally's, and can intimidate bloodied enemies. Very Strong.

Chargeburgler with cheese Ranged attacks at the end of a charge along with perma-stealth. Solid, could be overpowered if tweaked.

Void Defender Defends giving a penalty to hit anyone but him, then removing himself from play. Can get somewhat broken in epic.

Scry and Die Attacking from around corners, while staying hidden. Moderate to broken, depending on the situation.

Skimisher Fly in, attack, and fly away. Also prevents enemies from coming close. Moderate to Broken depending on the enemy, but shouldn't make the game un-fun, as the rest of your team is at risk, and you have enough weaknesses.

Indestructible Simply won't die, even if you sleep though combat.  One of THE most abusive character in 4e.

Sir Robin (Bravely Charge Away) He automatically slows and pushes an enemy (5 squares), while charging away. Hard to rate it's power level, since it's terrain dependent.

Death's Gatekeeper A fun twist on a healic, making your party "unkillable". Overpowered to Broken, but shouldn't actually make the game un-fun, just TPK proof.

Death's Gatekeeper mk2, (Stealth Edition) Make your party "unkillable", and you hidden, while doing solid damage. Stronger then the above, but also easier for a DM to shut down. Broken, until your DM get's enough of it.

Domination and Death Dominate everything then kill them quickly. Only works @ 30, but is broken multiple ways.

Battlemind Mc Prone-Daze Protecting your allies by keeping enemies away. Quite powerful.

The Retaliator Getting hit deals more damage to the enemy then you receive yourself, and you can take plenty of hits. Heavy item dependency, Broken.

Dead Kobold Transit Teleports 98 squares a turn, and can bring someone along for the ride. Not fully built, so i can't judge the power.

Psilent Guardian Protect your allies, while being invisible. Overpowered, possibly broken.

Rune of Vengance Do lot's of damage while boosting your teams. Strong to slightly overpowered.

Charedent BarrageA charging ardent. Fine in a normal team, overpowered if there are 2 together, and easily broken in teams of 5.

Super Knight A tough, sticky, high damage knight. Strong.

Super Duper Knight Basically the same as super knight with items, making it far more broken.

Mora, the unkillable avenger Solid damage, while being neigh indestuctable. Overpowered, but not broken.

Swordburst Maximus At-Will Close Burst 3 that slide and prones. Protects allies with off actions. Strong, possibly over powered with the right party.

* Blood crime would hurting, doing  irrebersible personal damages to a sentient being (but legitime defense or a just reason). Killing a giant ant only for cruel fun is bad, but it´s not a blood crime, it isn´t enough severe or serious.

Executioner doing his work isn´t blood crime but precisely all the opposite, imposing the law because a judge has ordered it. 


* If woodcutter didn´t know it was a ent, he could be judged by involutary manslaughter. Negligence and mistakes can be offense but be done by no-evil people without bad intentions.

Rebember outlaw characters can be chaotic good.

"Say me what you're showing off for, and I'll say you what you lack!" (Spanish saying)

 

Book 13 Anaclet 23 Confucius said: "The Superior Man is in harmony but does not follow the crowd. The inferior man follows the crowd, but is not in harmony"

 

"In a country well governed, poverty is something to be ashamed of. In a country badly governed, wealth is something to be ashamed of." - Confucius 

* Blood crime would hurting, doing  irrebersible personal damages to a sentient being (but legitime defense or a just reason). Killing a giant ant only for cruel fun is bad, but it´s not a blood crime, it isn´t enough severe or serious.

Executioner doing his work isn´t blood crime but precisely all the opposite, imposing the law because a judge has ordered it. 


* If woodcutter didn´t know it was a ent, he could be judged by involutary manslaughter. Negligence and mistakes can be offense but be done by no-evil people without bad intentions.

Rebember outlaw characters can be chaotic good.

Even if it was a sentient ant?
What about partial sentient things, like a dog?
And what if the executioner framed the person, so he could leagaly cut his head off?

And how can magic tell the difference?

guides
List of no-action attacks.
Dynamic vs Static Bonuses
Phalanx tactics and builds
Crivens! A Pictsies Guide Good
Power
s to intentionally miss with
Mr. Cellophane: How to be unnoticed
Way's to fire around corners
Crits: what their really worth
Retroactive bonus vs Static bonus.
Runepriest handbook & discussion thread
Holy Symbols to hang around your neck
Ways to Gain or Downgrade Actions
List of bonuses to saving throws
The Ghost with the Most (revenant handbook)
my builds
F-111 Interdictor Long (200+ squares) distance ally teleporter. With some warlord stuff. Broken in a plot way, not a power way.

Thought Switch Higher level build that grants upto 14 attacks on turn 1. If your allies play along, it's broken.

Elven Critters Crit op with crit generation. 5 of these will end anything. Broken.

King Fisher Optimized net user.  Moderate.

Boominator Fun catch-22 booming blade build with either strong or completely broken damage depending on your reading.

Very Distracting Warlock Lot's of dazing and major penalties to hit. Overpowered.

Pocket Protector Pixie Stealth Knight. Maximizing the defender's aura by being in an ally's/enemy's square.

Yakuza NinjIntimiAdin: Perma-stealth Striker that offers a little protection for ally's, and can intimidate bloodied enemies. Very Strong.

Chargeburgler with cheese Ranged attacks at the end of a charge along with perma-stealth. Solid, could be overpowered if tweaked.

Void Defender Defends giving a penalty to hit anyone but him, then removing himself from play. Can get somewhat broken in epic.

Scry and Die Attacking from around corners, while staying hidden. Moderate to broken, depending on the situation.

Skimisher Fly in, attack, and fly away. Also prevents enemies from coming close. Moderate to Broken depending on the enemy, but shouldn't make the game un-fun, as the rest of your team is at risk, and you have enough weaknesses.

Indestructible Simply won't die, even if you sleep though combat.  One of THE most abusive character in 4e.

Sir Robin (Bravely Charge Away) He automatically slows and pushes an enemy (5 squares), while charging away. Hard to rate it's power level, since it's terrain dependent.

Death's Gatekeeper A fun twist on a healic, making your party "unkillable". Overpowered to Broken, but shouldn't actually make the game un-fun, just TPK proof.

Death's Gatekeeper mk2, (Stealth Edition) Make your party "unkillable", and you hidden, while doing solid damage. Stronger then the above, but also easier for a DM to shut down. Broken, until your DM get's enough of it.

Domination and Death Dominate everything then kill them quickly. Only works @ 30, but is broken multiple ways.

Battlemind Mc Prone-Daze Protecting your allies by keeping enemies away. Quite powerful.

The Retaliator Getting hit deals more damage to the enemy then you receive yourself, and you can take plenty of hits. Heavy item dependency, Broken.

Dead Kobold Transit Teleports 98 squares a turn, and can bring someone along for the ride. Not fully built, so i can't judge the power.

Psilent Guardian Protect your allies, while being invisible. Overpowered, possibly broken.

Rune of Vengance Do lot's of damage while boosting your teams. Strong to slightly overpowered.

Charedent BarrageA charging ardent. Fine in a normal team, overpowered if there are 2 together, and easily broken in teams of 5.

Super Knight A tough, sticky, high damage knight. Strong.

Super Duper Knight Basically the same as super knight with items, making it far more broken.

Mora, the unkillable avenger Solid damage, while being neigh indestuctable. Overpowered, but not broken.

Swordburst Maximus At-Will Close Burst 3 that slide and prones. Protects allies with off actions. Strong, possibly over powered with the right party.

Alignment should be a module.  That's the only way to prevent them from sneaking alignment-based mechanics into the core.
If you know it´s a no-hostile sentient being like formians (Lawuld ant-like outsiders), is a injustice and a blood crime.

Hurting cruelly animals if it´s not necesarry (food, hunting, fishing or legitime defense) is bad, evil, but not a true blood crime. It should be punished but not like a murder.

"Say me what you're showing off for, and I'll say you what you lack!" (Spanish saying)

 

Book 13 Anaclet 23 Confucius said: "The Superior Man is in harmony but does not follow the crowd. The inferior man follows the crowd, but is not in harmony"

 

"In a country well governed, poverty is something to be ashamed of. In a country badly governed, wealth is something to be ashamed of." - Confucius 

I don't mind aligments but I do hope they will have little or no interaction with game mechanics.



I don't mind alignment either.  The best thing about 4e alignment scheme; no game mechanics.  I second that approach.  Otherwise I remain unconcerned how they or anyone define or arrange an alignment scheme.  Without the game mechanics, people can use what ever alignment scheme works for them.  I am fan of using alignment scheme, but I am not everyone.  If I were to take a pole, I would vote for a return to the traditional nine, only because of tradition. 
So long as "always" and "must be" are taken out back and shot, alignment is completely harmless.
It's the dependencies that gave alignment its terrible reputation.  Get rid of those.
I've always liked alignments as a character guideline.  It gives the player and the DM a reference point for where a character started, in a sense, his original underlying moral compass.  That being said, I always felt that one could move on either axis as a result of circumstances and given significant reason.  After all, people do change and characters should be allowed to evolve as well.  As a DM, I am more interested in a character beign "good" or "evil" than "lawful" or "chatoic".  I think the restriction of a paladin to LG is more about a paladin sticking to the laws and codes of his or her order and respecting the overall laws of the land.  In this sense, it is a handy tool.  I would encourage any character who belongs to an order to know what the rules of that order are for role-playing purposes.  Sure, this may require more work on the DM and player's part if they aren't outlined already elsewhere, but it gives solid guidelines for their future actions and makes it easier to determine whether the paladin ever acts in a way which would cause him or her to lose her paladin abilities.  
I think the restriction of a paladin to LG is more about a paladin sticking to the laws and codes of his or her order and respecting the overall laws of the land.

But, removing the alignment locks doesn't suddenly mean you can't be a LG paladin, but that everyone else can play whatever aligned pally they would want.
Now, all we need is an impassioned argument that Lawfulness (and possibly Goodness) is somehow an essential dependency of Paladinness, and we've successfully recreated every alignment thread ever.
So some people in this thread seem to dislike alignment a lot. But I feel that they're really not arguing their point. Why is alignment nostalgia? Why should it be sent to another planet, really?

D&D is a fantasy game. In a majority of all fantasy stories, there are bad guys and good guys. In LOTR for example, we have the master bad guy Sauron. If you feel a lot of ambivalence about wether Sauron is evil or not, I suspect you are either a horrible cynic or in need of intense therapy/medication. Or perhaps you are into some strange esoterica that I wouldn't touch with a ten foot pole.

Most RPG players I've met are terrible at role playing. Their "characters" are just themselves on steroids, and they do whatever they want to get what they want. This is boring to me as a DM. Giving their characters an alignment at least gives the players some hints how their characters could act different from themselves.

In gaming, alignment is not nostalgia at all. There are many current games that have systems for "light" and "darkness" points and similar things. And they do have an effect on the character's performance in the game.
Also, one of the best RPGs ever created - Pendragon - has a rules system that can govern almost every aspect of your character's behavior. This may be repulsive to some, but it has created some of the best role playing I've ever seen around any table.
Game mechanic should reward and punish ethical behavior. Clerics and divine spellcasters ought act according to his deities moral values, and some magic items could be more powerful if they are used by a pure soul or heartless. 

"Say me what you're showing off for, and I'll say you what you lack!" (Spanish saying)

 

Book 13 Anaclet 23 Confucius said: "The Superior Man is in harmony but does not follow the crowd. The inferior man follows the crowd, but is not in harmony"

 

"In a country well governed, poverty is something to be ashamed of. In a country badly governed, wealth is something to be ashamed of." - Confucius 

Game mechanic should reward and punish ethical behavior. Clerics and divine spellcasters ought act according to his deities moral values, and some magic items could be more powerful if they are used by a pure soul or heartless. 


Ah...no.

The problem is you are almost never going to find a player and DM with exactly the same idea as to what "Lawful Good" is, for example. Players of classes like pre-4e Paladins can and have fallen for doing something the player is certain is LG behavior, but the DM disagrees and takes away your Paladin class features.
The objective mechanics can stay.  If a DM wants to throw in a Holy/Unholy/Anarchic/Axiomatic +5 aluminum baseball bat just to screw with the two letters written near the top of a character sheet, that's completely hilarious.

The subjective mechanics have got to go.  A Paladin becoming a crappy fighter or a monk forced to multiclass into somthing else because he disagreed with the DM on the exact lawfulness and/or goodness of some damn thing is just going to cause fistfights.
If it is an OBVIOUSLY evil act then there should be some kind of punishment for those bound by certain ethical behavior because of their class. Anything else is up in the air. For instance, a Paladin helping his group steal something from a clueless merchant because it furthers the group's goals is one thing, slaughtering the merchant or letting him be slaghtered by your "friends" is quite another. Something less severe requires some repentance, while the more drastic actions will result in a disconnect from your god. Other classes, other than paladins and clerics, don't really have this problem, though I've had DMs take characters away that become so evil that they no longer can adventure with the party (due to the party wanting to kill him/her). There's also been the super awesome times when one character is turned evil by some kind of magical item and must play along until the others figure it out. Fun times. I think we're smart enough to understand the way our characters should be behaving...heroically. For some alignment (moral code) is a part of their character. A knight should be gallant and help the down trodden. A priest should be curing the sick. If you're playing on the other side of the fence (evil) then an "evil" paladin is going to protect those he feels need protecting - there are downtrodden orcs in the world same as puny humans. In this way, alignment isn't a hard and fast rule, simply a guideline that some will like and some won't. I do think there should be some magical items that can only be wielded by the worthy (Excalibur  anyone?) Doesn't mean some other fool can't pick the damn thing up...it's just going to be an ordinary sword to him. 
Check out my Dungeons and Dragons Blog It's +4 to all awesome rolls.
* A character isn´t good is he doesn´t want help other people selflessly when there isn´t a serious danger or excesive sacrifice. 

I imagine a PnC could have got neutral aligment but good allegiance. He would be a civilian, a lowly countryman hafling too coward to run risks to help the heroes but he likes them and could give some information or advices if there isn´t risk.

A character stop being lawful if he commites a too severe action that can cause public scandal (breaking a solemn promise) or hostility by law authorities.  

Sometimes a character can behave loyalty to his allegiance so that totally opposite to his true aligment.

For example a xenophobe raptoran (from "Races of Wild") who loves his fatherland and  his folks thinks he is LG, a good guy, but when he treats foreigners he behaves like CE, a true bast..a son of b...  son of bad mother..

The aligment should show how character treats everybody, people with different allegiance.

I want say aligment and allegiance are too similar ideas but the way they could  be used totally different, and it could help to do a better roleplaying.

* D&D deities could wish divine magic with allegiance key. For example Lolth to test some drows´ loyalty they must pass a proof with a special magic weapon. That weapon is cursed and if it is taken up by somebody without Lolth allegiance, he will suffer a great pain.   

"Say me what you're showing off for, and I'll say you what you lack!" (Spanish saying)

 

Book 13 Anaclet 23 Confucius said: "The Superior Man is in harmony but does not follow the crowd. The inferior man follows the crowd, but is not in harmony"

 

"In a country well governed, poverty is something to be ashamed of. In a country badly governed, wealth is something to be ashamed of." - Confucius 

If it is an OBVIOUSLY evil act then there should be some kind of punishment for those bound by certain ethical behavior because of their class. 



If there is, it should be secular; the organization that the character belongs to (if any) should levy an appropriate punishment.  No 'you lost your powers, LOL U MAD?' screwjobs.
Another day, another three or four entries to my Ignore List.
Speaking for my self, I have never had any problem with alignments.  Nor has any one I've played with.
I like alignment. It is a tool used to help players role play. 
In a some recent scenarios, I had been faced with some dilemas. My characters could reasonably act both ways. The character faced a moral dilema, but ultimatly acted in accordance with their alignment.

I don't think I have ever played by the books versions of alignments, instead my original DM and I negotiated what the terms meant. We had settled on a two axis system.
Lawful-Chaotic was your view on the law. Lawful believed in the rule of law, Chaotic did not.
Good-Evil seems pretty obvious as to the intent (but of course interrpretation of what constitutes good and evil is less obvious).

What I hate is paladins walking around detecting evil all day.
I started playing D&D in the 80's. I've played D&D, 1e, 2e, and 3.xe (and many other RPGs). I also played Magic since it came out (except for a few years around the change of the millennium. I say this so you know a bit of my experience, not because I care about editions.
Speaking for my self, I have never had any problem with alignments.  Nor has any one I've played with.


Same here.

Azzy’s Trivial Trivia, A Blog

 

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Game mechanic should reward and punish ethical behavior. Clerics and divine spellcasters ought act according to his deities moral values, and some magic items could be more powerful if they are used by a pure soul or heartless. 


Ah...no.

The problem is you are almost never going to find a player and DM with exactly the same idea as to what "Lawful Good" is, for example. Players of classes like pre-4e Paladins can and have fallen for doing something the player is certain is LG behavior, but the DM disagrees and takes away your Paladin class features.



And sometimes, a player will argue that his Paladin remains LG while torturing a troll, because the troll can just regenerate hit points.  I have no problem with players and Dms disagreeing on what is proper LG Paladin behavior.  That is an issue a Dm and player can sit at a table work out.  It  happens at game tables all the time.  How a Pc behaves is a role playing decision and should have role playing consequences.  What those role playing consequences are, should be decided by the Dm and players participating in that campaign, not the game mechanics.  Rewards and punishment for Pc behavior built into the game mechanics takes that decision away from the players and dms.
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What I hate is paladins walking around detecting evil all day.



I used a paladins @-will detect evil as an invisibility detector, secret door, hidden chamber and treasure finder.  That **** happens with an experienced player and inexperienced Dm.