Iconic Villians regardless of genre

14 posts / 0 new
Last post
Has any one successfully incorporated famous villians from either book, movie, etc into any tourney style games? Did the players enjoy it?
For the past two Christmas I have created seasonal encounters in which the party have had to foil Jack Frost.
Has any one successfully incorporated famous villians from either book, movie, etc into any tourney style games? Did the players enjoy it?



I've never played a tourney-style game, and I've never incorporated a famous villain into one of my games.

However, it's pretty much part of the whole idea behind Ravenloft as a campaign setting:  "expies" (thinly-disguised clones) of famous literary monsters like Dracula, Dr. Frankenstein and his monster, Dr. Moreau, Jeckyl and Hyde, Jack the Ripper, and so on are all official and important parts of the setting... names are changed and the stories altered a bit, but a game in the Ravenloft setting would probably not be the same without these famous villains.
[spoiler New DM Tips]
  • Trying to solve out-of-game problems (like cheating, bad attitudes, or poor sportsmanship) with in-game solutions will almost always result in failure, and will probably make matters worse.
  • Gun Safety Rule #5: Never point the gun at anything you don't intend to destroy. (Never introduce a character, PC, NPC, Villain, or fate of the world into even the possibility of a deadly combat or other dangerous situation, unless you are prepared to destroy it instantly and completely forever.)
  • Know your group's character sheets, and check them over carefully. You don't want surprises, but, more importantly, they are a gold mine of ideas!
  • "If it ain't broke, don't fix it." It's a problem if the players aren't having fun and it interferes with a DM's ability to run the game effectively; if it's not a problem, 'fixing' at best does little to help, and at worst causes problems that didn't exist before.
  • "Hulk Smash" characters are a bad match for open-ended exploration in crowds of civilians; get them out of civilization where they can break things and kill monsters in peace.
  • Success is not necessarily the same thing as killing an opponent. Failure is not necessarily the same thing as dying.
  • Failure is always an option. And it's a fine option, too, as long as failure is interesting, entertaining, and fun!
[/spoiler] The New DM's Group Horror in RPGs "This is exactly what the Leprechauns want you to believe!" - Merb101 "Broken or not, unbalanced or not, if something seems to be preventing the game from being enjoyable, something has to give: either that thing, or other aspects of the game, or your idea of what's enjoyable." - Centauri
No tourney games for me either, but I have made:
Daleks, Warlock (from the Julian Sands movie), Highlander immortals, and TRON lightcycles.

Played in a gamma world game with Robotech vehicles (don't get started on Robotech vs Macross and Mospeada), and a time-travel game where the enemy Nazi soldiers were represented by storm troopers and imp officers.
Actually, dungeon-punk spell-casting Dalek expies sound like they could be a lot of fun as villains....
[spoiler New DM Tips]
  • Trying to solve out-of-game problems (like cheating, bad attitudes, or poor sportsmanship) with in-game solutions will almost always result in failure, and will probably make matters worse.
  • Gun Safety Rule #5: Never point the gun at anything you don't intend to destroy. (Never introduce a character, PC, NPC, Villain, or fate of the world into even the possibility of a deadly combat or other dangerous situation, unless you are prepared to destroy it instantly and completely forever.)
  • Know your group's character sheets, and check them over carefully. You don't want surprises, but, more importantly, they are a gold mine of ideas!
  • "If it ain't broke, don't fix it." It's a problem if the players aren't having fun and it interferes with a DM's ability to run the game effectively; if it's not a problem, 'fixing' at best does little to help, and at worst causes problems that didn't exist before.
  • "Hulk Smash" characters are a bad match for open-ended exploration in crowds of civilians; get them out of civilization where they can break things and kill monsters in peace.
  • Success is not necessarily the same thing as killing an opponent. Failure is not necessarily the same thing as dying.
  • Failure is always an option. And it's a fine option, too, as long as failure is interesting, entertaining, and fun!
[/spoiler] The New DM's Group Horror in RPGs "This is exactly what the Leprechauns want you to believe!" - Merb101 "Broken or not, unbalanced or not, if something seems to be preventing the game from being enjoyable, something has to give: either that thing, or other aspects of the game, or your idea of what's enjoyable." - Centauri

 Does the Purple Pieman from Strawberry Shortcake count?

 Not so much his whole pie schtick (I replaced trying to steal all the berries with stealing magical amulets to power a necromantic ritual), but the evil necromancer in the adventure was definitely blatantly recognizeable as the Pieman with a significantly darker coat of paint.

It was a one-shot adventure that had the party start off thinking it was a regular adventure adventure, before I convinced them it was a comedy adventure (with the village of werebears they were trying to save turning out to be were-Carebears and having them travel through what was basically Candyland) before turning everything horribly, horribly pear-shaped and morphing it into a horror adventure with giant chocolate-covered ants melting into puddles of foul-smelling burnt chocolate when fireballed, players' weapons getting stuck in the gummi-orcs with a sickening squelch and having the orcs pick up the severed limbs of different-colored gummi-orcs and reattaching them to their own stumps as the two colors blended together, and a friendly Booberry-style marshmallow ghost whose empty eyes bled blueberry syrup just before it cut loose with a banshee's deadly wail.

 One of my very early efforts as a DM when I was about 11 years old had the players literally face off against every movie and book villain I could manage to stat up. What they were all doing in the same castle was never quite made clear beyond some sort of "villain convention" to discuss destroying the world, or something to that effect. Aside from the one bright spot of Darth Vader accidentally hitting Sauron with a Force-deflected fireball and getting his entire dome knocked clean off his shoulders in return, I prefer not to dwell too long on the whole debacle.

 For the most part, though, most of my villains tend to be a mix-and-match mishmash of little bits and pieces of popular villains so churned together that the original influences aren't immediately recognizeable...

Show

I am the Magic Man.

(Pay no attention to the man behind the curtain.)

 

I am the Lawnmower Man.

(I AM GOD HERE!)

 

I am the Skull God.

(Koo Koo Ka Choo)

 

There are reasons they call me Mad...


 Does the Purple Pieman from Strawberry Shortcake count?

 Not so much his whole pie schtick (I replaced trying to steal all the berries with stealing magical amulets to power a necromantic ritual), but the evil necromancer in the adventure was definitely blatantly recognizeable as the Pieman with a significantly darker coat of paint.

It was a one-shot adventure that had the party start off thinking it was a regular adventure adventure, before I convinced them it was a comedy adventure (with the village of werebears they were trying to save turning out to be were-Carebears and having them travel through what was basically Candyland) before turning everything horribly, horribly pear-shaped and morphing it into a horror adventure with giant chocolate-covered ants melting into puddles of foul-smelling burnt chocolate when fireballed, players' weapons getting stuck in the gummi-orcs with a sickening squelch and having the orcs pick up the severed limbs of different-colored gummi-orcs and reattaching them to their own stumps as the two colors blended together, and a friendly Booberry-style marshmallow ghost whose empty eyes bled blueberry syrup just before it cut loose with a banshee's deadly wail.

 One of my very early efforts as a DM when I was about 11 years old had the players literally face off against every movie and book villain I could manage to stat up. What they were all doing in the same castle was never quite made clear beyond some sort of "villain convention" to discuss destroying the world, or something to that effect. Aside from the one bright spot of Darth Vader accidentally hitting Sauron with a Force-deflected fireball and getting his entire dome knocked clean off his shoulders in return, I prefer not to dwell too long on the whole debacle.

 For the most part, though, most of my villains tend to be a mix-and-match mishmash of little bits and pieces of popular villains so churned together that the original influences aren't immediately recognizeable...




0_0............you sir are screwed up...........has anyone ever told you that........they probably did........................
Has any one successfully incorporated famous villians from either book, movie, etc into any tourney style games?

No, but I sometimes use pictures of movie characters (including famous villians) as pictures for NPC's.

tourney style game

Curious: how is this different from regular games here?

I haven’t done tourney style games but...


I did use Hans Gruber as a Karrn Warlord, and Francis Hummel as a disgruntled Brelish general (both in Eberron). Hummel was from the lesser film (and I am actually only 90% certain I got the name right), but the character I based on him was one of the most memorable villains I have ever created.

There are several other film and literary references I have made, but those were the two to jump into my head.

I also have used a few real life political figures as villains, but I am wary of mentioning those and offending anyone's political beliefs.


 

(snip) I did use Hans Gruber as a Karrn Warlord, and Francis Hummel as a disgruntled Brelish general (both in Eberron). Hummel was from the lesser film (and I am actually only 90% certain I got the name right), but the character I based on him was one of the most memorable villains I have ever created. (snip)



Awesome. Hummel would be perfect in that role. Well played.
Cheers Imruphel aka Scrivener of Doom
www.movievillains.com/ is a great resource for DMs

IMAGE(http://www.nodiatis.com/pub/20.jpg)


0_0............you sir are screwed up...........has anyone ever told you that........they probably did........................


 Only my shrink...   (Seriously? I go by Mad Jack, have a grinning green skull as an avatar, and you're asking me if anyone's told me I'm screwed up? lol... There are reasons they call me Mad...)

(The players, on the other hand, thanked me for one of the best adventures they'd ever played. They were a good group like that - they had absolute trust in me that no matter where my twisted brain took them it would be a hell of a trip and they'd always just shrug, ask a few relevant questions and then jump in with both feet.)


Show

I am the Magic Man.

(Pay no attention to the man behind the curtain.)

 

I am the Lawnmower Man.

(I AM GOD HERE!)

 

I am the Skull God.

(Koo Koo Ka Choo)

 

There are reasons they call me Mad...


0_0............you sir are screwed up...........has anyone ever told you that........they probably did........................


 Only my shrink...   (Seriously? I go by Mad Jack, have a grinning green skull as an avatar, and you're asking me if anyone's told me I'm screwed up? lol... There are reasons they call me Mad...)

(The players, on the other hand, thanked me for one of the best adventures they'd ever played. They were a good group like that - they had absolute trust in me that no matter where my twisted brain took them it would be a hell of a trip and they'd always just shrug, ask a few relevant questions and then jump in with both feet.)





....gooooood point.........yah it seemed like a fun idea and I guess your players would be used to that kind of stuff if you DM for them alot. Really it's not my position to complain or judge which I was never trying to do considering I have a tendency to make characters that just make my DM and the other players go wtf....once played a living tree that was powered by the influence of the far realm....just got up on daye and just started following the party. They got used to the fact that a psuedo eldritch abomination wants to be their friend and just started treating him like one of the gang.
once played a living tree that was powered by the influence of the far realm....just got up on daye and just started following the party.


   Heh... I had an old-edition Gamma World character that was a telepathic six-foot-tall blue tree that shot laser beams out of its eyestalks and rode around in a nuclear-powered go-cart. (Yay, completely randomized character generation - he wasn't even the funkiest guy in the party, lol)

 On topic, I've also borrowed King Lear, the Harpy (homebrewed stats), the Red Bull (statted as a gorgon) and Mommy Fortuna (either a green or night hag, I forget which, with a few wizard levels) from The Last Unicorn, though none of them were actually the main villains of their respective pieces...

 When I start planning out an adventure, I generally start with the What, i.e., the Evil Plan, and then think of the Who, the sort of villain that'd be trying to pull off that particular bit of misanthropy. I usually make up a short list of movie/tv/book villains who've done similar things and study them to see what I can draw from them to use for my own guy. Occasionally, one of them will be close enough to what I really want to go for on their own with slight adjustments to fit the campaign, but most of the time I just grab a few things from each of them.

 Villains I'd love to find a place for in one of my games (or even write an adventure or campaign specifically to use them): Darkness and Blix from the movie Legend, Col. William Tavington from The Patriot, The Six-fingered Man and Vizzini from The Princess Bride, Dr. Decker and Father Ashberry (post-transformation) from Nightbreed, Dancer, Kellanved and Kallor (and about a dozen others, lol) from Steven Erickson's Malazan Book of the Fallen novels, the Brotherhood of the Wolf from the movie of the same name and Bill the Butcher from Gangs of New York...


Show

I am the Magic Man.

(Pay no attention to the man behind the curtain.)

 

I am the Lawnmower Man.

(I AM GOD HERE!)

 

I am the Skull God.

(Koo Koo Ka Choo)

 

There are reasons they call me Mad...