I think all of us are forgetting to ask the most important question of all...

Will there be warforged?!
I know this is in poor taste but...“4th edition - bad enough to kill Gary Gygax.”
Of course there will. If you're asking if they'll be in the first player handbook, chances are small, I think. But if your question is whether they'll be a playable race again, I think you can be very much certain of that. They'll likely release an update to the Eberron campaign setting within the first year or two with a playable race of the warforged, and maybe already include it in the first monster manual or in Dungeon/Dragon earlier. Since warforged have become so iconic for D&D, I think there can be no serious doubt about that.
Good. Eberron is by far my abosolute favorite D&D setting. They're not going to advance the meta-plot right? It'd be awful if they did to it what's happened to Forgotten Realms (TM)
I know this is in poor taste but...“4th edition - bad enough to kill Gary Gygax.”
I doubt it.

There's probably going to be an epic disaster that will fundamentally change the nature of magic. All warforges will die in the process. Since then, Eberron has become a low magic setting. Oh and Xen'drik doesn't exist anymore because it blew up and was replaced with a new continent with dogborns (hairy humoids with a puppy's face) that were introduced in the PHB1 to make 11 year old girl gamers happy.

I hope they learned their lesson with the Forgotten Realms. The goal of D&D Next is to reconnect with all D&D fans. That seems incompatible with a campaign reset but you never know...
I doubt it.

There's probably going to be an epic disaster that will fundamentally change the nature of magic. All warforges will die in the process. Since then, Eberron has become a low magic setting. Oh and Xen'drik doesn't exist anymore because it blew up and was replaced with a new continent with dogborns (hairy humoids with a puppy's face) that were introduced in the PHB1 to make 11 year old girl gamers happy.

I hope they learned their lesson with the Forgotten Realms. The goal of D&D Next is to reconnect with all D&D fans. That seems incompatible with a campaign reset but you never know...

Most of that post made me very sad.
I know this is in poor taste but...“4th edition - bad enough to kill Gary Gygax.”
I hope they handle settings the same way that they're handling the mechanical design of the game - figure out what really makes the setting what it is, make sure that that's big and bold and front and center, and work from there. I know that whatever they do with certain history and major event decisions aren't going to make -everyone- happy; there's always going to be some people who are unhappy if Lord Whoever is dead and some people who are unhappy if he's not, and consider it as integral a part of the setting as "Dark Sun is a harsh, deserty world where divine power as it is tradtionally understood is absent", but I think you can get the basics in there. I don't think the settings should be modular - too much work and confusion for too little gain - but fortunately opinion on what belongs in each setting I think are in general less varied than opinions about how the game mechanics work.

I think another benefit of focusing on the core of what makes a setting what it is is that I'd like to be able to feel like I can DM in a setting and do it justice without having the equivalent of a master's degree in its fictional history and geopolitics, particularly for players in the group that ARE that invested in the setting. I think that "this is what things are like in this setting and, most importantly, what sort of adventures the setting can help enable" is more valuable to me than timelines with two hundred events on them, and is hopefully more unifying as well.
Dwarves invented beer so they could toast to their axes. Dwarves invented axes to kill people and take their beer. Swanmay Syndrome: Despite the percentages given in the Monster Manual, in reality 100% of groups of swans contain a Swanmay, because otherwise the DM would not have put any swans in the game.
I hope they handle settings the same way that they're handling the mechanical design of the game - figure out what really makes the setting what it is, make sure that that's big and bold and front and center, and work from there. I know that whatever they do with certain history and major event decisions aren't going to make -everyone- happy; there's always going to be some people who are unhappy if Lord Whoever is dead and some people who are unhappy if he's not, and consider it as integral a part of the setting as "Dark Sun is a harsh, deserty world where divine power as it is tradtionally understood is absent", but I think you can get the basics in there. I don't think the settings should be modular - too much work and confusion for too little gain - but fortunately opinion on what belongs in each setting I think are in general less varied than opinions about how the game mechanics work.

I think another benefit of focusing on the core of what makes a setting what it is is that I'd like to be able to feel like I can DM in a setting and do it justice without having the equivalent of a master's degree in its fictional history and geopolitics, particularly for players in the group that ARE that invested in the setting. I think that "this is what things are like in this setting and, most importantly, what sort of adventures the setting can help enable" is more valuable to me than timelines with two hundred events on them, and is hopefully more unifying as well.

I don't really know what you're advocating there. Are you saying you don't want meta-plots advanced? You don't care? The feel of the setting is more important then the specifics? I'm sorry, I'm having a hard time parsing a single point out that.
I know this is in poor taste but...“4th edition - bad enough to kill Gary Gygax.”
I don't think that the question of whether warforged will exist in the game (or not) is the most important question for 5e.

The actual "most important question", in my opinion, is this: Will 5e achieve it's stated design goal of uniting the fractured fanbase and ending the edition wars? Will 5e be able to satisfy and unite both pre-4e "grognard" fans and 4e fans alike? By achieving this design goal, will the Dungeons and Dragons brand be commercially successful enough to meet Hasbro's expectations so that the brand won't eventually be shelved?

The Dungeons and Dragons brand is, in the opinion of several forum members, at a crisis point here. At this stage, there are many important things to worry about when designing 5e.

From my early read the system looks well positioned to let anything in. They have a handful of really simple switches that they flip to give a custom feel, and the rest is carried by flavor text. I think Warforged will be an easy addition and a no-brainer when they get around to Eberron. Now, if they try and put them in the core book, they'll have a nightmare on their hands.
I don't think that the question of whether warforged will exist in the game (or not) is the most important question for 5e.

The actual "most important question", in my opinion, is this: Will 5e achieve it's stated design goal of uniting the fractured fanbase and ending the edition wars? Will 5e be able to satisfy and unite both pre-4e "grognard" fans and 4e fans alike? By achieving this design goal, will the Dungeons and Dragons brand be commercially successful enough to meet Hasbro's expectations so that the brand won't eventually be shelved?

The Dungeons and Dragons brand is, in the opinion of several forum members, at a crisis point here. At this stage, there are many important things to worry about when designing 5e.


This thread had nothing to do with the question you just asked, and honestly, I hope it doesn't bring the 4ed crowd ino the fold judging from the reaction on this forums. So much rage and vitrol, I don't really want to be included in the same group as people who conducted themselves that way.
I know this is in poor taste but...“4th edition - bad enough to kill Gary Gygax.”
I don't think that the question of whether warforged will exist in the game (or not) is the most important question for 5e.

The actual "most important question", in my opinion, is this: Will 5e achieve it's stated design goal of uniting the fractured fanbase and ending the edition wars? Will 5e be able to satisfy and unite both pre-4e "grognard" fans and 4e fans alike? By achieving this design goal, will the Dungeons and Dragons brand be commercially successful enough to meet Hasbro's expectations so that the brand won't eventually be shelved?

The Dungeons and Dragons brand is, in the opinion of several forum members, at a crisis point here. At this stage, there are many important things to worry about when designing 5e.


This thread had nothing to do with the question you just asked, and honestly, I hope it doesn't bring the 4ed crowd ino the fold judging from the reaction on this forums. So much rage and vitrol, I don't really want to be included in the same group as people who conducted themselves that way.




I agree with you. And I think the developers probably will put Warforged into 5e someday. Maybe not in the core rules, but as a module.

What I would like to see in 5e are all of the spells from 1e (including wish), arctic and desert versions of the core races, and non-combat magic items like the sustaining spoon. Warforged would probably be a bonus as well.

Melwick you are a visionary.
I know this is in poor taste but...“4th edition - bad enough to kill Gary Gygax.”
I doubt it.

There's probably going to be an epic disaster that will fundamentally change the nature of magic. All warforges will die in the process. Since then, Eberron has become a low magic setting. Oh and Xen'drik doesn't exist anymore because it blew up and was replaced with a new continent with dogborns (hairy humoids with a puppy's face) that were introduced in the PHB1 to make 11 year old girl gamers happy.

I hope they learned their lesson with the Forgotten Realms. The goal of D&D Next is to reconnect with all D&D fans. That seems incompatible with a campaign reset but you never know...


Actually, in fitting with the retro themes of Next, the warforged will be replaced with 113 new varieties of Elf, including 17 subraces of robotic elves to help players recreate their old warforged, and 19 new types of "Dragon Voltron Elf" which, when they stand on each other's shoulders, replace the dragons of Argonessen.
Seriously, though, you should check out the PbP Haven. You might also like Real Adventures, IF you're cool.
Knights of W.T.F.- Silver Spur Winner
4enclave, a place where 4e fans can talk 4e in peace.
In a serious anwser, Eberron is very successful. It would be quite suprising if they didn't extend it and with it warforged (which are kind of iconic when talking about Eberron).
Actually, in fitting with the retro themes of Next, the warforged will be replaced with 113 new varieties of Elf, including 17 subraces of robotic elves to help players recreate their old warforged, and 19 new types of "Dragon Voltron Elf" which, when they stand on each other's shoulders, replace the dragons of Argonessen.



Pash, you're a genius! This is simple and elegant.
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