To WOTC: Make this a ONE core rule book when it is published.

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I'm loving the playtest so far, just please put everything in one book for the basic game. I can see how this can easily be expanded with the "modules", but want to be able to pick up everything I need in one hardback. Charge $50 dollars for it and load it with monsters, but just make it ONE book to buy in please. A box set including dice would also work for me. 
I want there to be so much stuff that it can't fit in a single 240-page book (and I don't want a book too much thicker than that).

I want a monster book with all the classic monsters, all the non-classic monsters, all the new monsters, all the setting-speficic monsters from all the settings, normal and monstrous animals, rules for creating and modifying monsters, and monster-as-character rules for all monstrous races that could possibly have class levels.

I want a player book with "enough" (i.e., as many as physically possible) spells, combat tricks, and psionic powers. I want a dozen classes, a dozen races, and dozens more backgrounds and themes. I want simple options and complex options. I want to be able to make Drizzt and Aragorn (but usually not Drizzt). I want to be able to make my Tiefling Necromancer and her Dragonborn Warlord friends so we can continue our current campaign seamlessly.

I want a DM book with real (prosumer) advice and guidelines for designing campaign settings, adventures, and dungeons. I want a giant encyclopedia of rules modules, covering everything from 1e to 4e, sandbox to railroad, combat-as-war to combat-as-sport, and everything in between. I want in the DMG an explanation for every rule in the PHB, why they did it that way, and some suggestions to change it.

I also want a good starter box with a simplified version of all this, maybe without so many options (plus dice, character sheets, minis), at a lower price point. I think that's the product you want.
I would like something like the Pathfinder corebook with monsters included. All you need to play. Many of the the things you listed seem like they would fall into the "modular" aspects of 5e. More than the core classes and races would be more than necessary. I would be open to a few of the newer races being included as core races. Dragonborn seem to have become a staple from 4e now. I'm open to Tieflings, Warforged, Avengers, Shamans, Artificiers, and other races and classes in "modules" but not in a core book. Maybe a really basic mass combat system would work in the core rules but nothing elaborate. Enough monsters to take you up to 10th level and creation rules. 

I'm all for the extras you speak of but they just don't need to be in the basic rules. After a few play tests I can already see how options can easily be dropped into these rules. I want to be able to choose to opt in for these extra rules and not have them taking up space in a basic book. Also I don't want to have to get 3 separate books to run the basic game. The 4e DMG was pretty much useless except for about 6 pages of it. If they go the three book route I won't be buying this. Like I stated in my first post I am open to a box set if it can take me through level 10 and is compatible with the "modules". 

I felt seriously burned by 4e after I bought 15 different hardbacks that I could have distilled down to about 3.

Also I don't need hardbacks for everything. Flimsy paperbacks are fine. Trade sized editions are great. I don't feel as bad when they start to fall apart from use.
I would love it if WOTC would start publishing PDFs but that probably won't happen.
I agree with a core book to handle the game. Give us the basics to play in one book. I don't want anything massive though. Agree with a 240 page book. Give us everything we need to play and run in one book. Then put out smaller softcover books. Make it economical for people in a time where economical games are needed.
I would like something like the Pathfinder corebook with monsters included. All you need to play. Many of the the things you listed seem like they would fall into the "modular" aspects of 5e. More than the core classes and races would be more than necessary. I would be open to a few of the newer races being included as core races. Dragonborn seem to have become a staple from 4e now. I'm open to Tieflings, Warforged, Avengers, Shamans, Artificiers, and other races and classes in "modules" but not in a core book. Maybe a really basic mass combat system would work in the core rules but nothing elaborate. Enough monsters to take you up to 10th level and creation rules. 

I'm all for the extras you speak of but they just don't need to be in the basic rules. After a few play tests I can already see how options can easily be dropped into these rules. I want to be able to choose to opt in for these extra rules and not have them taking up space in a basic book. Also I don't want to have to get 3 separate books to run the basic game. The 4e DMG was pretty much useless except for about 6 pages of it. If they go the three book route I won't be buying this. Like I stated in my first post I am open to a box set if it can take me through level 10 and is compatible with the "modules". 

I felt seriously burned by 4e after I bought 15 different hardbacks that I could have distilled down to about 3.

Also I don't need hardbacks for everything. Flimsy paperbacks are fine. Trade sized editions are great. I don't feel as bad when they start to fall apart from use.
I would love it if WOTC would start publishing PDFs but that probably won't happen.



This says everything I want to say even bring back pdf editions. I think games go over better when players and refs can buy one back and add on others as they see fit for their groups.
Make it economical for people in a time where economical games are needed.


Amen to that! Lots of Other game companies get this. Lets hope WOTC has learned some lessons.  I've been tempted by the Pathfinder core book($50) but haven't bought it due to the lack of monsters. If they put out a core set inlcuding the monsters they would already have a leg up on Pathfinder. The other major games right now are the WH40k ones being put out by FFG. Each of the core books($50) for the various games has all you need to start playing. The M&M heroes handbook($35) has all you need to play. Same goes for that new Marvel Heroic game($20) that is getting so much buzz. Savage Worlds core rules $10!

I could go on.  


This says everything I want to say even bring back pdf editions. I think games go over better when players and refs can buy one back and add on others as they see fit for their groups.


I agree. I see one of my players wanting more skills and building stuff rules. A book covering major aspects of these would be welcome.

I would much prefer the classic triple book set of Player's Handbook, DMG, and Monster Manual. Players only need the one book, but a DM would of course need the other two as well. I wouldn't mind spending 90-100 dollars on three hard back books if the game system lasts longer than 4e did. I'll get plenty of mileage out of it.
I'd prefer a bare bones collection of the rules, a collection of some 200 monsters, magic items, terrain options and a suite of races, classes, backgrounds and themes in addition to a spell list no less than 400 entries long.  I know full well that if you dig Wizards, you'll find me all my spells.  And I want a ritual associated with no fewer than 75% of those spells.

In order to simplify th eprocess of converting my game world, I demand the follwoing:
THE GUIDE FOR MAKING NEW MONSTERS
SPELL DESIGN GUIDELINES
RULES FOR MAKING NEW CHARACTER MODULES (races, classes, themes, backgrounds)
GUIDE TO DESIGNING MAGIC ITEMS

This is your cash cow and conversion machine right here Wizards.  Make it a piece of cake for people to convert from one game system to this one, and you will get people purchasing product.  Give us the tools to customize my game world by adding my own races, themes and backgrounds and  I promise the creative GM community will suck this down like a two dollar hooker.
The "cash cow" for WotC will not come from pandering to adult players who want three to six 500-page tomes in order to customize all the content they desire with futsy little rules for minor races only played by one out of a hundred players. The cash cow will come in the form of a single stand-alone product, under 100 pages in length, and preferably under 50, which can be completely understood by a typical 12 year old in under one hour.

Yes, the rules for how weather effects alter weapon speed for half-gnomes in oriental settings may sell...to a few dozen uber-grognards. The simple-as-dirt OD&D styled red-box, dice included, promoted by a new cartoon series on the HUB network will sell millions of copies. THAT is the one WotC must produce.
IF there was to be a large book to contain all the core rules, there should definitely be smaller paperbacks sould with it that contain all the player info without all the monster and dm stuff. My group prefers to have 3 PH's at any given time, one for me the DM, and 2 to pass between the players. We do not want to buy 3 tomes of however many pages just to have basically 1.6 of those books used, at best. (1 tome for the dm plus .3 for one ph plus .3 for the other) its just silly.
You are Red/Blue!
You are Red/Blue!
The "cash cow" for WotC will not come from pandering to adult players who want three to six 500-page tomes in order to customize all the content they desire with futsy little rules for minor races only played by one out of a hundred players. The cash cow will come in the form of a single stand-alone product, under 100 pages in length, and preferably under 50, which can be completely understood by a typical 12 year old in under one hour. Yes, the rules for how weather effects alter weapon speed for half-gnomes in oriental settings may sell...to a few dozen uber-grognards. The simple-as-dirt OD&D styled red-box, dice included, promoted by a new cartoon series on the HUB network will sell millions of copies. THAT is the one WotC must produce.



Wow. I just had a flashback to my childhood in the 80s. They need a cartoon to go with this! (Hell, just buy the rights to one of MANY anime that have  D&D themes and translate it to promote the product.)

Your other example sound like a 3.5 book I found for $1.00 in  the discount bin at Books a million. I think it was from when LOFR was the official oriental setting for D&D.  
IF there was to be a large book to contain all the core rules, there should definitely be smaller paperbacks sould with it that contain all the player info without all the monster and dm stuff. My group prefers to have 3 PH's at any given time, one for me the DM, and 2 to pass between the players. We do not want to buy 3 tomes of however many pages just to have basically 1.6 of those books used, at best. (1 tome for the dm plus .3 for one ph plus .3 for the other) its just silly.



The Essentials route would be fine with me. Except make the monster manual a paperback as well so you could pick all three up for $60 and players could get one for $20. 

Not that I bought Essentials. I was over 4e by that point. 
The price point has to provide a completely playable game, to level five, for under $20. This product must be of the "impulse-buy"/birthday-present level for the parents of every twelve-year-old in the developed world. If it is packaged in a way that demands $60 investment just to get started and seriously hooked, d&d dies.
The price point has to provide a completely playable game, to level five, for under $20. This product must be of the "impulse-buy"/birthday-present level for the parents of every twelve-year-old in the developed world. If it is packaged in a way that demands $60 investment just to get started and seriously hooked, d&d dies.



You make a compelling argument and I agree for the most part, but I think the product you speak of would have to be more like an even more watered down version of these rules maybe taking you to level 5. I think that would be a great marketing scheme. I also want a core book geared at me. 

Make it economical for people in a time where economical games are needed.



Amen to that! Lots of Other game companies get this. Lets hope WOTC has learned some lessons.  I've been tempted by the Pathfinder core book($50) but haven't bought it due to the lack of monsters. If they put out a core set inlcuding the monsters they would already have a leg up on Pathfinder. The other major games right now are the WH40k ones being put out by FFG. Each of the core books($50) for the various games has all you need to start playing. The M&M heroes handbook($35) has all you need to play. Same goes for that new Marvel Heroic game($20) that is getting so much buzz. Savage Worlds core rules $10!

I could go on.  



That's why I like Paizo. They have the PRD online for free. I know Wizards won't do this for Modules but I think the Core Rules could be here and the bank not be broken.
I disagree. I much prefer the traditional 3 core books. PHB, DMG, Monster Manual; each reasonable priced at approximately $30. (unless you wanna give me some sweet special edition leather bound books to buy)


Players have no need for rules for monsters or how to run a game only the basic handbook. Dms on the other hand should probably have all 3.

As a player i dont want to have to dig through all the irrelivant stuff to get to what i need, and vice versa as a Dm.



Always excuse the spelling, and personal opinions are just that personal and opinions. Getting Down with the playtesting of 5th http://community.wizards.com/dndnext/go/thread/view/75882/29139253/Complilation_of_Playtest_Feedback Compilation of Feedback post /bump please
I don't want a whole bunch of books I just want to have access to everything with d&d insider that I can print out

and then maybe a 150-250-ish page reference book for rules at the table

honestly getting the first printing of a new edition monster manual seems like throwing money down the toilet since you know they're gonna rebalance things a year down the line anyway, I'd rather just print things as needed and I know I always am using the latest version.
I say we need a $20-35 boxed set, with a Player's Guide, DM's Guide, and Beastiary, some blank sheets, dice, and a Flash drive with PDFs of all the material.
I disagree. I much prefer the traditional 3 core books. PHB, DMG, Monster Manual; each reasonable priced at approximately $30. (unless you wanna give me some sweet special edition leather bound books to buy)


Players have no need for rules for monsters or how to run a game only the basic handbook. Dms on the other hand should probably have all 3.

As a player i dont want to have to dig through all the irrelivant stuff to get to what i need, and vice versa as a Dm.






This!

I say we need a $20-35 boxed set, with a Player's Guide, DM's Guide, and Beastiary, some blank sheets, dice, and a Flash drive with PDFs of all the material.


The newest edition of the Warhammer RPG is a 100$ box set.  It's crammed with all kinds of cool fiddly-bits and cards and counters and map tiles and cardboard stand-up minis.  They sell modules and expansions the same way.  You need to tackle box to keep track of it all.  The game is pretty popular.  If WotC tried the same route with D&D, people will buy it, myself included... but only if Kurt Wiegel gave the thumbs up.
I say we need a $20-35 boxed set, with a Player's Guide, DM's Guide, and Beastiary, some blank sheets, dice, and a Flash drive with PDFs of all the material.


The newest edition of the Warhammer RPG is a 100$ box set.  It's crammed with all kinds of cool fiddly-bits and cards and counters and map tiles and cardboard stand-up minis.  They sell modules and expansions the same way.  You need to tackle box to keep track of it all.  The game is pretty popular.  If WotC tried the same route with D&D, people will buy it, myself included... but only if Kurt Wiegel gave the thumbs up.



Maybe something that expensive could be an option with the base game and some of the "modules". Personally I don't see an already divided fansbase shelling out that much. I know I wouldn't. If WOTC wants my money for this I want everything I need to start for $50 or less. (i can do without dice) I suspect a lot of potential players feel this way.

I'm in favor of one reasonably priced book. Basic crammed 5 box sets into the Rules Cyclopedia (BECMI (well, mostly BECM)). If you aren't overloading it with an option for every possible mood and a class for every possible career path, and a bunch of races because somebody had a weird dream after overeating at Chili's and thought sticks and rocks would make great characters, you should be able to fit it into something that costs no more than 60 bucks TOPS.

"One book to rule them all!"
I'm in favor of one reasonably priced book. Basic crammed 5 box sets into the Rules Cyclopedia (BECMI (well, mostly BECM)). If you aren't overloading it with an option for every possible mood and a class for every possible career path, and a bunch of races because somebody had a weird dream after overeating at Chili's and thought sticks and rocks would make great characters, you should be able to fit it into something that costs no more than 60 bucks TOPS.

"One book to rule them all!"



 I forgot about the Rules Cyclopedia. My preference doesn't even have to be that in depth. 
     I would really love to see WoTC become more digitally friendly with this version, but more on that in a second.
   
     I am a fan of the one core book concept. It's true that "players" don't need all the content, but wouldn't it be great if more players found the desire to DM once in a while. One book or many, I would deffinately prefer the smaller, essential sized format.  I might imagine that this would help keep the cost of the books a little lower, but my main reason goes back to my original point. 

     I want to be able to read my books in a e-reader or iPad. PDF, or epub versions of full sized books take constant fiddling with zooming in this column or that table. An essential sized book would convert to a much easier to read digital version. And, of course, with digital books, no matter how many I bring with me to the table, it is still the size of one paper.  I obviously want my paper books too, I just want the option.  

Game tree friendly. ;) 
I don't like the idea of using only one book. They should have a boxed set for a reasonable price, then have the three books, each at 20-30 dollars. A player shouldn't be paying for all the DM's stuff.
"So shall it be! Dear-bought those songs shall be be accounted, and yet shall be well-bought. For the price could be no other. Thus even as Eru spoke to us shall beauty not before conceived be brought into Eä, and evil yet be good to have been." - Manwë, High King of the Valar
One Book to Bind Them All.
Enough to satisfy old-hands but the primary purpose should be new-bloods.
It'll need to at least give enough of a hint at how things are designed to enable extrapolation to create monsters and player races that are not included - the reader can see how to create races/ monsters from computer games. Then they can decide to do their own thing or buy the official version in that intriging but not insanely expensive pdf...

Do not make it appear that to play this game you will need to buy extra books.
Make the extra books something desirable but not essential. 
If you enjoy it enough, there are the expansion softcovers and pdf format supplements.
Expansions for each class, for gameworlds, for monsters...
But One Book to Bind Them All or simply good enough to satisfy.



I would like the following:
3 core books. In a managable size, under the argument that big books gives of the "I'm complicated" wibe.
There should be a bundle option that gave a discount to the books of some sort.
Maybe with dice and cardboard minies or something as well.

and then they could add module splatt books that are trade paperbacks and geared towards 1 class or monsters brand or what ever, that werent that big. Sort of like they did for the various cities.

But no mather what, bring back some sort of digital format... I' would love if i could bring nothing but a pad/ebook reader for my sessions...
I disagree. I much prefer the traditional 3 core books. PHB, DMG, Monster Manual; each reasonable priced at approximately $30. (unless you wanna give me some sweet special edition leather bound books to buy)


Players have no need for rules for monsters or how to run a game only the basic handbook. Dms on the other hand should probably have all 3.

As a player i dont want to have to dig through all the irrelivant stuff to get to what i need, and vice versa as a Dm.






+1

Take a loot at Dark Dungeons, Swords & Wizardry, OSRIC, etc.

If there is a push to make the new edition reminiscent of older editions I say they MUSH do this as most people who today have knowledge of those editions have it from retro-clones.

When you add the fact that Pathfinder has the DMG and PHB in one book and people love it for that you can't really go back.

You want three books? Why? Just so you can show off how many books you own?

If the rules are supposed to be modular I say you just need a core that can be provided in a single book.

At a low enough price point buying people will be happier buying a single book that splitting the costs between players and DM or buying a book each month.

Money is tight. You ight have a gaming budget but most people don't. You want a hobby where you spend lots of cash get into MTG or W40K. D&D has a chance to be relatively inexpensive at it's core, why mess with that?
I have to say, I think WotC got it right with Essentials, or at least pretty close. Give me one book with the rules for character creation and advancement with all the races, classes, themes, and backgrounds with the sort of items a character can actually buy or get hold of without adventuring (Heroes of... series). Give me a second book that has all the monsters, traps, and magic items I need as DM to populate the dungeons (sort of a combo Monster Vault and Mordenkainen's Magnificent Emporium). Give me a third book that has the sort of guidance that new DMs will need (DM's Kit). And give me a fifth book that has all the rules for actually running the game (Rules Compendium). Price each one at around $20 retail.

Why do I like this format? Because I hate having to flip through a 500+ page book that weighs damn near 5 lbs to look up one spell, skill, or item like I do with Pathfinder. I, as DM, need a completely different set of information than my players need. With a $50 price tag, there's almost no chance my players are going to buy the book for themselves (I've been running my game since January and we're still passing my book around every session). The person playing the sorcerer is looking up a spell description for his turn when I have to take the book away from him and possibly lose his spot so I can look up the DC for a skill the rogue is trying to use. Drives me insane.

Breaking the books down into Player/DM/Dungeon/Rules will also increase the likelihood of multiple copies of the books being at my gaming table and will prevent the need to shuffle books around. I keep my monster book and rules book behind the DM screen and let the players pass around the player's books so when I need to reference something, it's at my fingertips. Smaller books also mean it's easier to find the specific information you're looking for since there's less to scan through.

I'm also a Shadowrun player as well as D&D and Pathfinder. If you're not familiar with the game, it has a "core rulebook" which has all the basic rules for both playing and running the game in a single 300-400 page book. It also has several other "core" books which expand on rules for the various character types you can play with "optional" and "expanded" rules. In practice, these additional rules are pretty much necessary for the characters to be efficient so you have to have them all around, which defeats the entire purpose of having a single core rulebook. It's a lot like AD&D 2nd Edition if you remember that, only moreso. Imagine for a moment you combined the PHB, DMG, and MM all into one book that was about 350 pages long, but only had the most basic of basic rules for the different classes. If you wanted to use feats or any combat maneuvers for your Fighter, you had to have the Fighter Handbook. If you wanted to use rituals or have a decent selection of spells, you had to have the Wizard Handbook. If you wanted to be able to use backstab/sneak attack or make use of all your skills, you had to have the Rogue Handbook. So instead of bringing three books with me when I want to run a game, I have to bring 6-8 books to make sure I have all the rules I need. Very annoying.

Yes, I know the PRD is online and I can reference that on a laptop, tablet, or smartphone. But I hate that option for several reasons. First, it encourages players too pull out said devices which can distract them from the game (I already have enough problems with the Fighter/Rogue playing Words with Friends during combat). Second, I can flip through a book I'm even roughly familiar with and find what I'm looking for far faster than I can search online. Maybe it's because I'm more used to running out of books than off websites or PDFs, maybe it's just how my memory is wired. But I can remember what a page looks like or where on a page information is far faster than I can figure out the proper search terms to enter and then scroll through a list of results to find the specific information I'm looking for. Finally, it just feels wrong. D&D is a game about medieval-inspired fantasy. Fiddling around with my Android phone really breaks me out of the mindset of the game world, while thumbing through a book actually adds to it (especially if the art design is good).
You say "essentials got it right," then describe a book that never existed in essentials. I could see two books, 40-50 pages eachmaybe, one with basic character creation, equipment and spell lists, the other covering basic combat/skills challenges, maybe two dozen iconic monsters, and treasure.

All gotta be under $30.
3 books I can live with. I may not buy them all but I can live with.

5 different books at my table? Not going to happen.

  • Make them digest-sized for the love of all that is holy and unholy i cannot stress this enough, they are portable that way and there is no call to make them all giant hardcovers

  • Make a starter book that has DMG/PHB/MM à la the original Redbox, and sell a box of dice and some maps next to it, that way we can get our noob friends willing to invest without having to buy 11 books to play. You had the right idea at Essentials, albeit missed the train a little.

  • do. not. make. sexist. art. inside. Boobies are not visible in armor, mages would reasonably be covered by their clothing, women tend not to stand with their **** facing the combat just so they viewer can be tittilated. Have you ever seen plate mail? You can't tell if someone in it is a man or a woman, and unless it's an illustration of the fantasy-Gaul women AND men naked but for woad, let's keep the pictures that make my friends refuse to play out of the game. And they're not prudes - our games have sex in it, and adult themes, and some of the players are voluntary sex workers! - but that's not the same as trashy illos of boobies.

The boxed set I imagine is a delux boxed set similar to but more robust than the 1st ed, 3.5, or Pathfinder boxed sets: A player's guide with all the necessary bits in it (that could also be sold as a seperate product for those who just want to play) a DM Guide with all of the rules to run the game and plenty of sound advice, a chocked-full Bestiary, some really nice dice, some table handouts to help familiarize players and GM's with the rules, as well as remind people quickly of their spells, conditions, Advantage/Disatvantage options, some blank character sheets with plenty of room to write and that are well laid out, and some form of media that had pdfs so you could print out replacements as needed.

I think such a thing could be produced fairly cheeply, and I would even sttle for the dice to be out to keep the cost down, as long as that fact was on the box for those new to the hobby. I don't see any reason for it to be anywhere near the cost of the WFRP3 boxed set, nor do I think it needs to be anywhere near the $90+ it took to get invested in 4th, but could see it hiting near the $60 mark (+/- $10) it took to buy into (early) 3rd edition, as long as it was a delux boxed set (harcover books, sturdy hardcover-type box, dice at that price-point, full-color hand outs and character sheets, etc.
You say "essentials got it right," then describe a book that never existed in essentials.


I also added a qualifier of "pretty much". I'd rather have four books at $20 than three books at $30.

Players: Main races (Human, Elf, Half-elf, Dwarf, Halfling, maybe Gnome and Half-orc), main classes (Fighter, Wizard, Rogue, Cleric, maybe others depending on how many are just themes now), about 2-3 themes for every class, about a dozen backgrounds, rules for character creation, mundane equipment and stuff the players can reasonably make/buy (potions, scrolls, etc.)

DM: Advice on how to create an adventure and run a campaign, random tables for generating encounters, dungeons, towns, etc.

Dungeon: Monsters, magic items, and traps.

Rules: All the hard crunchy rules. Rules Compendium was the greatest product out of all of 4e. Give me that one book and I can run a game from it alone (plus character sheets, dice, tokens/minis, map/tiles, scratch paper, and pencils).

The main reason I say four books is that I hate paying for stuff I don't use. It bothered the hell out of me buying Monster Vault for $10 more than other books in Essentials because it came with stuff I had absolutely no need for (poster maps, tokens, and an adventure). I would've been far happier if it'd just been $19.99 for the book alone. That's why I want the DM advice book separated from magic items because odds are I'll never once use the thing. I've been running games for 20 years in over a dozen different systems including at least a few sessions in every edition of D&D and at least one long-running campaign in every edition since 2nd. I think I know what I'm doing in how to run a campaign and I don't want to buy a 200 page book for the 20-30 pages or so of magic items and traps.
The price point has to provide a completely playable game, to level five, for under $20. This product must be of the "impulse-buy"/birthday-present level for the parents of every twelve-year-old in the developed world. If it is packaged in a way that demands $60 investment just to get started and seriously hooked, d&d dies.



I agree that this is needed for D&D to have a chance of bringing new players into the hobby.  I fondly remember buying my first D&D Basic set and watching it spread through my small town because we could buy it at the local Target for about $12.  It was easy for the kids to sell it to their parents.

In this day and age, Wizards should seriously consider offering a download of the core game for free while also putting a physical copy in mass market stores like Walmart, Target, and Toys R Us.  

Create the familiar 3 core books for current players moving to Next.  Forget the hardcovers.  I don't want to pay the extra cost for them in this economic climate.  

Keep the page count to the absolute minimum for the main core rules.  I want simple, clean rules that are easy to digest and a book that makes it easy to find what I need during actual play.

Give me great DM advice in the DMG and all the rules for creating new stuff for the game (rule modules, monsters, adventures, themes, backgrounds, adventures, campaigns).  Give me a ton of monsters in the Monster Manual and give me rules for how to swap stuff out to make them unique and memorable.

Finally, Wizards should also seriously consider offering new modules through a micro-transaction economy (think iTunes).  

I would buy an abstract wealth system module (like Resources in Burning Wheel), an organization system module (kinda like companies in Reign), stronghold and nation building system modules so the players can make vast changes in the campaign world, and a random adventure generation system module to help spark my creativity when I'm pressed for time.

I would buy each of those system modules separately, but I'm highly unlikely to buy separate expensive physical books just to get those system modules with a lot of extra crap I just don't need or want. 

Roy


  • do. not. make. sexist. art. inside. Boobies are not visible in armor, mages would reasonably be covered by their clothing, women tend not to stand with their **** facing the combat just so they viewer can be tittilated. Have you ever seen plate mail? You can't tell if someone in it is a man or a woman, and unless it's an illustration of the fantasy-Gaul women AND men naked but for woad, let's keep the pictures that make my friends refuse to play out of the game. And they're not prudes - our games have sex in it, and adult themes, and some of the players are voluntary sex workers! - but that's not the same as trashy illos of boobies.




This, for the love of God, THIS! I have some books that I can't take to work because of the soft porn inside. Get your ya-yas elsewhere! My brother-in-law only lets his kids play at my table when they come over as long as I don't let them see the books. Do a "Hot Chicks In Padded Leather" or "Hunks of the Sword Coast" meat magazine/carnal calendar if you must, but leave the flesh-o-rama out. (No prude here, either. I have an adult-fantasy fictional memoir out there and have painted pin-ups for individuals and clubs that run the gamut from "oo-la-la!" to "oh my god!")
I see a lot of people going for a essentials and a regular version. Don't make us buy both. Essentials had differences from 4E, almost bought it but didn't want to play a .5 edition of a game on it's way to the grave.

Make it a solid experience. Stuff may be missing from any essential line but nothing should be in it that isn't in the regular books if you do this.

And all classes in 3E MUST be in any basic book of D&D today, especially if it claims compatibility with older stuff.

I wouldn't mind if the barbarian was a theme on the fighter as well as the wizard being a theme for the sorceror (or the other way around), the rogue being a theme for the thief, etc.


  • do. not. make. sexist. art. inside. Boobies are not visible in armor, mages would reasonably be covered by their clothing, women tend not to stand with their **** facing the combat just so they viewer can be tittilated. Have you ever seen plate mail? You can't tell if someone in it is a man or a woman, and unless it's an illustration of the fantasy-Gaul women AND men naked but for woad, let's keep the pictures that make my friends refuse to play out of the game. And they're not prudes - our games have sex in it, and adult themes, and some of the players are voluntary sex workers! - but that's not the same as trashy illos of boobies.




This, for the love of God, THIS! I have some books that I can't take to work because of the soft porn inside. Get your ya-yas elsewhere! My brother-in-law only lets his kids play at my table when they come over as long as I don't let them see the books. Do a "Hot Chicks In Padded Leather" or "Hunks of the Sword Coast" meat magazine/carnal calendar if you must, but leave the flesh-o-rama out. (No prude here, either. I have an adult-fantasy fictional memoir out there and have painted pin-ups for individuals and clubs that run the gamut from "oo-la-la!" to "oh my god!")


Okay...I'm going to preface this...I agree with what you're saying. I completely agree with the sentiment. I completely agree with showing people regardless of gender in practical armor. I believe strongly that the art should reflect multiple classes, races, and genders to the point that I supported Sarah Darkmagic's Kickstarter to commission CC-licensed fantasy art showing female versions of different race/class combinations in non-objectifying ways. I really agree with what you're saying.

However, I also like good looking art. You can show a woman in practical armor in a realistic pose that still looks cool. You can have a female sorcerer/wizard/rogue who is fully dressed and also in a realistic pose who is, dare I say it, sexy. I want a good aesthetic in the game. I want it to look cool. I want the men to look strong and powerful and I want the women to look strong, powerful, and sexy (I'm a heterosexual male, sue me).

This can be done without cheesecake pictures. If I wanted that, I'm sure there's a coffee table book or three of Vallejo art I can order, if not back issues of Heavy Metal magazine. That's not what I want. I want characters to look awesome without being purely objectified. I also don't mind women looking sexy as long as it makes sense. A rogue wearing leather pants makes sense. A sorcerer with high charisma dressing in revealing clothes makes sense. A male wizard wearing flowing Gandalf robes and a female wizard wearing flowing see-through gossamer garments does not make sense. Chainmail bikinis have never made sense.

Hopefully, I've made my point clear enough without digging the hole too deeply for myself...
The price point has to provide a completely playable game, to level five, for under $20. This product must be of the "impulse-buy"/birthday-present level for the parents of every twelve-year-old in the developed world. If it is packaged in a way that demands $60 investment just to get started and seriously hooked, d&d dies.



I agree that this is needed for D&D to have a chance of bringing new players into the hobby.  I fondly remember buying my first D&D Basic set and watching it spread through my small town because we could buy it at the local Target for about $12.  It was easy for the kids to sell it to their parents.

In this day and age, Wizards should seriously consider offering a download of the core game for free while also putting a physical copy in mass market stores like Walmart, Target, and Toys R Us.  

Create the familiar 3 core books for current players moving to Next.  Forget the hardcovers.  I don't want to pay the extra cost for them in this economic climate.  

Keep the page count to the absolute minimum for the main core rules.  I want simple, clean rules that are easy to digest and a book that makes it easy to find what I need during actual play.



Yes! Keep the page count to a minimum and make this accessible to kids with a reasonable price. DM advice should be limited to very basic concepts on how to run a game, monster creation, and other usefull rules. Make the fluff that goes into most DM guides an add on book. I still remember getting the 4e DMG. Even a newbie DM would only really need about 20 pages of that book, an experienced one about 3, and most of its really important items were repeated on the DM screen. 

I'm noticing from the posts here that there seem to be collector gamers and just gamers. I have several collector friends in my group. They do enjoy their deluxe leatherbound signed by the authors with design note special editions of some games. That's cool. But I'm just a gamer and am happy to use a pdf, paperback, hardback, box set, or whatever. Price does matter to me because money is tight right now. I want to get started with 5e for the right price or I probably won't bother. I think after 4e a lot of potential customers feel like me.