A Few Suggestions

I ran our first playtest session 05-27.  Here are a few things that cropped up.

1. Invisible creatures should not cast a shadow.  This led to a minor rules argument in game, where the player consensus was that leaving footprints and your footsteps making noise were fine.

2. Improvised Melee Weapons should allow STR bonus on attack rolls and Improvised Ranged Weapons should allow DEX bonus on attack rolls.  The players felt that innovative use of the environment should be rewarded and not made less effective than standard attacks.

3. Improvised Weapons should do 1d4 or 1d6 instead of 1d8 or 1d10.  The players felt this would limit PC's from discarding their standard weapons as a general rule to use more entertaining ones.

4. Clerics should also have access to Rituals (and Ritual Component Pouches.)  The players felt that Rituals were very useful if you prepared the wrong spells for an adventure and that all spellcasters should have that option.

5. Intoxicated Spellcasters should have to make Concentration Checks even on Orisons and Cantrips.  The players discovered that the Wizard could become Intoxicated and bypass Disadvantage by casting only Cantrips and never missing.  On the plus side, it was funy to imagine the wizard aiming wildly when drunk and the missiles homing in from crazy angles

In closing, this iteration looks really nice.  I think it is a good step in the direction of ending the 'Edition Wars.'  I think the trick will be getting people form different camps to let go of their favorite mechanics by integrating most of them into the final ruleset.
Clerics can't "prepare the wrong spells". They prepare spells like the Sorcerer in 3.x did. Under Preparing Spells on the character sheet, the cleric prepares every spell they have access to. But under Casting a Spell, it states that the Cleric choses a prepared spell and uses a spell slot of that level or lower to cast it. So that's not an issue.

That stated, I agree that clerics should have access to rituals as well, but they should be cleric-themed rituals. They should revolve around healing, divinations, and things associated with their deity. Just like with spell choices, clerics should have access to rituals that are both unique and more limited in scope than wizards.
Under Spells Known/Prepared on Page One of the Pelorite Cleric it shows the spells cure light wounds, spiritual hammer, and searing light.  By the current ruleset these are the only 3 spells a Pelorite Cleric has access to at Level One.

Under Spell Preparation on Page 2 (of the same character sheet) it says 'Each day, after a long rest, you PREPARE cure light wounds, spiritual hammer, and searing light. Preparing these spells takes 1 minute per spell level for each spell you PREPARE.

Under Casting a Spell the text reads : You can cast one of your PREPARED spells using a spell slot of its level or HIGHER (not lower.) After you cast that spell, you lose the use of that slot until after your PREPARE spells again.

What that means is that at 3rd Level you would have sunburst(2nd Level-Probably your Domain Spell), shield of faith(1st Level), silence(2nd Level), cure light wounds(1st Level), spiritual hammer(1st Level), and searing light(1st Level) prepared.  You could swap out either silence or sunburst to cast a single shield of faith, cure light wounds, spiritual hammer, or searing light (as long as you still had one copy of the chosen spell currently prepared (not already cast.))

However, I think it would be interesting to have Clerics cast their 'Prayers (instead of 'Spells') and Orisons' like Sorcerers in 3.0/3.5.  It would help give them a unique flavor and more versatility.

The way I read the Clerics spell casting is like this:


The spells the cleric “prepares” in the morning are like a sorcerers spells known, to relate it to 3.5, so a Cleric may cast any combination of their prepared spell in his available spell slots for that day. So he could cast the same spell twice or two spells once. The next day he could “prepare” a completely different set of spells and follow the same rules.


This is the way I understand what was written, and seems to be the consensus on the forums.

Many posters seem to be holding on to 'Clerics Cast Like Sorcerers' idea no matter what logic I employ to the contrary.  I do not want to argue the point at length, so all I can say is that I feel that adhernets of that rules interpretation might want to ask themselves if they hold to that interpretation becasue they want it to be true, or becasue it is written that way.
Many posters seem to be holding on to 'Clerics Cast Like Sorcerers' idea no matter what logic I employ to the contrary.  I do not want to argue the point at length, so all I can say is that I feel that adhernets of that rules interpretation might want to ask themselves if they hold to that interpretation becasue they want it to be true, or becasue it is written that way.


Mearls confirmed they're like sorcerers in this regard. 
I agree with the intoxicated spellcasters and concenmtration checks.

As for the priest spellcasting, compare the wording on the wizard sheet and the cleric sheet; the wizard sheet has a lot of word about how, when he casts a spell, that that instance of the spell dissappeasr from his mind.

I guess all weapons still have a proficiency bonus that the improvised weapons lack, as such the incentive to use improvised over "normal" weapons is less. I do think that the damage dice should be appropriate to what is wielded, I will believe some heavy metal equipment doing 1d8 damage but a wielding a checken should be more like 1d4. DM's should set the damage dice.
Many posters seem to be holding on to 'Clerics Cast Like Sorcerers' idea no matter what logic I employ to the contrary.  I do not want to argue the point at length, so all I can say is that I feel that adhernets of that rules interpretation might want to ask themselves if they hold to that interpretation becasue they want it to be true, or becasue it is written that way.


Mearls confirmed they're like sorcerers in this regard. 



Where did he indicate this?
He said as such in this article.

I pasted the needed lines here.


  Finally, we introduced a new mechanic for cleric spell preparation. Right now, clerics function similar to 3E's sorcerer class with one big exception. A cleric picks spells to prepare, but can then cast any of those spells as long as he or she has an available spell slot to expend. The slot must be the spell's level or higher. We wanted to make cleric magic feel different from the wizard's spells, while also making it easy to use healing spells as needed.

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If the idea is to allow for healing spells to be more easily cast during combat, why not allow Clerics to swap out any prepared spell for a healing spell of the same level or lower instead of requiring them to have one copy of that spell prepared?
If the idea is to allow for healing spells to be more easily cast during combat, why not allow Clerics to swap out any prepared spell for a healing spell of the same level or lower instead of requiring them to have one copy of that spell prepared?


Because there are now multiple "healing spells". So far we've seen Cure Light Wounds and Healing Word. Also, it allows Clerics more flexibility in spellcasting and allows them to feel different.

And please re-read the "Preparing Spells" and "Casting a Spell" sections of the Cleric character sheet. I can't explain it any more without literally re-typing the rules as written which is against the playtest agreement. The cleric prepares every single spell he or she knows at the start of the day. The cleric, which casting a spell, uses one of his or her spell slots that is an equal or higher level to the spell cast. Just like Sorcerers in 3.X.
I don't think they prepare 'every single spell' - that could really slow down the game, choosing spells on the fly.  I thought the cleric revised a number of spells from their known spell list (which will presumably be based on a list of classic spells and a list based on their god's portfolio).  They can then cast their spells in any combination (including using low level spells in higher level slots).  They are different from 3e clerics because (hopefully) their overall spell list will be smaller and they are different from 3e sorcerers because they will be able to adjust their spells each day.
In the wizard spell preparation description it says a spell can be memorized more than once.  it doesn't say that in the cleric's description.
2. Improvised Melee Weapons should allow STR bonus on attack rolls and Improvised Ranged Weapons should allow DEX bonus on attack rolls.  The players felt that innovative use of the environment should be rewarded and not made less effective than standard attacks.

3. Improvised Weapons should do 1d4 or 1d6 instead of 1d8 or 1d10.  The players felt this would limit PC's from discarding their standard weapons as a general rule to use more entertaining ones.

I'm pretty sure Improvised Weapons already allow for Str/Dex mods to be added to their damage--it's the +2 from being proficient in their use that they don't receive.
In the wizard spell preparation description it says a spell can be memorized more than once.  it doesn't say that in the cleric's description.


Because they don't need to. They prepare all their spells and then they choose which spell to cast in each spell slot. See my post above for a more detailed explanation.
  Finally, we introduced a new mechanic for cleric spell preparation. Right now, clerics function similar to 3E's sorcerer class with one big exception. A cleric picks spells to prepare, but can then cast any of those spells as long as he or she has an available spell slot to expend.

Emphasis mine.

This makes them like 3e's Spirit Shaman, not like the sorcerer.  I wish he'd used that comparison.

However, in the playtest, since it's decided for us what spells the clerics have prepared, they're functionally identical to sorcerers.

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  Finally, we introduced a new mechanic for cleric spell preparation. Right now, clerics function similar to 3E's sorcerer class with one big exception. A cleric picks spells to prepare, but can then cast any of those spells as long as he or she has an available spell slot to expend.

Emphasis mine.

This makes them like 3e's Spirit Shaman, not like the sorcerer.  I wish he'd used that comparison.

However, in the playtest, since it's decided for us what spells the clerics have prepared, they're functionally identical to sorcerers.



Probably because Spirit Shaman wasn't a core class and people like me (who stuck with the core classes through 3rd/3.5) have no earthly idea how they cast spells.