How Should Levels Progress?

I think levels should progress like this. What is your idea?

Characters start with
3 racial traits
3 background skills
3 class feature powers(feats, skills, prayers, spells)
constitution score+6 to 12 hit points depending on class

+1 power(feat, skill, prayer or spell) every level

+1 to an ability (cap humanoid natural 20(+5)) every even level

+6-12 hit points every odd level???

+1 to all power(feat, skill, prayer and spell) bonuses every 5 levels. For example, WeaponProficiency(Longsword)+2 at 5th level
+1 standard action per turn every 5 levels. This is the way damage dice will increase.
A fighter can max attack twice with his main weapon and 3 times with his off-hand weapon at 20th level.
A wizard can max shoot 5 magic missiles at the same target or 5 different targets at 20th level. But she can only cast 1 burst or render-helpless spell per encounter

One thing this does is keep the bonuses down.
All feat bonuses go to abilities and abilities determine the to hit and damage. Max 20(+5) or possibily 30(+10) if magic that powerful is allowed.
The hit points and the damage numbers will also go down. Characters and monsters get hit points every other level which cuts the numbers in half. Damage only increases with more than one standard attack so it progresses every 5 levels.

A 20th level fighter with a natural constitution of 20+10 static hit points per level might have a maximum of 120 hit points and possibly do a maximum of 5 standard action attacks at 1d10+10. Between 2 20th level opponents this combat could be resolved in as little as 3 rounds.



I don't care how it works, so long as there are no dead levels.
With scaling attack/defense going away, there is a very significant chance of craptons of dead levels in 5E.
I would prefer to see less each level than your list, OP, and give options to build from there.  I and some of my players enjoy the low-powered hero.  We're the 'level 1 characters are literally nobodies' type of players, and your list is the kind of level/power acquisition which says 'level 13, watch out gods here we come'.   I'm hoping bounded accuracy also means to pull ability scores back down to reason.  That 'I have a 39 strength!' stuff was old the moment I heard it.

Just my opinion.

"Lightning...it flashes bright, then fades away.  It can't protect, it can only destroy."

I don't care too much for rising stats as in +1 to a stat per 4 levels....the stats just end up being too much a focus of the game. (make stat items extremely rare)
Levels shouldn't be restricted to blocks or tiers, as this type of gaming style often forces the group to be run at a single xp total and i enjoy personal gaming rewards to players who go above and beyond with the way they play.

 I don't mind seeing a group where the spread can be as much as 5 levels. Some players actually find it a great challenge to actually play the rookie.

I'd like to see training costs per level based on class xp charts (which implies varying xp table based on difficulty or power of the class). I'd like to see another option of leveling up slower (maybe taking twice as much xp) to train oneself if you didn't want to opt for formal training in a guildhouse or from some other veteran.

There shouldn't be level limits.....there should be bold enough writers who simply make modules for higher level play. (individual groups can label what they want as "high level").

We never set caps on our spells. If you are a wizard level 27 ...then thats 27d6 fireballs or 14 magic missiles. Fighters can start to create their own weapon styles post level 9 and can pretty much pull from any source in D&D or any other game for that matter as inspiration for their styles they create, rogues at level 11. Clerics can create their own spells(prayers) at level 14. We play a pretty open ended 1e-2e meld thats simply gotten better over the years.
I don't care how it works, so long as there are no dead levels.
With scaling attack/defense going away, there is a very significant chance of craptons of dead levels in 5E.

Easily solved by every odd level gaining a benefit from the theme, and every even level  (but also including first level) gaining a benefit fomr your class.  
I don't care how it works, so long as there are no dead levels.
With scaling attack/defense going away, there is a very significant chance of craptons of dead levels in 5E.

Easily solved by every odd level gaining a benefit from the theme, and every even level  (but also including first level) gaining a benefit fomr your class.  

Huh.  I take it you've played SWSE.

Nope, haven't played and I don't know what it is, but I did pay close attention to the playtest packet.
How Should Levels Progress?

In an increasing linear progression by integers? Preferrably in base 10, but I'd settle for octal if we must.

I don't care too much for rising stats as in +1 to a stat per 4 levels....the stats just end up being too much a focus of the game. (make stat items extremely rare)

Uh... what 4e were you playing? Stats ceased to matter at all after about level 10, and weren't that important in the first place.

Contrast the new edition, where your stats are of critical importance, since they're used directly for your saves, checks and contests.

Levels shouldn't be restricted to blocks or tiers, as this type of gaming style often forces the group to be run at a single xp total and i enjoy personal gaming rewards to players who go above and beyond with the way they play.

Nothing in 4e stopped you from doing this. You do know that 4e's Tiers were more of a metagame reference-framing device for the DM, right? A 10th level PC and an 11th level PC can coexist just fine--there's not some zomghueg difference between the two.

I don't mind seeing a group where the spread can be as much as 5 levels. Some players actually find it a great challenge to actually play the rookie.

I can't think of a single edition of D&D where that was within the system's mathematical intent. You can do it, sure, but in any edition you're going far enough out of your way as the DM that you might as well be writing a new splatbook for it.

I'd like to see training costs per level based on class xp charts (which implies varying xp table based on difficulty or power of the class). I'd like to see another option of leveling up slower (maybe taking twice as much xp) to train oneself if you didn't want to opt for formal training in a guildhouse or from some other veteran.

What you want is called storytelling. You don't need mechanics for it (no, really, I promise you don't).

There shouldn't be level limits.....there should be bold enough writers who simply make modules for higher level play. (individual groups can label what they want as "high level").

All that requires is a mathematical backbone to character progression that is visible to the players. Out of boredom one afternoon, I extrapolated 4e's level progressions out from -10 to 50 just to see if it could be done. Unlike in 3rd ed epic-play, 4e's system actually scales indefinitely upward without falling apart on you.

We never set caps on our spells. If you are a wizard level 27 ...then thats 27d6 fireballs or 14 magic missiles. Fighters can start to create their own weapon styles post level 9 and can pretty much pull from any source in D&D or any other game for that matter as inspiration for their styles they create, rogues at level 11. Clerics can create their own spells(prayers) at level 14. We play a pretty open ended 1e-2e meld thats simply gotten better over the years.

I suggest you keep playing that, then. I'm not being snarky on this one, either, by the way. If you have a system that works for you and that you like, why bother abandoning it for a new one that you'll end up houseruling to hell and back to make it look like the old one anyway?

Nope, haven't played and I don't know what it is, but I did pay close attention to the playtest packet.

SWSE is Star Wars Saga Edition, the most recent version (2007ish) of the d20 system Star Wars games. Its level progression was exactly what you suggested. 


Nope, haven't played and I don't know what it is, but I did pay close attention to the playtest packet.

SWSE is Star Wars Saga Edition, the most recent version (2007ish) of the d20 system Star Wars games. Its level progression was exactly what you suggested. 




Then it looks like Mearls and Co took a cue from SWSE, because so far that is exactly what they have described, and the playtest packets reflect.
Debatable. They've arrived at the same conclusion, at least. I couldn't say for sure if they're actually drawing from SWSE intentionally. Won't know until we see the character build rules.