Idea for Clerical Healing

Make it reaction-based. This has a couple positive effects:

1) It gives it an edge over healing potions because it can be done immediately. Your ally goes down and you immediately draw on the power of your god and bring him back into the fray. No bag of healing potions is going to do that.

2) It keeps healing in the action economy without eating up the primary action, so the cleric can still fight, cast spells, and do other things but there is a cost (it uses up the reaction).
But it requires no thinking from the player.
The Pelor Cleric has nothing to do with his reactions, so he loses nothing, only gains actions, that he doesn't need to use for healing on his turns.

But your idea simplifies it even more, so far that I'm tempted to say "dumb down".

IMAGE(http://www.wizards.com/magic/images/whatcolor_iswhite.jpg)

Make it reaction-based. This has a couple positive effects:

1) It gives it an edge over healing potions because it can be done immediately. Your ally goes down and you immediately draw on the power of your god and bring him back into the fray. No bag of healing potions is going to do that.

2) It keeps healing in the action economy without eating up the primary action, so the cleric can still fight, cast spells, and do other things but there is a cost (it uses up the reaction).



Same method occurred to me while reading the Playtest Report. If the Cleric spends a reaction, it shows some amount of exertion by the Cleric who is focusing on spirituality, but it doesnt interfere with the action during the turn of the Cleric. It also allows the recipient to heal immediately, as soon as taking the damage of a discouraging bruise or a physical injury.

Alternatively, the RECIPIENT of the healing, the healee, is the one who spends the reaction. Not the Cleric. Then each person cant heal more than once per turn, and it represents the effort of the healee, such as striving to put faith in the Clerics spiritual tradition into action.
I think any 'magical' healing, be it spell, divine power, or whatever, should take up the cleric's full action for that turn. Why should he/she get to use such a powerful ability AND still be able to cast a spell or make an attack? Healing should not be something that can be done almost instantly.
"Death smiles at us all. All a man can do is smile back."
What needs to change is not the way cleric healing and action economy works, but rather the attitude of players.  If they expect a healbot, the cleric will feel pressure to be a healbot--no possible mechanical fix will change that.
If the cleric is to get to heal and do something else in a round then it's time to take away their heavy armor and weapons. Just make them another wizard class that casts cure spells and get it over with. 


My take on the cleric is that they are given the ability to enter combat with very good protection and hard hitting weapons to off set the fact that they can only really use their spells for healing and revitalizing the party.

As long as D&D is going to make all of the classes be melee juggernaugts and pander to the my character sucks if I can't be as good as the other guy then it's really a game I don't want to have anything to do with.

It's a pity too since it really had something special going on for such a long time.

It seems the developers are destined to make the kind of game I don't want to play. As it stands each new discussion that is opened proves more and more that game is going to be a mish mash of 3e and 4e, two versions of the game I don't particularly care for in the least. There is a glimmer of promise in the description but the details tell the real story.

If I don't buy into it, then my group is likely to be very happy to play pathfinder and not worry about what WotC is doing. Wizards of the coast has already wrecked D&D for us and we've long since made our farewells. I have six people who I play with regularly. That's six players and a DM who aren't and won't be spending money on D&D branded products.


You see, the real problem with the way things work right now is the over saturation of hit points. If they design the game with the least number of hit points a character needs to survive as the base and stop adding six tons of damage bonuses to them, then a dart that does 1-3 hitpoints of damage will become a viable weapon again. If a dagger does a d4 damge but everyone has fifty hitpoints then the dagger is a useless weapon. if a character has fifty hit points at first level but the healer can only heal a quarter of that for one person before they are unable to lend healing support then the game is broken from the start. The core of the game needs to have flatter numbers through out. They can always add hit points and a more robust healing package to the game in one of their modules.

As long as players demand their precious characters are death proof at low levels and the rest of the game plays as if they aren't then it will always have healing issues. Giving the cleric more healing for free is nothing more than that obnoxious healing surge bullarky rearing it's ugly head once more.

Until this issue is resolved there is going to be an issue with the healer and it's role in the party.

The cleric should either lose it's healing capability all together and bacome another fighter or wizzard, or lose the offensive portion of their design. If the primary reason for a cleric to exist is to heal then give it healing and get rid of it's exellent combat spells and weapons. They can keep their armor as they will need it to help those in the front who are dying. 

Those who play clerics shouldn't get their cake and be able to eat it too.
If the cleric is to get to heal and do something else in a round then it's time to take away their heavy armor and weapons. Just make them another wizard class that casts cure spells and get it over with.

Better yet, let the Wizard prepare heal spells.

If the cleric is to get to heal and do something else in a round then it's time to take away their heavy armor and weapons. Just make them another wizard class that casts cure spells and get it over with.

Better yet, let the Wizard prepare heal spells.




Wow, I was actually just having a conversation about this!
I like the idea myself, someone so versed in the workings of magic can't even mend a wound? There has to be some way for those silly charts and mutterings to heal a cut. 
But then we would lose the distinction between the classes...

I'm going to add the Cure spells to the wizard spell list in my 3.5 campaign, probably at a spell level higher than they are in the clerics by 1 lvl. However, it makes sense in my setting since arcane magic is so well explored.
So, I'm on the fence about this for Next.

You are Red/Blue!
You are Red/Blue!
If the cleric is to get to heal and do something else in a round then it's time to take away their heavy armor and weapons. Just make them another wizard class that casts cure spells and get it over with.

Better yet, let the Wizard prepare heal spells.



Wow, I was actually just having a conversation about this!
I like the idea myself, someone so versed in the workings of magic can't even mend a wound? There has to be some way for those silly charts and mutterings to heal a cut.



Yeah. The Wizard has hundreds of different kinds of spells. All heal is is one single spell. Just prepare it in the slot of the appropriate level. Done.



But then we would lose the distinction between the classes...



If the entire class is defined by a single spell, the class is fail anyway. At most, the ability to use a heal spell is a feat.



Fortunately, the 5e Cleric might be appealing. It seems it will be setting neutral, thus open to whatever flavors the adventure setting offers. Meanwhile the focus on domains (symbols, archetypes), allows a diversity of spiritual concepts. The Sun Cleric has decent “white mage” flavor that I can get into.

But regardless of whether I like the Cleric class or not, I strongly resent if the Cleric has a monopoly over healing.

This is also a roleplay game. No class should ever be a must have. Players should feel free to choose whatever class they want to explore.
Sadly, part of the problem with the Cleric and Healing in general is that we are dealing with one of the biggest and most dreaded of "Sacred Cows" in the game.  The cleric has always been the healing class. To change that would be to deviate from the "core D&D experience", which I personally find a shame.  I think it is time for some of the sacred cows to be slaughtered and fed to new ideas.

First, one thing I appreciated from 4E over all other editions was finally breaking the mold and allowing other classes asside from the Divine Casters to effect healing in the game. I think 5E needs to retain this ideology, if for no other reason than to finally allow certain genres to function within the rules of a D&D game, such as games where "magical healers/clerics" don't realy exist.

The cleric IMHO is a spiritual caster (or for those other old timers... spell beggars). They devote themselves to a life of religion and devout worship of a particular deity/belief structure.  Their overall existance as a class should be that put forth in 4E, mixed with the flavore of 2E.  They are "Leaders" of their flocks and by extension should continue to be leaders among their allies.

The class should be built around how they can use their faith in the views of their deity to further aid their allies, not simply be a healer regardless of what deity they are devoted to. Each clergy is different. They have different goals, different purposes.  For instance, why would a deity of the primal wilderness care about magically healing people? It defies the natural order.

I personally feel that the class focus should, as its Core shtick, give the party some form of inspirational (religion specific) bonuses, not healing.  Healing should (as someone mentioned earlier) be an aspect that is granted only by certain faiths. Healing should simply NOT be the core shtick of the cleric.

For instance the Cleric of Moradin. Mordain (in simplicity) is a deity of artifice/creation and protection. The cleric's abilities should focus on those themes. IMHO, a good offense does not equate to portraying a "defense" oriented ethos. They should not say get major destructive abilities nor should they focus on healing. They should focus on the ability to make their own and their allies' gear stronger/better, create temporary gear (such as Spiritual Hammer [see below] and abilities that aid in protecting their allies. They should NOT be focusing on abilities like 'crusader's strike' or 'divine smite' as these are more fitting of offensive ethos (IMHO). However, the 'Spirutal Hammer' spell  I see more fitting to the Moradin cleric (as you are creating a hammer for use -> creation deity) than to the cleric of a deity of light of healing, Perlor.

Now on the flip side of that, the Cleric of Pelor IS a healer as Pelor is specifically a deity of healing, strength and light. Their abilities should focus on that. For the most part it does, but it could use more focus (see above about Spiritual Hammer).  A cleric of Pelor should be using the power of light and radiance to grant blessings on their allies.

As for "healing" spells, I agree that as a "spell" they should be available to anyone who can cast spells. However, again, we enter "sacred cow" territory where Divine and Arcane spells don't mix or cover the same intellectual space. Another cow that should be made into steak.

JMHO. YMMV.

You see, the real problem with the way things work right now is the over saturation of hit points. If they design the game with the least number of hit points a character needs to survive as the base and stop adding six tons of damage bonuses to them, then a dart that does 1-3 hitpoints of damage will become a viable weapon again. If a dagger does a d4 damge but everyone has fifty hitpoints then the dagger is a useless weapon. if a character has fifty hit points at first level but the healer can only heal a quarter of that for one person before they are unable to lend healing support then the game is broken from the start. The core of the game needs to have flatter numbers through out...

As long as players demand their precious characters are death proof at low levels and the rest of the game plays as if they aren't then it will always have healing issues. Giving the cleric more healing for free is nothing more than that obnoxious healing surge bullarky rearing it's ugly head once more.

Until this issue is resolved there is going to be an issue with the healer and it's role in the party.

The cleric should either lose it's healing capability all together and bacome another fighter or wizzard, or lose the offensive portion of their design.
.



You had me for most of this post.  I like what you said about the flattening of HP to keep weapons, as you say "viable".  But i dont like how that came to the conclusion. 

Clerics are templars.  healers with a sword (well...a mace in D&D).  Thats what they were designed as pretty much.  Healing was largely after fights in Advanced Dungeons and Dragons.  Clerics were perfectly capable in combat.  They just didn't get into it AS much since they occassionally had to save someone. 

Doing both simultaneously is a terrible idea.  I agree there.  But as I think I mentioned elsewhere, the NATURE of a Gawds protection of his/her Servants is quite real in D&D.  We pray for Gawds protection or calm or all kinds of things before battle.  I think healing made as a class feature in some way might make some sense.  Not just as spells but what if the Cleric could spend an Action to pray before a fight, and get a pool of options in return for her tireless obedience to the tenets of the deity.  Perhaps +1 to AC for those of her basic alignment, or DR 1 for her and her companions, girding them for their trials or a +1 to a skill test showing the deities forethought in favoringthat clerics actions.

One thing i would like is if the cleric healing was more like a group healing through prayer, not just singular doses of healing.  So maybe Cure light cures ALL her companions 1D8. 

My favorite solution to date has been the usage of healing pulses by the emission of positive energy from turning attempts.  I like this idea a lot.  it "makes sense" that such positive energy or if you will, reservoirs of divine favor she may draw on exist. 

I dunno.  There's lots of work ahead for the designers.  i am poretty sure they dont know where they will fall on it yet.  But the healer is an important component of D&D.  So I am hoping they really look at this one carefully.  I want a templar type cleric ideal represented, even if there are battle Cleric vs. whatever clerics within that vision. 





I feel heroes who can heal, should heal with the same reach as their primary attack.


A hero who makes a single-target range attack, like an archer, should heal using single-target range, like a ray of healing that can troubleshoot allies in the distance.

A hero who makes a multi-target range attack, like Fireball, should heal using multi-target ranged attacks, like a pillar of light, thus allow allies to persist in establishing control over specific areas of the battlefield.

A hero who makes a single-target melee attack, like a gishy sword-wielding “Templar” War Cleric, should heal using a single-target melee, like touch, laying hands. Thus the War Cleric can jump in to assist an ally, or else heal oneself to better search-and-destroy a specific foe.

A hero who makes a multi-target melee attack, like weapon cleave or Burning Hands, should heal using multi-target melee, like an aura of healing. Thus this Cleric can better safeguard the allies who one is body-guarding.



Healing by means of the same reach as attacking synergizes amazingly well with the character concept and role, and brings interesting diversity to the mechanic of healing.
what in the world are you talking about?
what in the world are you talking about?



Actually, see my sig.
I like khaalis' idea, let's see a cleric's deity actually have a major effect on their spell list. 
Why would a cleric of St. Cuthbert (LN) have the same spell list as a cleric of Kord (CG)?? Makes no sense... Maybe a few similarities, but not the whole list!
A healing pool could be given as a class feature, and wizards should be able to use cure spells.
I like it khaalis. +1.  
You are Red/Blue!
You are Red/Blue!
I think any 'magical' healing, be it spell, divine power, or whatever, should take up the cleric's full action for that turn. Why should he/she get to use such a powerful ability AND still be able to cast a spell or make an attack? Healing should not be something that can be done almost instantly.



Because then clerics become extremely boring to play for 90% or more of gamers out there. Nobody wants to be forced to play a healbot.
I like khaalis' idea, let's see a cleric's deity actually have a major effect on their spell list. 
Why would a cleric of St. Cuthbert (LN) have the same spell list as a cleric of Kord (CG)?? Makes no sense... Maybe a few similarities, but not the whole list!
A healing pool could be given as a class feature, and wizards should be able to use cure spells.




D&D Next seems to be already doing this. If you compare the two premade Clerics, the Sun Cleric can access different spells than the War Cleric can. The choice of “domain” has a major effect on the spell list. 

I think any 'magical' healing, be it spell, divine power, or whatever, should take up the cleric's full action for that turn. Why should he/she get to use such a powerful ability AND still be able to cast a spell or make an attack? Healing should not be something that can be done almost instantly.



Because then clerics become extremely boring to play for 90% or more of gamers out there. Nobody wants to be forced to play a healbot.




If they were casting heals every round, THEN they would be a healbot. If that were the case, I'd say your party was in a world of hurt anyway or your DM needed to work on his encounter-making skills. In-combat healing should only be done when absolutely necessary. It shouldn't be the norm, it should be the exception.
"Death smiles at us all. All a man can do is smile back."
Divide Cleric "spells" into two categories.

Prayers- healing/buff spells

Miracles- glowy hammers and pillars of fire.

Let these progress independently and have three options at creation.

Saint- mostly prayers with some miracles

Battle Priest- balanced progression

Hand of god- few prayers mostly miracles.

Edition wars kill players,Dungeons and Dragons needs every player it can get.

I think any 'magical' healing, be it spell, divine power, or whatever, should take up the cleric's full action for that turn. Why should he/she get to use such a powerful ability AND still be able to cast a spell or make an attack? Healing should not be something that can be done almost instantly.



Because then clerics become extremely boring to play for 90% or more of gamers out there. Nobody wants to be forced to play a healbot.




If they were casting heals every round, THEN they would be a healbot. If that were the case, I'd say your party was in a world of hurt anyway or your DM needed to work on his encounter-making skills. In-combat healing should only be done when absolutely necessary. It shouldn't be the norm, it should be the exception.



The cleric does not have to heal every round to feel like a healbot.  If the cleric feels as if he or she has to save his spells for healing, then he or she will end up feeling limited for choices.  

I propose that clerics heal (in part or whole) using Divine Channeling.  The damage they can heal expending 1 divine channelling, should scale with level.  There should also be an ability that produces a healing aura (like the channel radiance ability -- or like the healing aura in Pathfinder).

At 1st level, if a player has 4+ Divine Channeling slots for turning undead or healing, I think that will take the pressure off and allow the player to use other spells rather than hording spells in case healing is necessary later.

 

A Brave Knight of WTF - "Wielder of the Sword of Balance"

 

Rhenny's Blog:  http://community.wizards.com/user/1497701/blog

 

 

We playteste last night.  As I mentioend elsewhere, the answer was obvious to my players.  They went back to town after every foray and while they rested, the cleric brewed many healing potions.  This saved the party and allowed her to do her thing.

Again, so many people are forgetting the artifacts clerics can make to augment this section of their lives.  There is no need to rely solely on the cleric.  the Opelor Cleric max's out the healing her potions do!!!  That's pretty awesome and a very worthwhile use of downtime.

So I'd start embracing this element of the class features.
We playteste last night.  As I mentioend elsewhere, the answer was obvious to my players.  They went back to town after every foray and while they rested, the cleric brewed many healing potions.  This saved the party and allowed her to do her thing.

Again, so many people are forgetting the artifacts clerics can make to augment this section of their lives.  There is no need to rely solely on the cleric.  the Opelor Cleric max's out the healing her potions do!!!  That's pretty awesome and a very worthwhile use of downtime.

So I'd start embracing this element of the class features.




I have to admit, in our second playtest, when the PCs had scored some gold for rescuing the merchant, the Cleric of Pelor was psyched that he could make 4 potions for their next foray into the caves. 

A Brave Knight of WTF - "Wielder of the Sword of Balance"

 

Rhenny's Blog:  http://community.wizards.com/user/1497701/blog

 

 

Why only four?   Or haven't they found the suits of plate mail yet?  One of those converts to 30 potions.


Carl  
They didn't find the plate mail.  I'm trying to curb the treasure too.  The players in my group aren't the "pick their bones and take out their gold teeth" type of players.  I generally give them silver, and the smaller treasures (they haven't horded weapons and other objects to pawn them back at town) and pay them off with a reward.   They also wanted to use reward money to upgrade armor for the fighter and the rogue, so I let them do that too.

Cheers. 

A Brave Knight of WTF - "Wielder of the Sword of Balance"

 

Rhenny's Blog:  http://community.wizards.com/user/1497701/blog

 

 

Well, finding a over a thousand gold worth of arms and armor lying around in a room isn't exactly "pick their bones and take out their gold teeth" play.


Carl
Why only four?   Or haven't they found the suits of plate mail yet?  One of those converts to 30 potions.


Carl  


My players used the plate mail.

Also they only made 4 potions.

I guess it is a difference in play style but my group is already saving up for Dragonscale and Adamantine armors etc.

Plus with "all better in the morning" healing they aren't really concerned with potions.

The group was 4 players and an NPC Slayer when they took out the goblins in a single run.

3 new players joined and doubled up on Rogues and added two fighters to the mix and the party continued on to take out the Hobgoblins without resting from the goblin fights.

It very nearly took the lives of two slayers and a rogue but they did it all with two healing potions (one found in treasure), one Cure light wounds, and two healing word spells.

The wizard made good with a well placed burning hands at the goblin guard station and a sleep spell in the goblin commons.  They then went toe to toe with the hobgoblins by charging in the back door after an escapee.  This led to them facing all of the hobgoblins by the 4th round of fighting the Warlord and his retainers.  When they decided to retreat the mage let loose with a third sleep spell that turned the tide back in the party's favor and with the Warlord down cleanup was cake.

It helped that it was a larger group for the second set of combat but I usually game with a group of 6-7 so it was a great test of a larger party dynamic.

Anyhow back on point.  Healing potions aren't on the list of things they sink all gold into and if it were I feel the necessary herbs would be desirable and magical enough to put reasonable availability restrictions on.

Edition wars kill players,Dungeons and Dragons needs every player it can get.

Why only four?   Or haven't they found the suits of plate mail yet?  One of those converts to 30 potions.


Carl  

Exactly why *money* cant balance game system mechanics. Only mechanics can balance mechanics.

Regarding the different dieties with different spell lists, this was already done in 2E.  In that system, your Gawd (I like that) had certain Spheres of Influence and all the spells were divided into different Spheres.  If your Gawd did not have that Sphere, you could not cast spells from that Sphere.  2E had its problems, but clerics/priests was not one of them.  Not sure why that changed when 3 came out.  I happen to enjoy the Forgotten Realms setting, and a softcover book titled "Faiths and Avatars" was published that gave a huge amount of detail to each diety and provided large variations on clerics of that diety, such that playing a cleric (priest) of Lathander was wholly different than playing a cleric of Shar - especially as it related to powers and spell lists.   

Regarding the healing/positive energy issue, this is how Pathfinder works right now (if I understand the comments in this thread).  In Pathfinder, a cleric has a certain number of "energy surges" per day that can be used to heal (they can also be used to damage undead as the energy is considered "positive").  The heal or damage also scales with level.  

Another thing that got killed in the transition from 2E to 3E was the "healing" skill could be used to bind wounds after a combat giving back a few hit points.  Why did this go away?  All PC's had access to this skill if they chose to spend the appropriate skill points on it.  Makes perfect sense to me as healing cuts/scrapes and minor woulds is probably something most people would have an interest in coming from a medival world.  

Don't get me wrong, coming from 2E to 3E was so much better from a game mechanic standpoint, but why not keep some of the good ideas of the system?  
 
This is true.

5e putting in Hit Die goes toward the med kit healing.

And from the very distinct clerics I can only assume that is a reflection I the good ol spheres.

Edition wars kill players,Dungeons and Dragons needs every player it can get.

Healbot occurs when one of two things occurs:
1) healing is soo much better than other spells that the cleric feels like they can only cast healing spells
2) healing always uses a full action, meaning the cleric feels pressured to give attacks to heal. Right now, in 5e, the cleric has a spell that allows them to heal and attack. So, two is fixed. It's less powerful than a spell that only heals, so its balanced.
Healing is generally weak, and there are better spells, so #1 doesnt hold. So, people playing as healbots are just playing to what used to be the best strategy. However, if 4e and rituals taught me anything, it's that surface anaylsis will trump perfect play, and your game will be judged because of it. So, I'd recommend a rule - only 1/2 of a clerics spells can be healing, unless they take a specific theme. For those who like being healbots, they can, but for those who don't, they can still have other options, have enough healing to not be "the cleric that doesn't heal", and still get to use cool spells like spiritual hammer.
Note: for those lookin to use turn undead as another pool of healing - sure, as long as you ban eveh healing spell. That also ensures that clerics have a mix of healing and non healing, and don't get buttonholed into "only healing".
If the cleric is to get to heal and do something else in a round then it's time to take away their heavy armor and weapons. Just make them another wizard class that casts cure spells and get it over with.

Better yet, let the Wizard prepare heal spells.



+1.  If no one wants to play a cleric anyway, why have them?

Play without a healer?

It's what I do.

Edition wars kill players,Dungeons and Dragons needs every player it can get.

EVERYONE can use a weapon and *some* kind of armor.
EVERYONE uses "skills"
HALF use "Magic Spells"
ONE can heal.

Wizards feel special. They have a "special" ability, that while useable by others, they are still the best.

Fighters don't feel special because "using weapons and armor" isn't actually special, unless fighters can truly be the BEST at using weapons and armor (no edition has done this)

Rogues are mixed bag. In some editions, they were special with their skills, in others, wizards could always do better with a spell.

Clerics feel too special. They can use weapons and armor, get spells, and have decent skills. But its Healing thats their specialness, and they are the only ones to heal. Its a lot of pressure. Maybe not always Healbot, but he pressure is there.

I think *more* healing needs to be given to the other classes. Fighters and rogues might be good at triage, maximizing a heal kit, for example. Really, what part of praying to a god makes you good at triage? If you have spells, why would you develop such a skill? No, fighters/rogues should be good at triage. Wizards should be the weakest healers, perhaps "shield" spell being a reaction that can mitigate damage or block an attack outright, usable on others. Preventing damage is as good as healing it (more on that later). Clerics should stick with the direct heal spells.

Giving players more reactions to prevent damage goes a long way to alleviating the healbot feel of playing a cleric. In fact, to give reactions a unique space, they should primarily be defensive in nature (to prevent reaction bloat and out-of-turn paralysis).


I think *more* healing needs to be given to the other classes. Fighters and rogues might be good at triage, maximizing a heal kit, for example. Really, what part of praying to a god makes you good at triage? If you have spells, why would you develop such a skill? No, fighters/rogues should be good at triage. Wizards should be the weakest healers, perhaps "shield" spell being a reaction that can mitigate damage or block an attack outright, usable on others. Preventing damage is as good as healing it (more on that later). Clerics should stick with the direct heal spells.

Giving players more reactions to prevent damage goes a long way to alleviating the healbot feel of playing a cleric. In fact, to give reactions a unique space, they should primarily be defensive in nature (to prevent reaction bloat and out-of-turn paralysis).



+1.  I have said it before, and I will say it again, why did the "healing" skill from 2E lose its ability to give back a few HPs after a combat.  Binding of wounds allowed for a few HPs to be recovered and could be used by any class.  Makes sense.  As a DM, I always was very generous with those HPs recovered.  Was it a bit much? Maybe if you follow the 1 HP per day recovery period, but it felt more natural than just "surging" up some healing.  


I think *more* healing needs to be given to the other classes. Fighters and rogues might be good at triage, maximizing a heal kit, for example. Really, what part of praying to a god makes you good at triage? If you have spells, why would you develop such a skill? No, fighters/rogues should be good at triage. Wizards should be the weakest healers, perhaps "shield" spell being a reaction that can mitigate damage or block an attack outright, usable on others. Preventing damage is as good as healing it (more on that later). Clerics should stick with the direct heal spells.

Giving players more reactions to prevent damage goes a long way to alleviating the healbot feel of playing a cleric. In fact, to give reactions a unique space, they should primarily be defensive in nature (to prevent reaction bloat and out-of-turn paralysis).



+1.  I have said it before, and I will say it again, why did the "healing" skill from 2E lose its ability to give back a few HPs after a combat.  Binding of wounds allowed for a few HPs to be recovered and could be used by any class.  Makes sense.  As a DM, I always was very generous with those HPs recovered.  Was it a bit much? Maybe if you follow the 1 HP per day recovery period, but it felt more natural than just "surging" up some healing.  


How can Wizards not heal? They can shapechange and regenerate. Simply mend bone and transform flesh.

Probably I want to see different kinds of healing:

• Martial healing (triage)
• Arcane healing (advanced proto-science, psycho-soma)
• Divine healing (miraculous)

Alternatives to healing might include:

• Martial vigor (anesthetics, altered states)
• Arcane vigor (stoneskin, artificial limbs)
• Anti-Divine vigor (undeath)
• Divine vigor (angelic transfiguration)



Probably themes are the good to go. Then any player who wants to be a healer can pick up the theme.


Carl  

Exactly why *money* cant balance game system mechanics. Only mechanics can balance mechanics.




Yet it can be a mechanic.  So there you go.  One thats beleivable.
Exactly why *money* cant balance game system mechanics. Only mechanics can balance mechanics.

Yet it can be a mechanic.  So there you go.  One thats beleivable.

Well, in a near-future game like Shadowrun, the game uses money as mechanic. In fact, money and experience points are the same thing. You level up (gaining new features) depending on how much money you make.

In the context of that game, money=levels, makes sense to me. In fact, it is disturbingly clever and plausible.
 
The Shadowrun game is an extremely specific story setting. Unlike D&D there really is no interest in alternative adventure settings. The money=levels mechanic makes less sense for cataclysm settings that lack money.





However, D&D uses experience points to determine when to level up. Money should be irrelevant to advancement. Unfortunately if the mechanics requires the DM to give adventurers a certain amount of money, then it destroys every adventure story that requires the adventurers to be rich or poor.

Money is a factor that determines the flavor of a story setting. D&D works best when mechanics get out of the way of the players who need to choose the setting that they want for their adventures.

Another problem is: D&D already has a leveling mechanic - experience points. Adding yet another mechanic - money - to measure the powers and features that the adventurers acquire, creates dissonance that destabilizes the reliability of either method to ensure gaming balance.

Worse, using money is inherently unreliable because, in D&D, focusing on narrative style is a legitimate way to play. There are many examples where adventures can do something - that according to the story - should result in extremely unbalanced amounts of money. Such as theft, or such as your level-1 adventurer receiving billions of astral diamonds from your level-28 adventurer who is his parent. In D&D it would be wrong according to the story to deny these kinds of transactions. Oppositely, when it makes no sense in the story for money to appear, its sudden appearance for mechanical reasons breaks immersion and disrupts the game. And turns what might be a moving story into a joke.

Yet it can be a mechanic.  So there you go.  One thats beleivable.

Well, in a near-future game like Shadowrun, the game uses money as mechanic. In fact, money and experience points are the same thing. You level up (gaining new features) depending on how much money you make.
Is that something new with SR4?  In all my years of SR2 and SR 3, Karma = experience and money = paying rent (or buying implants/foci/guns/etc, if you get a lot of it).

The metagame is not the game.

In my 4e campaign, I got rid of healing surges, but I added an action that everyone could take using Healing Skill.   In combat, the players can forfeit an action to apply first aid (DC 10).  Success adds 1d4+con bonus (of recepient).  This is helpful, especially at lower levels.  It also becomes an in combat choice for anyone.   If a PC is hurt, he can shift back from combat and perform first aid.  It can only be successful 1 time after the injured PC suffers a new hit point loss, so it cannot be spammed.  It simulates bandaging, applying ointments, etc. 

Since 5e has the HD of healing using the healer's kit, I'm not sure my first aid option would work.  But, if the first aid also used the healing kit, maybe it would.   

A Brave Knight of WTF - "Wielder of the Sword of Balance"

 

Rhenny's Blog:  http://community.wizards.com/user/1497701/blog

 

 

I dont see why just one idea can work.  Many things can provide healing properties!
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