D&D Next Dynamic Play

One of the best aspects of 4e was the dynamics of combat. Sure a typical encounter could last over an hour, but it was alive with action! I loved the movement in combat. Forced movement, utilities that allowed my character to move extra squares (hexes would be better), and movement as part of certain powers. 

Just after I finished my first read-through of the playtest packet, my thought was that D&D Next looks a lot like 3.5 which, is not necessarily a bad thing. But its not exactly a good thing either. Combat in 3.5 was very static especially at higher levels. Each character would find a good spot to stand, and there they would remain until the monsters were pounded into goo paste. There was no movement no dynamic energy to the combat.

Dynamic action is what made my 4e combat encounters come to life. I don't see a place for powers in D&D Next (thank Pelor), but I do hope the designers work on some aspect of keeping combat from being a mundane hack-n-slash encounter every time.

How have y'all percieved movement in D&D Next and is there a place for dynamic movement combat for the next iteration? Or, does standing in one spot and hacking at a monster for the duration of the encounter sound more appealing? 


 
I'll try the game within six hours and then I'll can tell you better, but for now I really don't understand your preoccupation.
Combat and movement in D&D Next isn't anything like 3.5
Free movement with attacks even in between and no Opportunity Attacks. It's a lot better and faster for me.
Again, I'll play and I'll tell you but just per se I think it's a huge difference with 3.5
One of the best aspects of 4e was the dynamics of combat. Sure a typical encounter could last over an hour, but it was alive with action! I loved the movement in combat. Forced movement, utilities that allowed my character to move extra squares (hexes would be better), and movement as part of certain powers. 

Just after I finished my first read-through of the playtest packet, my thought was that D&D Next looks a lot like 3.5 which, is not necessarily a bad thing. But its not exactly a good thing either. Combat in 3.5 was very static especially at higher levels. Each character would find a good spot to stand, and there they would remain until the monsters were pounded into goo paste. There was no movement no dynamic energy to the combat.

Dynamic action is what made my 4e combat encounters come to life. I don't see a place for powers in D&D Next (thank Pelor), but I do hope the designers work on some aspect of keeping combat from being a mundane hack-n-slash encounter every time.

How have y'all percieved movement in D&D Next and is there a place for dynamic movement combat for the next iteration? Or, does standing in one spot and hacking at a monster for the duration of the encounter sound more appealing? 


 



Movement among a battlefeild can still be imagined without a grid. While personally, im glad to see grid requirements irradicated so far, i can see why one would want one. From what weve heard, ide suppose it would be a module later added on.

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I think you can still have the option of tactical battles, but I've always thought that not every battle needs to be that complicated.  If you need a longer fight so you can fit in interesting terrain and maneuvers, it's pretty easy to scale up the monsters and give them some extra movement abilities.  I only really want this complexity once in a while (perhaps even once an adventure) though.
One of the best aspects of 4e was the dynamics of combat. Sure a typical encounter could last over an hour, but it was alive with action! I loved the movement in combat. Forced movement, utilities that allowed my character to move extra squares (hexes would be better), and movement as part of certain powers. 

Just after I finished my first read-through of the playtest packet, my thought was that D&D Next looks a lot like 3.5 which, is not necessarily a bad thing. But its not exactly a good thing either. Combat in 3.5 was very static especially at higher levels. Each character would find a good spot to stand, and there they would remain until the monsters were pounded into goo paste. There was no movement no dynamic energy to the combat.

Dynamic action is what made my 4e combat encounters come to life. I don't see a place for powers in D&D Next (thank Pelor), but I do hope the designers work on some aspect of keeping combat from being a mundane hack-n-slash encounter every time.

How have y'all percieved movement in D&D Next and is there a place for dynamic movement combat for the next iteration? Or, does standing in one spot and hacking at a monster for the duration of the encounter sound more appealing? 


 



Movement among a battlefeild can still be imagined without a grid. While personally, im glad to see grid requirements irradicated so far, i can see why one would want one. From what weve heard, ide suppose it would be a module later added on.


If I remember the text from the packet, a character can break up his or her movement before or after the action, not between. But if I could, that certainly would put a level of dynamic action to the encounter.

If I could move ten feet, attack, move five more feet, open a door, move inside, close the door, and pull out a potion...all in one turn, then maybe there is some cool movement. But I didn't read the movement rule that way.
If I could move ten feet, attack, move five more feet, open a door, move inside, close the door, and pull out a potion...all in one turn, then maybe there is some cool movement. But I didn't read the movement rule that way.



From the way I've read the rules, that would probably be allowable.  Opening a door and pulling out an item are non-actions I believe so they can happen whenever.  The movement and attack are really the only parts governed, so the rest can happen during the movement.
If I could move ten feet, attack, move five more feet, open a door, move inside, close the door, and pull out a potion...all in one turn, then maybe there is some cool movement. But I didn't read the movement rule that way.



From the way I've read the rules, that would probably be allowable.  Opening a door and pulling out an item are non-actions I believe so they can happen whenever.  The movement and attack are really the only parts governed, so the rest can happen during the movement.



Yeah, according to the rules, something like this is definitely allowed. However, I don't think any DM would actually be ok with letting their players do this. Even though they didn't specify that there should be a limit to how many free actions you can take, common sense says that stringing together a half dozen of them is going to take longer than 6 seconds. As a DM, I fully intend to limit the number of free actions a character can take during their turn. There won't be a hard and fast rule (i.e., if you come up with 6 different free actions that you can do all at once, go for it), but using common sense I'll tell them how many of their proposed actions they can actually complete. 

Of course, if a player thinks they can attack while moving, opening a door, and pulling out a potion, you could call for something like a dexterity check to make it more interesting. Maybe he tries to do it, but screws up and sticks his sword through the door and throws the potion in the monster's face. It could be kind of fun, actually.

Yeah, according to the rules, something like this is definitely allowed. However, I don't think any DM would actually be ok with letting their players do this. Even though they didn't specify that there should be a limit to how many free actions you can take, common sense says that stringing together a half dozen of them is going to take longer than 6 seconds. As a DM, I fully intend to limit the number of free actions a character can take during their turn. There won't be a hard and fast rule (i.e., if you come up with 6 different free actions that you can do all at once, go for it), but using common sense I'll tell them how many of their proposed actions they can actually complete. 

Of course, if a player thinks they can attack while moving, opening a door, and pulling out a potion, you could call for something like a dexterity check to make it more interesting. Maybe he tries to do it, but screws up and sticks his sword through the door and throws the potion in the monster's face. It could be kind of fun, actually.



Well, personally I would probably allow it.  Even if you just let them open the door and run through they can always pull the potion out at the same time they drink it next round since only drinking the potion is an action.  It all comes out in the wash.
Ill just repeat my self from the topic: Combat is faster but at the trade off of boring? (community.wizards.com/go/thread/view/758...)

4th edition combat was moving at a relative quick pace in the early levels. As soons as it became 13+ level the combat flow started to slow down.

My playgroup could sometimes use between 30-60min at every encounter. Most of the times used on Opportunity attacks, interrupts etc. 

I do/did really like the combat of 4th, but sometimes it felt so rigid and clunky. 

I really like the new fast paced combat style, that also appeals to the inovative and creative sides oof combat, that 4th edition didnt. 

That said, it might not be that the playtests combat system at the moment is very exciting, but i can see the potential. If it keeps the pace, and then add more options later, then I think this is going to be the best combat system so far.