My Drow is Pregnant!

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One of the players in a mature group I'm DMing has a drow who is now pregnant. What kind checks should I have the player make and what kind of changes and modifiers for her stats will I need and when(chronological guesstimation)?
One of the players in a mature group I'm DMing has a drow who is now pregnant. What kind checks should I have the player make and what kind of changes and modifiers for her stats will I need and when(chronological guesstimation)?

You don't NEED to make any checks or changes. The risk to the baby if the character should die seems like enough of a hindrance.

[N]o difference is less easily overcome than the difference of opinion about semi-abstract questions. - L. Tolstoy

Or, you know, just handwave away the gestational period.
"It's been [time].  The drow has a kid now."
I'm guessing DEX would go down the bigger she gets, her mood would change so maybe a shift in CHA as well.

Is it a normal pregnancy? Magical or Demon children may have other side effects.
Just in case I failed to mention; I am playing D&D 3.5e.
I think this thread has a high chance of swinging into really inappropriate territory.

[N]o difference is less easily overcome than the difference of opinion about semi-abstract questions. - L. Tolstoy

I'm guessing DEX would go down the bigger she gets, her mood would change so maybe a shift in CHA as well.

Is it a normal pregnancy? Magical or Demon children may have other side effects.




normal

I think this thread has a high chance of swinging into really inappropriate territory.

LOL yeah, but my group is "mature audience only", . . . this isn't the worst we've done"

Then you and I have very different definitions of the word "mature."

[N]o difference is less easily overcome than the difference of opinion about semi-abstract questions. - L. Tolstoy

I think this thread has a high chance of swinging into really inappropriate territory.



rule 34 on prego drow prons plz.
One thing to consider is that a Drow pregancy is unlikely to mirror a human one. Drow, however different, are a type of elf and as such share the fae characteristics in terms of their bodily functions. A race that does not require sleep and lives for centuries will likely have a very different gestational process than other races. I don't know if there are any flavour texts that lay this out but the pregnancy may last for months or years, the mother may be significantly hampered or may feel very little effect. Perhaps the gestational period lasts for years and only in the very last stages does the mother begin to "show" and feel physical effects. As the DM the details are up to you and how you want this to effect the party.

Do you want to get it out of the way and have the baby left with a wet-nurse or do you and the player want the drow to go through an extended pregnancy and child rearing process? In the latter case maybe they should be retired to NPC status. How you handle it really depends on how the player would like their character to handle it along with how you feel an elven pregnancy should physically manifest itself in the game. If it's going to be a pregnancy physically similar to a human one then there's just no way the character would be able to keep adventuring. Several close friends have recently gone through pregnancy and none of them seemed likely to be swinging a sword (spell, spear, bow, whatever) around with any kind of alacricity.

If the player is determined that the character would try to soldier on then you would expect gradually increasing penalties to dex and strength, armour to stop fitting and maybe even movement speed to be reduced. In the last stages maybe even applying a permanently fatigued or exhausted state to the character to represent the mobility and other issues that heavily pregnant women encounter. Definitely steer clear of trying to impose any mental (Cha, Wis, Will) penalties based on this. Different people handle pregancy very differently in terms of its effect on mood, etc. If you player is as mature as you say, they will RP this better without rules based inflictions. Again though, all of this is dependent on how you as a DM want to rule that a drow/elven pregnancy actually works in comparison to a human one.
I once read somewhere that Elves have a longer gestational process(like 12 months) but that the pregnancy is relatively smooth and painless for them. Orcs, on the other hand, had a gestational process of only 6 months, but with extremely painful and laborous child birth.

I liked this explanation, as it seems to tie neatly into the longer life-span and lower number of elves(and their lower con, which would presumably make child birth harder on them), while also tying into the tougher, more numerous nature of orcs.

Bear in mind that this has an effect on half-breeds as well: A human female carrying a half-orc would have a shorter gestational period than usual, but also more painful, while for a half-elf it would take longer and be easier on her. An orc mother of a half-orc would experience her child birth as easier than usual, while an elven mother of a half-elf would find her gestational period a lot more uncomfortable than usual, etc.

I'm not sure if I read this in a D&D related work or not, but I think it works fairly well. It adds up in my mind.
9 months in game terms (12 months, whatever) is an eternity.  How far along is she?  I could imagine you game lasting for years and the actual birth never happening.

The main thing would be morning sickness.  So I'd use the disease track to impose a healing surge tax on her.  Obviously if this is happening the player expects some kind of penalty.  Whatever it is should be tied to extended rests because of morning sickness.

Obviously, at (the equivalent of) 7+ months your character can't be an adventurer anymore.  Put that character on the sideline and let her make a new one.  After some time she can pick that character back up, provided she has access to daycare.  Up to 5 or 6 months, however, most women can still be pretty spry.

What kind of campaign are you running?  Is it an overland or dungeon crawl adventure, or are you in a set location like a city or town?
Sleeping with interns on Colonial 1
While we're at it, how about we come up with some house rules to differentiate male and female character ability score modifiers? What other stereotypes can we come up with to offend anyone reading this thread?

Or am I right in remembering the gaming community decided this sort of gender stuff was a bad idea a long time ago?

No amount of tips, tricks, or gimmicks will ever be better than simply talking directly to your fellow players to resolve your issues.
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Who's offended, besides you?  Most posters are approaching this subject as an honest challenge in role playing.  It's constructive.

No one is suggesting that women can't do things that men can, yunno, except when they're pregnant.  Isn't it really the condition of pregnancy that is under consideration here, and not the larger condition of gender?  Would you feel better if the OP was referring to a man who had magically and mysteriously become pregnant?

Is this just more of that "realism in fantasy" that you hate so much?
Sleeping with interns on Colonial 1
Who's offended, besides you?

I reported this thread and asked that it be moved to the mature gaming forum, assuming it still exists.

[N]o difference is less easily overcome than the difference of opinion about semi-abstract questions. - L. Tolstoy

You don't have to post to be offended. Or to think the subject matter is inappropriate. For every one person that posts that they believe the stuff being bandied about here is inappropriate, there are likely many more who think it but don't post.

And I don't "hate" realism in fantasy. I find amusing limited thinking that leads to limited outcomes because of using reality as a crutch in fantasy. This is not the case in this thread.

No amount of tips, tricks, or gimmicks will ever be better than simply talking directly to your fellow players to resolve your issues.
DMs: Don't Prep the Plot | Structure First, Story Last | Prep Tips | Spoilers Don't Spoil Anything | No Myth Roleplaying
Players: 11 Ways to Be a Better Roleplayer | You Are Not Your Character     Hilarious D&D Actual Play Podcast: Crit Juice!

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And for every person offended there are likely many more who were intrigued by the idea and wanted to discuss it, actively.  Why should any one person's feelings matter more than another's.  The difference is that those who may have been offended (though clearly shouldn't have been) can choose not to read the thread, while those who were intrigued, and were handling the thread respectfully, get no such choice.
Sleeping with interns on Colonial 1
Take it up with the mods, pal.

No amount of tips, tricks, or gimmicks will ever be better than simply talking directly to your fellow players to resolve your issues.
DMs: Don't Prep the Plot | Structure First, Story Last | Prep Tips | Spoilers Don't Spoil Anything | No Myth Roleplaying
Players: 11 Ways to Be a Better Roleplayer | You Are Not Your Character     Hilarious D&D Actual Play Podcast: Crit Juice!

FREE CONTENT: Encounters With Alternate Goals  |  Full-Contact Futbol   |   Pre-Gen D&D 5e PCs  |  Re-Imagining Phandelver  |  Three Pillars of Immersion

Follow me on Twitter: @is3rith

You really have a mean streak, don't you?  I'm trying to talk calmly with you, but you're so flippant about everything.

Being cynical is the easiest thing in the world to do.  Don't be so proud of yourself just because you're especially good at it.
Sleeping with interns on Colonial 1
Before this thread get's booted I would like to point out that the conversation was being handle maturely before the argument started.

As for the pregnancy I would suggest that it is handled like any other stat affecting condition, whether it be disease or poison.   Many stat affecting conditions take time to affect the character and present different effects at different times.   For example Zombie rot;  you initially take constitution damage then Strength after a period of time.  This is repeated until either con or str reaches 0 and the character dies.

The pregnancy would be the same, the character would take strength and dexterity damage over the period of gestation and possibly a constitution damage when giving birth.  These stats would slowly return to original values over time.   If the character is in a battle I would also impose as will checks when taking damage due to the fear of hurting the child.  If one of the other player is the father, I would also impose will checks in response to the mother taking damage as well as well as a constant feeling of needing to protect the mother and unborn child.

IMAGE(http://www.nodiatis.com/pub/23.jpg)

How much fighting normally occurs in your campaign?  Do you anticipate a shift to less combat now that one of the members of the party is pregnant?  I'd let the direction the campaign is taking dictate what mechanical effects the pregnancy will have.  If you expect the campaign to have a lot of combat and the character isn't a mental stat primary, I'd lean toward narrating the elven gestation as a longer process with fewer physical symptoms unless the player is amenable to the prospect of his or her character becoming a liability on the battlefield.
"When Friday comes, we'll all call rats fish." D&D Outsider
Do nothing to represent the physical aspects. Nothing. I'm thinking of Major Kira on Deep Space Nine, who didn't let the physical aspects of the pregnancy interfere with her job. Only the risk to the baby caused her and others to limit her duty, but she still went through some physically strenuous situations and handled herself quite capably.

[N]o difference is less easily overcome than the difference of opinion about semi-abstract questions. - L. Tolstoy

Had to get my 11 foot pole so I could post.

If you must have a drawback, dex damage is a way to go.  And if you are going to be handing out negatives for pregnancy, don't forget the positives.

Mood swings(Daily)  Choose one of the following:
Crying swing - The character gains a bonus to diplomacy in sympathy(may not work in evil society).
Anger swing - An effect similar to a barbarian rage that lasts as long as the effect it's emulating.
Happy swing - Moral bonus to resist mind altering effects.

Feel too sad to impliment it, angrily reject it, or happily expand on it.
Mood swings(Daily)  Choose one of the following:
Crying swing - The character gains a bonus to diplomacy in sympathy(may not work in evil society).
Anger swing - An effect similar to a barbarian rage that lasts as long as the effect it's emulating.
Happy swing - Moral bonus to resist mind altering effects.

This is where it starts to get offensive. Can we back off on the supposed mental and emotional effects? The supposed physical effects are bad enough.

[N]o difference is less easily overcome than the difference of opinion about semi-abstract questions. - L. Tolstoy

Supposed?  Mood swings are a documented fact of pregnancy.  Please keep your facts straight and stick to the topic of conversation.  The op is not asking for your opinion on what is offensive and what isn't.  This is about helping a dm run a pregnancy in game.

Hey everyone,

While the topic is a bit mature, everyone seems to come across as providing some really good advice and tips for the original poster without getting into the more rough details of the matter. Just remember to keep everything factual and don't blow anything out of proportion here. Certainly be careful not to call anyone else out ( or attack them) as well.

If you have any questions please feel free to consult the Code of Conduct.

Thanks, and I hope your campaign goes well! 
Supposed?  Mood swings are a documented fact of pregnancy.

But what they should translate into in game terms (if anything) is not. To suggest that it should amount to something other than strong emotions is unnecessary stereotyping.

This is about helping a dm run a pregnancy in game.

I gave him my help. No changes to the character are needed or advised. Focus on what it means to the loyalties of the potential mother when it comes to taking risks, what others think about the child, how certain monsters and NPCs will change their attitude.

The physical, mental and emotional side of it doesn't need to come up and shouldn't. It certainly doesn't need to be discussed here, where, it's safe to assume, the majority of the people have never been pregnant.

[N]o difference is less easily overcome than the difference of opinion about semi-abstract questions. - L. Tolstoy

My personal opinion on the matter is that the less openly you talk about stuff, the more offensive it gets. Everything gets offensive very quickly if we shy away from these subjects. Women have breasts, men has that other thing, and both genders have all kinds of stuff that comes with it. Is this not okay to talk about?

About the mood swings suggestion.... I can also see this as being offensive actually. This should be up to the player to roleplay if she/he so desires. I would not "punish" the pregnant character by giving a penalty to dex and such. Seems unfair, doesn't it?

Do you have to do anything? If you feel you have to, make the pros and cons weigh each other out. When pregnant, a woman becomes protective and the mother instinct kicks in/ass. So if you feel like giving a penalty to dex you should also make mother's instinct a trait or something. Maybe she gets some feat similar to awareness in 3.5 or rage as was previously suggested. She can sense when she and the child is in danger or something like that. 
I also disagree with imposing penalties to abilities and skills.  Honestly, I feel like the Healing surge mechanic is more than enough, and is actually very elegant and effective, to demonstrate physical exhaustion. 

Morning sickness isn't a stereotype.  It's a fact, and many women have a hard time with it, especially in the presence of food, and some of those women have an extremely difficult time with it.  Use the disease track to impose a healing surge tax on her.  That will be plenty.  If she rolls well after an extended rest, she gets over it.  If not, it gets over her.

Beyond that, I really don't see any reason to penalize the character, especially if, as I said before, she's less than 5 or 6 months along.  Pregnancy is not physically debilitating until 7 months or more, at which point it becomes extremely debilitating.

And Centauri's point about the danger of harming the baby is spot on.  If this really is about a solid RP challenge, then your character's eyes have just been opened to the fact that her life isn't about her anymore.  The baby, and the baby's well-being, have got to be the priority.

This is a great opportunity to explore cognitive dissonance, because the character has probably learned that she's pregnant while in the middle of something she previously thought was very important.  Now she has to reevaluate her priorities, which might mean abandoning her quest, and her party when they're counting on her.
Sleeping with interns on Colonial 1
We had a pregnancy in an homecampaign I played in once, though I have to say my character and me didn't notice a thing. They kept it secret rather effectively, so sadly I can't comment on if they took anything actually into account, mechanically or roleplayey. 

That said, I'm with the group that says no mechanical changes to the character are necessary. The character would be able to go about her business as usual, bit with the added danger of harming the baby. The player could use this chance to explore how the PC would handle things like combat and social encounters now that she's pregnant and has a second life to take care of.

I'm assuming the player is an experienced roleplayer and should be able to come up with some interesting ways the character changes. However, if the player finds this difficult, introducing a 'pregnancy' mechanic or two might serve as a crutch. Personally, I find the options below interesting/amusing:


  • Modelling a pregnancy as the 'disease' mechanic. The 4th Ed. disease abstraction gives a nice way of handling different stages of a condition. The character just wouldn't be able to recuperate from each stage, but perhaps a stage can be migitated with the help of 'Heal' or 'Endurance'.

  • Giving the character one less healing surge, to mimic the additional physical strain of being pregnant. The character now actually has less survivability, which can make her reconsider some strenuous activity options.

  • Modelling random mood swings seems amusing. It's a similar mechanic to the Chaos Sorcerer and that Paragon Path that does random stuff on the use of an AP. If every player in the party is on board with this and doesn't consider it offensive, this can give the player something new to try out with this character every once in awhile.


Let us know how it goes.
Heroic Dungeon Master
My wife and I have had two children.


First off every pregnancy is different.  My wife had entirely different problems with the exception of aches and pains.
     
That being said you might want to sit down with the player in question and talk to them what THEY expect out of this pregenancy.

  I have read some rules that it takes a year for an elf to have a baby.  For the Drow it could be sooner only because of their connection to the Spider Queen.  As for the discussion on mood swings, morning sickness, and such talk to the player.


It might be better to make it a RP thing.  If the player wants a penalty on social roles due to being a bit crabby then go for it.  If they want to RP it let them.

To the drow brith is both a beautiful and fightning thing.  This is because drow society is built on treachery.  Also if I remember correctly Drow tend to have more than one child at a time, you know like spider eggs.


Bottom like is that if they is for RPing purposes then by all means RP it up with them.  Get the entire party involved in this.  My question: This is a mature theme group but it is a mature party?

 Considering I recently read an article about a marathon runner who not only ran a marathon while pregnant but ran it the week she was due, I'm pretty damn sure any discussion about "realism" involving huge mechanical penalties to the drow's character is pointless.

Particularly since it's a freaking elf who in no way is restricted to "realistic" human biological norms.

 From a "realism" standpoint...

 - Morning sickness : First, this is under the assumption that elves even get morning sickness... The word "morning" may be a clue that this isn't an all-the-time thing. While the cleric is praying and the wizard reading his spellbook, the drow is puking. If it comes up at all during the day, this is a roleplaying opportunity, full stop. Problem solved.

 - Movement/Ability penalties : See above mention of professional athlete. Not to mention, unless the character is a frontline melee combatant, most of those physical penalties would be almost irrelevant anyway.

 - Mood swings : Seriously? Last I checked, pregnancy wasn't classified as a mental illness. And again, who says elves have mood swings? ROLEPLAYING OPPORTUNITY

 The one thing that actually does need to be adressed from the "realism" point of view is the fact that the character's previous armor and clothing probably won't fit her through the entire pregnancy.
Magic armor has traditionally changed size to fit the wearer, or can be handwaved by a simple use of 4E's Enchant Magic Item spell.
Unless the character wants to roleplay the fact that her clothes no longer fit and she needs to buy new ones, she's either of sufficient level that buying anything short of the queen's coronation gown rarely involves much more than looking under the couch cushions for spare change or a simple spell could be written for the purpose if one doesn't already exist - in fact, I think there actually was a minor spell back in 3.5 that could do that, if it wasn't just covered under the text of the Mending spell.

  As Grimli said, try asking the player how they'd like to handle the situation.


Show

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(Pay no attention to the man behind the curtain.)

 

I am the Lawnmower Man.

(I AM GOD HERE!)

 

I am the Skull God.

(Koo Koo Ka Choo)

 

There are reasons they call me Mad...

If she has a daughter AND if the father of said daughter is Drow, you can play up the desire of the Drow to retrieve such a valuable asset. Or perhaps your hero wants her daughter to end up in Drow society? Seems like a great way to introduce a huge story arch.
I think this thread has a high chance of swinging into really inappropriate territory.



While we're at it, how about we come up with some house rules to differentiate male and female character ability score modifiers? What other stereotypes can we come up with to offend anyone reading this thread?

Or am I right in remembering the gaming community decided this sort of gender stuff was a bad idea a long time ago?



My thoughts exactly... the skeptic in me always kicks in the moment anyone brings up "mature" gaming, storytelling, movies, lyrics, and so on.  It's not that the subject matter can't be handled maturely, it's that handling "mature" content in a mature way is rarely interesting to anyone who wants to push those boundaries.




 Considering I recently read an article about a marathon runner who not only ran a marathon while pregnant but ran it the week she was due, I'm pretty damn sure any discussion about "realism" involving huge mechanical penalties to the drow's character is pointless.

Particularly since it's a freaking elf who in no way is restricted to "realistic" human biological norms.

 From a "realism" standpoint...

 - Morning sickness : First, this is under the assumption that elves even get morning sickness... The word "morning" may be a clue that this isn't an all-the-time thing. While the cleric is praying and the wizard reading his spellbook, the drow is puking. If it comes up at all during the day, this is a roleplaying opportunity, full stop. Problem solved.

 - Movement/Ability penalties : See above mention of professional athlete. Not to mention, unless the character is a frontline melee combatant, most of those physical penalties would be almost irrelevant anyway.

 - Mood swings : Seriously? Last I checked, pregnancy wasn't classified as a mental illness. And again, who says elves have mood swings? ROLEPLAYING OPPORTUNITY

 The one thing that actually does need to be adressed from the "realism" point of view is the fact that the character's previous armor and clothing probably won't fit her through the entire pregnancy.

Magic armor has traditionally changed size to fit the wearer, or can be handwaved by a simple use of 4E's Enchant Magic Item spell.
Unless the character wants to roleplay the fact that her clothes no longer fit and she needs to buy new ones, she's either of sufficient level that buying anything short of the queen's coronation gown rarely involves much more than looking under the couch cushions for spare change or a simple spell could be written for the purpose if one doesn't already exist - in fact, I think there actually was a minor spell back in 3.5 that could do that, if it wasn't just covered under the text of the Mending spell.

  As Grimli said, try asking the player how they'd like to handle the situation.






Excellent post, Mad_Jack!

And furthermore, in a world where adventurers guzzle healing potions like soda-pop, I think it's safe to hand-wave a lot of the (real or unfairly stereotyped)  physical awkwardness of pregnancy as something that can easily be relieved by magical potions behind the scenes... unless the Player really wants to inflict role-playing restrictions and penalties on his/her own character, in which case the player should be welcome to do so through role-playing on his/her own initiative, no DM-applied mechanical penalties required.  (This is, after all, supposed to be a "mature" group - if that is the case, they can be trusted to handle the dramatic elements through mature role-playing, without DMs micro-managing the situation with artificial modifiers and so on!)

I'll add a +1 to Grimli and Mad_Jack:  the Player who wants to role-play a pregnant character should be the first person you go to to ask about how to handle the situation.  This is, after all, his character's story.  And maybe this player WANTS to play every dated sit-com stereotype of pregnancy to the hilt, up to and maybe including rolling against willpower to resist the urge to demand bowls of ice-cream with pickles... in which case it is partly your job as DM to try to encourage the player to aim a little higher, or handwave it out of the way as quickly as possible to get the game back onto a mature track, unless (Lord help us) that's what you and your group want, too, in which case you don't need any help from anyone else, you and your group have things covered.
[spoiler New DM Tips]
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  • Know your group's character sheets, and check them over carefully. You don't want surprises, but, more importantly, they are a gold mine of ideas!
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[/spoiler] The New DM's Group Horror in RPGs "This is exactly what the Leprechauns want you to believe!" - Merb101 "Broken or not, unbalanced or not, if something seems to be preventing the game from being enjoyable, something has to give: either that thing, or other aspects of the game, or your idea of what's enjoyable." - Centauri
If a character in my game would be pregnant, I'd ask the player to switch character for a couple of month In-Game!

A character like this can't quest or it will kill the baby! An orc won't mind to bash you with his axe, pregnant or not! ( He'd be even happy to kill two people instead of one! ) And if the charactert is still sane, she wouldn't endanger her baby, she would stop fighting and even do anything dangerous, like springing a trap!

For these reason, I'd ask the player to set this character aside for a while! ( Becoming a NPC or coming back, as a PC later! ) This could lead to some great hooks for adventures too! I really think this is interesting!!! ( Imagine her baby becoming a warrior too later, living on the name of her heroic mother! )

I wouldn't rule DEX, or CHA rules, I wouldn't SLOW the character for the last 3 months...I would just remove it from the game for a while. And if the player want to keep this character, it will lose the baby, being unable to do anything for a week ( I don't know ) then continue questing like before!


That's my view.
I'm playing: Abin Gadon, Halfling Bard Winston "Slurphnose", Gnome Sorcerer Pasiphaé, Minotaur Shaman Eglerion, Elf Ellyrian Reaver (Ranger) DMing: Le Trésor du Fluide (Treasure from the Fluid) Un Royaume d'une Grande Valeur (A Kingdom of Great Value) La Légende de Persitaa (Persitaa's Legend) Une Série de Petites Quêtes... (A serie of short quests) Playtesting: Caves of Chaos We're building the greatest adventure ever known to DnD players! Also playing Legend of the Five Rings and Warhammer Fantasy. Sébastien, Beloeil, Qc. I am Neutral Good and 32 years old.
Mood swings(Daily)  Choose one of the following:
Crying swing - The character gains a bonus to diplomacy in sympathy(may not work in evil society).
Anger swing - An effect similar to a barbarian rage that lasts as long as the effect it's emulating.
Happy swing - Moral bonus to resist mind altering effects.

This is where it starts to get offensive. Can we back off on the supposed mental and emotional effects? The supposed physical effects are bad enough.




Hmm, I read this as an attempt at humor....

In that line of thinking, I offer you this; 
Cravings!  And depending upon what a drow craves, that could be a real quest!

To the drow:  "You want what??  Where/how am I suppossed to get you that?"  "Oh."
Depending upon how this gets answered?  Then you get the mood swings.  Of wich I imagine "angry drow" would be the worst.
Take it up with the mods, pal.



I think this thread has a high chance of swinging into really inappropriate territory.

LOL yeah, but my group is "mature audience only", . . . this isn't the worst we've done"

Then you and I have very different definitions of the word "mature."



Who's offended, besides you?

I reported this thread and asked that it be moved to the mature gaming forum, assuming it still exists.




You don't have to post to be offended. Or to think the subject matter is inappropriate. For every one person that posts that they believe the stuff being bandied about here is inappropriate, there are likely many more who think it but don't post.
And I don't "hate" realism in fantasy. I find amusing limited thinking that leads to limited outcomes because of using reality as a crutch in fantasy. This is not the case in this thread.




Seriously, I was just asking an honest question. Why is everyone freaking out? I KNOW that there are DnD games that get a whole lot more inappropriate than this, and as for the Drow chick, unlike most DM's who let the characters do whatever they want, the way I don't think letting characters get away with stuff like than without any consiquences is responsible as characters or as players. Which is why I want to know what kinds of penalties I should impose. It was an HONEST question, nothing more
Supposed?  Mood swings are a documented fact of pregnancy.  Please keep your facts straight and stick to the topic of conversation.  The op is not asking for your opinion on what is offensive and what isn't.  This is about helping a dm run a pregnancy in game.


Thank you very much,
I didn't intend for this post to spark such a heated debate. It was just a question for how I should handle what the dice rolled
If she has a daughter AND if the father of said daughter is Drow, you can play up the desire of the Drow to retrieve such a valuable asset. Or perhaps your hero wants her daughter to end up in Drow society? Seems like a great way to introduce a huge story arch.



true true, that's something I didn't think about
I'd still argue that taxing healing surges is the most 4e-appropriate thing you can do.  Ability score damage (Hell, ability score penalties in general, especially for races) is a thing of the past, and 4e has resoundingly left it behind.  In most ways, healing surges have become the currency of 4e mechanics.  It won't overtly cripple or handicap your player, but will effectively illustrate the toll that pregnancy has on a player.

And I'd use the disease track to show that this is a challenge that the PC can either overcome or succumb to.
Sleeping with interns on Colonial 1
I would do a few things
1 talk to the player about what they expect while expecting (lol)
2 if you need a mechanical change, 1 healing surge down per trimester (or quadmester for drow?)
3 Figure out Drow birth traditions, will she need a drow priest or do the drow judge and kill weak children?
4 maybe have the father if present change his theme if you use them to Protector (one of the first themes)
5 If the mother does not want to fight have the player play her gaurd.

Remember its not so much the child that will harm the mother but the orc that will harm the shild, play up the roleplaying parts of drow culture and the protective nature of the parents... no mater the facts of pregnancy I can tell you negitives are not fun, and exploration is.

Good luck
In the Nentir Vale, all injured creatures are required to wear a name tag!
I don't think letting characters get away with stuff like than without any consiquences is responsible as characters or as players


Wait, actually, this brings up a really good question: what, exactly, is the player "getting away with"?  Rather than wait for a reply, I might put forth that the mindset that the player is getting away with something or trying to avoid consequences might be a symptom of a larger issue.  

That said, I'm with Grimli and Mad_Jack primarily.  If a mechanic is required, I like gaiusbaltar's.  

I just want to reinforce that every pregnancy is very, very, very different.  Morning sickness is a misnomer in that it's in no way restricted to mornings, can happen at any time, or not at all for some pregnancies (including two pregnancies for the same woman).  Frankly, the only commonality between all pregnancies (in the context of hindering a player character) is that they bear the weight of the baby and its support system (about twice the weight of the baby, as a vaguely-accurate-but-in-no-way-scientific estimate).  If you're desperate for a mechanic, simply decrease the character's encumbrance by that weight and let the existing mechanics dictate what she can and cannot do.  :D

Mood swings should be off the table, mechanically.  We don't have mechanics for puberty or menopause or falling in love or sexual maturity (well, there's a book somewhere I'm sure...), all of which represent similar degrees of hormonal changes.  All "mood-related" decisions (and frankly, all of these decisions) should be entirely within the player's purview.