Dwarven Low-Light Vision

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The Dwarven Fighter Character Sheets says:

"Low-light vision: If there is no light within 30 feet of you, you treat shadows in that radius as normal light, and you treat darkness in that radius as shadows."

Does that mean a blanket thirty feet from said dwarf or from light itself?
The Dwarven Fighter Character Sheets says:

"Low-light vision: If there is no light within 30 feet of you, you treat shadows in that radius as normal light, and you treat darkness in that radius as shadows."

Does that mean a blanket thirty feet from said dwarf or from light itself?



Sounds like from the Dwarf to me.  "within 30 feet of you"
It's an aura 30 feet away from the dwarves position. That means you shouldn't make bonfires as Dwarves because it makes it harder to see at night?
It's an aura 30 feet away from the dwarves position. That means you shouldn't make bonfires as Dwarves because it makes it harder to see at night?


A bonfire's probably going to light up a larger area than a 30 foot radius.

I think the new twist on low-light vision is clever.  It equalizes the party when you've got torches out, and it makes sense.
I despise equality. The lighting of Dwarven holds makes no sense.
I despise equality. The lighting of Dwarven holds makes no sense.


That dwarven holds are lighted makes no sense, or how dwarven holds are lighted makes no sense?  And in either case, why not?  Even in prior editions dwarves with darkvision haven't been able to see more than 60 feet, and that's not really very far.
Gramatically, the text says that if you are within 30 feet of bright light, then you can't see dark areas as dim.

This would imply that the pupils are too open and you can't see well.

The other way of reading it, which makes more sense in the game world as we have normally experienced it, is that in an area that is brightly lit, any dark areas are still very dark for you, and you don't see them as just dim spots.    This means that if a bugbear is hiding in the shadows in a well lit room, that he is completely hidden because those shadows are really dark and hard to see.

The difference between these two readings:  Reading 1: In the scenario of the bugbear hiding in a dark shadow in a bright room, is that if the Dwarf steps 40 feet away from the lightsource, even though the rest of the room is bright, and that shadow is really dark compared to the rest of the room, the Dwarf can more easily spot the bugbear than a human.  Reading 2: No matter how far away the dwarf gets, the bugbear will be in darkness, because the rest of the room is too bright to see darkness as dim lighting.


I can't tell which is correct, but I will say that I miss infravision  
Low light vision in Dwarves and Elves is an interesting topic.

I also wonder how a condition like albinism would affect a dwarf's low light vision? Would it give the dwarf a hereditary bonus on his low light vision or his darkvision?

In real life, complete hereditary albinism can adversely affect vision when the person is in normal light or bright daylight, because the irises and retinas lack sufficient melanin to protect the eyes and facilitate normal sight.  An albino dwarf, halfling or elf may not have his/her darkvision or low light vision affected, but his/her ability to see in bright daylight would be adversely affected. I would think that albinism or a condition like it would give a dwarf, halfling, or elf at least a -1 or -2 hereditary penalty on all feats or skills that involve vision in daylight.

Since albinism affects all mammalian species, would it affect all PC races as well as humans? I would think that albinism could be included as a rare to common hereditary trait or condition that affects all humanoids no matter what their race or subrace is.
We had some issues with low light vision in our game this weekend. Bullseye lantern sends out a cone of light heading due east. Dwarf is a square behind it staring due west and can't see anything in the pure darkness. Seemed odd.

Also, if a light has a 20 foot radius for bright light, does this all mean the dwarf has to be 50 feet away from the source of the light? Or 30 feet from the source of the light? 
We had some issues with low light vision in our game this weekend. Bullseye lantern sends out a cone of light heading due east. Dwarf is a square behind it staring due west and can't see anything in the pure darkness. Seemed odd.

Also, if a light has a 20 foot radius for bright light, does this all mean the dwarf has to be 50 feet away from the source of the light? Or 30 feet from the source of the light? 


Good issues to raise.  These are actually things that seem like they need to be clarified.
Okay, I was aching to give an extension of the light sources not the dwarfself.
Okay, I was aching to give an extension of the light sources not the dwarfself.
The Dwarven Fighter Character Sheets says:

"Low-light vision: If there is no light within 30 feet of you, you treat shadows in that radius as normal light, and you treat darkness in that radius as shadows."

Does that mean a blanket thirty feet from said dwarf or from light itself?

The quote would seem to imply that Low-light vision is not applicable if there is a any light within 30' feet of the character; not just any light source within 30', any light at all. This makes some sense; I have pretty good night vision myself, but the closer I am to any light, the less effective I can "see in the dark".


Gramatically, the text says that if you are within 30 feet of bright light, then you can't see dark areas as dim.

This would imply that the pupils are too open and you can't see well.

The other way of reading it, which makes more sense in the game world as we have normally experienced it, is that in an area that is brightly lit, any dark areas are still very dark for you, and you don't see them as just dim spots.    This means that if a bugbear is hiding in the shadows in a well lit room, that he is completely hidden because those shadows are really dark and hard to see.

The difference between these two readings:  Reading 1: In the scenario of the bugbear hiding in a dark shadow in a bright room, is that if the Dwarf steps 40 feet away from the lightsource, even though the rest of the room is bright, and that shadow is really dark compared to the rest of the room, the Dwarf can more easily spot the bugbear than a human.  Reading 2: No matter how far away the dwarf gets, the bugbear will be in darkness, because the rest of the room is too bright to see darkness as dim lighting.


I can't tell which is correct, but I will say that I miss infravision  

I would say the dwarf would have to step at least 30' away from any light, not just the light source, to regain his low-light vision; and even then, he would have to face away from any light to use the low-light vision to any advantage.


We had some issues with low light vision in our game this weekend. Bullseye lantern sends out a cone of light heading due east. Dwarf is a square behind it staring due west and can't see anything in the pure darkness. Seemed odd.

Also, if a light has a 20 foot radius for bright light, does this all mean the dwarf has to be 50 feet away from the source of the light? Or 30 feet from the source of the light? 

See my response to the OP, at the beginning of this post; even looking the other way doesn't negate visible light behind you.

I don't know why, but the last few times I looked at this, I missed the words "in that radius", and focused on the "within 30 feet of you part".


The meaning of the text is much more clear to me.

You can see 30 feet in front of you.  If those 30 feet in front of you are dark, you see them as shadows, if they are shadows you see them as bright light, if there is light,  you see it as light. If there are shadows or darkness within the well lit area, then those are normal shadows and darkness to you.

Other factors, such as there being bright light all around, will allow you to see more than 30 feet in front of you.

In front of you changes, into a circle, since there are no "facing rules"