Rules depending on each other - e.g. Flanking

The question has come up while playtesting under which positional conditions a character, especially the rogue, would have an advantage from "flanking" or "being behind" an enemy. And I realized that it would be wrong to rule that like in 4th edition, because the movement rules are so different.

In 4th edition you get combat advantage if you and an ally stand on opposing squares of an enemy. But it isn't all that easy to get there, because you need to go a wide way around the enemy to avoid opportunity attacks. And in a fight with the players fighting several monsters, you can get in a sandwich situation where the player who is flanking an enemy is then flanked by that enemy and another one.

Now if I as a DM would rule that my rogue could get "flanking" advantage and thus his sneak attack from standing on the other side of an enemy than an ally, the rogue would get that advantage with nearly every attack. There are no opportunity attacks, so he can far more easily move past and behind the enemy. And movement is split, so he can move back after his attack and not get flanked himself.

I think rules depend on each other. The less restrictive combat movement rules of D&D Next make it easier for a combatant to stand wherever he likes. And the "advantage" rules in D&D Next give a bigger bonus to "to hit" than the 4E combat advantage. Thus in consequence giving "advantage" for clever positioning in combat would be overpowered in my opinion. 
Not sure it is you point but I think this kind of falls in the 'facing' direction being discussed here: 

community.wizards.com/dndnext/go/thread/...

I know your general point is that rules build on each other. However, as there have been rules for flanking or even which way monsters are facing in a couple of editions, and if there are in this edition I missed it, I think this particular one is moot.

p.s. Feel free to correct me on this. Flanking rules are a little fuzzy for me.
The rogue has twice the sneak attack damage and add another 3+ points from his finess dex based damage on top of that so he definitely is not supposed to sneak attack every round. He also has the ranged option of 4th edition it seems.

It is an action to stealth and that will most likely be the most common way to get advantage. If it is a ranged attack and he misses he will most likely stay stealthed as well, so this means that out of every 8 rounds you will have somthing´like this - (Start stealthed) -sneak hit, Stealth, sneak hit, stealth, miss, sneak hit, stealth, sneak hit.

That series would yield 50% successful sneak attacks and that seems more than fair. Sure you can get an extra advantage here and there for free, but you can also fail your stealth check. But there should be way more hits than misses with advantage and a miss is only a half miss, since your often keep stealthed at least.

I like this rule. It makes a Slayer fighter very different from a rogue sneaker. One shaves down HP every round the other runs around spending whole rounds just hiding and setting up an attack and still manage to do a fair amount of damage when it is all over.          
The rogue has twice the sneak attack damage and add another 3+ points from his finess dex based damage on top of that so he definitely is not supposed to sneak attack every round. He also has the ranged option of 4th edition it seems.

It is an action to stealth and that will most likely be the most common way to get advantage. If it is a ranged attack and he misses he will most likely stay stealthed as well, so this means that out of every 8 rounds you will have somthing´like this - (Start stealthed) -sneak hit, Stealth, sneak hit, stealth, miss, sneak hit, stealth, sneak hit.

That series would yield 50% successful sneak attacks and that seems more than fair. Sure you can get an extra advantage here and there for free, but you can also fail your stealth check. But there should be way more hits than misses with advantage and a miss is only a half miss, since your often keep stealthed at least.

I like this rule. It makes a Slayer fighter very different from a rogue sneaker. One shaves down HP every round the other runs around spending whole rounds just hiding and setting up an attack and still manage to do a fair amount of damage when it is all over.          



This is pretty much how I assumed rogues would work to optimize their sneak attack, and thus damage output. It seems to me a bit arbitrary thought, and like something a niche character would do rather then the majority of rogues. We're going to have to see what sort of rogue options there are beyond the halfling thief. Perhaps an aforementioned "Backstab" mechanic will be an option, and at that point allow for a flanking situation. As-is there doesn't seem to be any positioning effects whatsoever in the playtest.