DC X to learn content of a book = awesome!

I loved the DC to learn the content of a book / tome. This supports the typical player cliche whose character concept is to "go out and seek knowledge".

Only thing I would love to see changed: Remove the fixed 1 hour duration and let the DM decide how long it takes to read a book.


Only thing I would love to see changed: Remove the fixed 1 hour duration and let the DM decide how long it takes to read a book.



I think an hour to read a book is perfectly reasonable. I don't see how you could learn much from a book that didn't take at least an hour to read. It's not like this is an Eric Carle book your character's going to be reading, it's most likely referring to an encyclopedic book containing meaningful knowledge. 

I dunno, I think it's more than justified. I remember having characters spend time in libraries and ultimately receiving a +2 to +5 circumstance bonus to my knowledge check in the end(3.X). It's nice to see that idea actually have real mechanics now that DMs don't have to either give you a hint, give you nothing because 'there are no books on the subject', or receiving a simple circumstance bonus. 
You read Int mod pages in a minute, would be my answer. Most books have a number of pages divisible by 32. I'd go from there.
Been to college?  Good luck reading any textbook in an hour.  You could browse for content, and likely find it, but every word?  I'm calling shenanigans.
Been to college?  Good luck reading any textbook in an hour.  You could browse for content, and likely find it, but every word?  I'm calling shenanigans.

The idea is that you scan for the information that you are looking for.


Tome: This heavy book contains lore pertaining to a particular topic. The DM assigns a DC to the tome’s lore. If you spend an hour studying the tome, you automatically succeed at one lore check with a DC less than or equal to the tome’s DC rating. 

So if you have a magic item and it is a 15 DC to identify it but you don't have the skill to identify it then you open up the DC 15 Magic Item Tomb and read that for an hour, make a DC 15 INT test. On success you identify the Magic Item since it is equal to or lower than the DC of the Tomb, on failure you don't find the information in the Tomb, try again later.

Im sorry but ADEU is a French word for goodbye, not a combat system. You say, "Encounter Power" and I stop listening to you. [spoiler Have Played/Run] D&D 1st ed D&D 3.5 ed D&D 4th ed Shadowrun Star Wars SAGA Cyberpunk Interlock Unlimited Run.Net [/spoiler] I know my games, don't try to argue about them. [spoiler Alignment Explained] This is a very simple problem and I will outline it below. Their are two types of people Type 1: a lot of people (not all, but a lot) who play see alignment as "I am lawful good thus I must play lawful good" Type 2: a lot of people (not all, but a lot) who play see alignment as "My previous actions have made people and the gods view me as lawful good. The difference is subtle but it is the source of the misunderstanding. Alignment does not dictate how you play your character. All it does is tell you, the player, how the rest of the world views you, and your previous actions. Any future actions will be judged by their own merits. Say you're a baby eating pyromaniac. You are most likely chaotic evil. But one day you decide, "Hey all I really need is love." So you get a wife, have a kid, and get a kitten named Mr. Snook'ems. You become a member of the PTA and help build houses for the homeless. You are no longer chaotic evil. And just because you were once chaotic evil it does not mean that you have to stay chaotic evil. Alignment never dictates what you can do, it only says what you have done. Now that is cleared up here is a simple test. What is the alignment of... A Police officer: The average Citizen: A Vigilante: The answer is simple. The Police officer is lawful good. He uses the laws of the country and city to arrest people and make them pay their debt to society. The Citizen is Neutral good. He wants to live is a place that is Good and follows moral and ethical principle, but he sometimes finds the laws impedes him, and he wonders why we spend so much on poor people. The Vigilante is Chaotic Good. He wants to uphold the morals and ethics of society but finds that the bad guys often slip through the cracks in the law. He takes it upon himself to protect the people from these criminals. That is the basic breakdown of the good alignment axis. What needs to be remembered is that any one of these people can change alignments, easily. The Police officer could be bought off by a local gang, and suddenly he drops to lawful neutral. The average citizen might find that his neighbors dog is annoying, barking at night and keeping him up. So he poisons its food, now he is no longer good, he is stepping towards true neutral. Maybe the citizen really goes crazy also kills the neighbor, hello neutral evil. It is possible that the Vigilante realizes that the cops are actually doing a pretty good job and decides to become an officer himself, leaving his masked crime fighting days behind him. Now he is Lawful good. Your alignment is not carved in stone, it is malleable and will change to reflect your actions.[/spoiler]
The way I understood it was that you read the book once and then from this point on you will automatically succeed on lore checks up to the DC's rating.
Wich is not very realistic or it would be way easier to go to college
The way I understood it was that you read the book once and then from this point on you will automatically succeed on lore checks up to the DC's rating.

Tome: This heavy book contains lore pertaining to a particular topic. The DM assigns a DC to the tome’s lore. If you spend an hour studying the tome, you automatically succeed at one lore check with a DC less than or equal to the tome’s DC rating. 

Does that answer the question? Sure you can read it now and auto make one check anytime in the future, but only one check.

And the way it is written impliies that you need to have the object/task in question know/at hand while reading the book. But this last part is purely implied.
Im sorry but ADEU is a French word for goodbye, not a combat system. You say, "Encounter Power" and I stop listening to you. [spoiler Have Played/Run] D&D 1st ed D&D 3.5 ed D&D 4th ed Shadowrun Star Wars SAGA Cyberpunk Interlock Unlimited Run.Net [/spoiler] I know my games, don't try to argue about them. [spoiler Alignment Explained] This is a very simple problem and I will outline it below. Their are two types of people Type 1: a lot of people (not all, but a lot) who play see alignment as "I am lawful good thus I must play lawful good" Type 2: a lot of people (not all, but a lot) who play see alignment as "My previous actions have made people and the gods view me as lawful good. The difference is subtle but it is the source of the misunderstanding. Alignment does not dictate how you play your character. All it does is tell you, the player, how the rest of the world views you, and your previous actions. Any future actions will be judged by their own merits. Say you're a baby eating pyromaniac. You are most likely chaotic evil. But one day you decide, "Hey all I really need is love." So you get a wife, have a kid, and get a kitten named Mr. Snook'ems. You become a member of the PTA and help build houses for the homeless. You are no longer chaotic evil. And just because you were once chaotic evil it does not mean that you have to stay chaotic evil. Alignment never dictates what you can do, it only says what you have done. Now that is cleared up here is a simple test. What is the alignment of... A Police officer: The average Citizen: A Vigilante: The answer is simple. The Police officer is lawful good. He uses the laws of the country and city to arrest people and make them pay their debt to society. The Citizen is Neutral good. He wants to live is a place that is Good and follows moral and ethical principle, but he sometimes finds the laws impedes him, and he wonders why we spend so much on poor people. The Vigilante is Chaotic Good. He wants to uphold the morals and ethics of society but finds that the bad guys often slip through the cracks in the law. He takes it upon himself to protect the people from these criminals. That is the basic breakdown of the good alignment axis. What needs to be remembered is that any one of these people can change alignments, easily. The Police officer could be bought off by a local gang, and suddenly he drops to lawful neutral. The average citizen might find that his neighbors dog is annoying, barking at night and keeping him up. So he poisons its food, now he is no longer good, he is stepping towards true neutral. Maybe the citizen really goes crazy also kills the neighbor, hello neutral evil. It is possible that the Vigilante realizes that the cops are actually doing a pretty good job and decides to become an officer himself, leaving his masked crime fighting days behind him. Now he is Lawful good. Your alignment is not carved in stone, it is malleable and will change to reflect your actions.[/spoiler]
I can see it going either way. While it may seem a bit 'convenient' to run into something a year or so later and auto succeed to remember that you did in fact read about this in a book, the fact that it's going to be limited to something relevant to the topic of the book, would make it still make sense. Sure, it may be convenient that you remembered reading about centaurs, but that's a reward for reading a book on human animal hybrids the last time you were in town.
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