Hex vs. Sacking...

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So an interresting debate came up last night. Someone played Hex (when there were only six creatures in play) and in response, prior to the spell tacking effect, someone sacrificed a creature. We got into a debate over how the spell would work if it worked. Finally after much arguing we decided that even though there were no longer six creatures on the board the spell wouldn't fizzle and the remaining creatures were destroyed.


Was this the right decission?
I am Red/White

Hex will resolve, destroying all the targets which are still legal.
608.2b If the spell or ability specifies targets, it checks whether the targets are still legal. A target that's no longer in the zone it was in when it was targeted is illegal. Other changes to the game state may cause a target to no longer be legal; for example, its characteristics may have changed or an effect may have changed the text of the spell. If the source of an ability has left the zone it was in, its last known information is used during this process. The spell or ability is countered if all its targets, for every instance of the word "target," are now illegal. If the spell or ability is not countered, it will resolve normally. However, if any of its targets are illegal, the part of the spell or ability's effect for which it is an illegal target can't perform any actions on that target or make that target perform any actions. The effect may still determine information about illegal targets, though, and other parts of the effect for which those targets are not illegal may still affect them.

 
a spell only fizzles if ALL its targets are illegal
Hex will simply destroy the remaining 5 creatures
proud member of the 2011 community team
Hex will resolve, destroying all the targets which are still legal.
608.2b If the spell or ability specifies targets, it checks whether the targets are still legal. A target that's no longer in the zone it was in when it was targeted is illegal. Other changes to the game state may cause a target to no longer be legal; for example, its characteristics may have changed or an effect may have changed the text of the spell. If the source of an ability has left the zone it was in, its last known information is used during this process. The spell or ability is countered if all its targets, for every instance of the word "target," are now illegal. If the spell or ability is not countered, it will resolve normally. However, if any of its targets are illegal, the part of the spell or ability's effect for which it is an illegal target can't perform any actions on that target or make that target perform any actions. The effect may still determine information about illegal targets, though, and other parts of the effect for which those targets are not illegal may still affect them.

 



Ok. Thank you. And again... just for clarity's sake, and future referance for my group...

You are saying that someone cannot sacrifice a creature in response to someone casting a spell, prior to it coming into play, so that the spell cannot be cast, according to 608.2b. Correct?
I am Red/White

You are saying that someone cannot sacrifice a creature in response to someone casting a spell, prior to it coming into play, so that the spell cannot be cast, according to 608.2b. Correct?

By the time you can respond to a spell, that spells targets have been chosen, its cost has been paid, etc. You cannot intervene in this process.

You are saying that someone cannot sacrifice a creature in response to someone casting a spell, prior to it coming into play, so that the spell cannot be cast, according to 608.2b. Correct?

By the time you can respond to a spell, that spells targets have been chosen, its cost has been paid, etc. You cannot intervene in this process.




Thank you gentlemen! ;)
I am Red/White

No, that's not what's being said in the slightest. Hex is a perfectly normal spell and can be responded to. In fact, far from somehow implying otherwise, the above answer wouldn't make any sense if you couldn't do this! And, there are no special timing rules about sacrificing things. When it's a cost, it works like any other cost, and when it's an effect, it works like any other effect.

(Also, Instants and Sorceries do not "come into play", i.e. enter the battlefield, under any circumstances, ever.)

When you cast Hex, you must name exactly six, distinct, legal targets. However, if when Hex resolves, some but not all of those targets are still there and still legal, it simply destroys the legal targets and ignores the others. Those are two different times, though, and it's perfectly possible to cast spells or activate abilities between them.
Jeff Heikkinen DCI Rules Advisor since Dec 25, 2011
Here's how it might have played out, in more detail than you might be looking for:

Player A: I cast Hex targeting Brindle Boar and your five Primeval Titans.
Hex is put on the stack.
Player B: In response, I sacrifice Brindle Boar to gain 4 life.
Brindle Boar is moved to the graveyard.
Brindle Boar's ability is put on the stack.
Player B gets priority now, but he doesn't normally explicity pass.
Player A: Ok.
This indicates that Player A passed priority.
Brindle Boar's ability resolves and Player B gains 4 life.
Players get priority again, but they'll need to speak up if they aren't just passing.
Hex resolves. It still has five legal targets, and it destroys them all.

I hope that you find that explanation valuable.

Edit: Fixed something about who gets priority when.
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