Help me create The Weeping Angels as a Monster/Encounter design help

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So I have a 4 man 4th level group: Human Seeker, Human Warlord, Human Fighter, Human CHA paladin. They are about to enter a tomb looking for the Shielf of Halav (I am modding up an old 2E mod with CD enhancement).

In one room they are going to find the the Angels. Here is my idea of how I want them to function.

I am using the Dark Sun Human Gladiator as the base stats. However I am adding a few abilities.

While seen, illuminated by torches and such the monster is Petrified, they can only use thier minor action power.

When the party cannot see (due to the torches being put out...see below) the angels have their full compliment of actions and deal an extra d6 dmg.

The angels also have this power.

Minor action (Burst 20) +10 vs. Reflex (should this be higher or target a different stat?).  One light source in burst is extinguised.

My idea for the encounter is to either force the group to use held actions and attack the darkness (where they can actully hurt the creatures). The other option is attacking the petrified statues and dealing weak damage.

I like the idea of the angels, but feel this encounter would be an easy and boring encounter. If the party have touches they can just spam the statues in the light with no real threat. Why not combine the states with some other monsters. The party may not even know they are monsters to start with. Also the big thing with the angels is DON'T BLINK. I feel you need to add this ability. Maybe a teleport at random points that move the statues closer.

Also the statues are legendary scary so start to tell the party about them via npc's or old books etc, so the party are worried about very statue they see.
I may even nick this idea!
Statue form: +10 all defences, resist 20 all damage, regen 10.

Dim light, statues can shift 1, and extinguish or dim 1 light source.

Full darkness
Free action to switch from statue to animated form.
Minor action: Drow darkness power.
Move action: teleport 10 or move 20. Hover.
Damage: something massive, and drain a surge.
Crit: teleport target back in time.
When they have combat advantage (like they can't be seen), crit range expands to 15-20.
OR
Hit = damage + condition (save ends). First Fail: target immobilized (fear). 2nd Fail: sent back in time 50 years before birth.
Statue form: +10 all defences, resist 20 all damage, regen 10.

Dim light, statues can shift 1, and extinguish or dim 1 light source.

Full darkness
Free action to switch from statue to animated form.
Minor action: Drow darkness power.
Move action: teleport 10 or move 20. Hover.
Damage: something massive, and drain a surge.
Crit: teleport target back in time.
When they have combat advantage (like they can't be seen), crit range expands to 15-20.
OR
Hit = damage + condition (save ends). First Fail: target immobilized (fear). 2nd Fail: sent back in time 50 years before birth.


This is fourth level.  How many characters will have a way to battle things that are 15 feet up?  Or deal with complete darkness.  Or the hp to deal with 5 times as many crits?
Thanks for the suggestion Crazy. I do see how that can be boring. These are old school players who are new to D&D so I am not going to be as harsh as suggested by Whisper, but I do want it to be a challenge.

I also want to tax their economy of actions. First up, there are no such thing as Sunrods in this world. To light a torch I am making it a standard action or Thievery DC 20 as a minor action. I am hoping ot make them think about going into the defensive with their actions while I spring the trap. I would like there to be a turn of WTF before they figure out how to shut them down.
To me, the most intriguiing thing about the angels was that they fed on people's potential and sent them back in time rather than killing them. A monster like this could make for an awesome quest.

If you are looking to just mimic the monster, I agree that simulating the "don't blink" aspect would be cool. Be ready to fiat some sort ofome sort of will check to not blink with the eventual  penalty for too many rounds of no blinking, once the players figure the monster out. I agree that, in order for it to really sing you might need other monsters to subtly establish that the characters aren't"facing" the angels. They basically operate like Boo form MArio afterall.
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Part of the trick here is that the Weeping Angels work because they are scary, but, unfortunately, dice rolls are not scary.

What is scary is what you can suggest in the players' imaginations... it's narrative storytelling, and just enough suggestion to open the doors a crack just enough to let the imagination fill in the blanks.

The party opens pushes open the door to a darkened room, and sees crumpled bodies on the foors. 

As the party explores the room and looks around for clues, describe these details...

The room contains lots of strange, old stone architecture... go into details about the weird geometries and disturbing angles... the twisted shapes of crumbling columns and benches, the abnormal form of the old stone fountain, the strange subterranean vines and fungi growing on everything... the tormented statues...

For the bodies, these would have been a different group of adventures, and perhaps a couple of intelligent humanoid monsters.  Apply a healthy dose of "body horror" to them:  remove a touch of humanity from the victims in some disturbing way.  Twist their limbs around, have wide eyes starting out in horror, their mouths somehow vanished, leaving only smooth skin behind.

One of the bodies, emaciated, its white, bloodless face stricken with horror, did not die like the others.  One cold hand is desperately clutching a faint, crystalline lightsource, its finger and a sharp edge of the light source are caked in dried blood... the other hand is at the end of a wrist torn open with the edge of the crystal... the body is laying in a dried puddle of its own blood.  Near the body, smeared on the wall, by the victim in his own blood, are the words: DON'T BLINK

Now, have everyone roll the dice... this is nominally a spot check, but the results don't matter:  whatever they roll, the party notices that, when they weren't looking, the statues have definitely moved....

Go as far as the party will let you with describing how the statues shift position a little bit more with every blink... and then, their torches are magically extinguished, leaving them in near darkess until their eyes adjust to the gloom lit only by the glowing crystal, and the statues are now mere inches away!

After that, it will almost certainly be a combat encounter, and whatever happens there won't matter much.  I'd just use an appropriate generic monster, such as a gargoyle, for stats, and let the combat play out normally from there.  If a PC is so unfortunate as to fall in battle, just apply the body-horror effect instead of death... the living PC victim has no mouth and broken limbs... (the broken limbs will heal, that creepy thing with the mouth seems like a good subject for a tough quest later to restore the PC to normal....)

The players probably won't remember the combat for its horror - there's nothing particularly scary about dice-rolling, but I suspect they will remember the imagery....
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I'd say most of their moves are immediate actions or interrupts.  The only non immediate is an attempt to harness energy or deflect it...  In the most common (and scary) case, lights!  They should also have a high speed, since one moment of blinking or darkness can result in them cornering you!  (Just ask Bishop in Time of Angels/Flesh and Stone)  Their attacks range (due to the sudden retcon in the 5th season) from grabbing and strangling you to sending you to another point in time, these can be easily done as attacks, probably reactions to "blinking" (failing a skill roll/mini challenge) to the lights going out.  Also, one important thing to remember... the image of an angel BECOMES an angel!  So, if someone hangs up a poster warning about the weeping angels in the tavern... that tavern has a weeping angel in it!  As for sending you to a different time, this one might be interesting. You could do something like in Blink!  Or maybe send them to the future?  For statistics, the angels are no push overs.  Perhaps make them look weak, but in reality these guys are probably epic level.  They've killed countless races and are the "deadliest assassins in the universe" after all.

Crazed undead horror posing as a noble and heroic forum poster!

 

 

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