Alignment changes as plot device - will it work?

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I have an idea about changing the PCs' alignment for a short while. I could do it in a number of ways, either through a deity or other powerful being, or artifact.


I am considering two options:

1) diametrically opposed: lawful good becomes chaotic evil and so forth, as classses allow

2) all characters become good (or evil)

I want to do this in order to shake up my players' usual character profiles and get some amusing roleplaying out of it. What are your thoughts? Could this be fun for an hour or several sessions, depending on the players' abiility to adapt?

 Could this be fun for an hour or several sessions, depending on the players' abiility to adapt?




  Personally sure why not. As for your players I have no idea. You may run it past your players first and see how they feel. A lot of players hate allignments let alone having theirs messed with. You should also think long term. Your 'good' party becomes 'evil' and does the whole burn, ****, and pillage thing and go overboard. Not fun in my book and then if they become good again I dont think the effected people of the 'evil group' will let the groups wrong doing slide so then you have another issue to deal with. If you go for it please follow up post. Would like to see how it goes.

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I want to do this in order to shake up my players' usual character profiles and get some amusing roleplaying out of it. What are your thoughts?

This depends completely upon your players. Not only does it depend on *if* they will like it. It also depends on *if* they will implement it. And it depends on *how* they will implement it.

In my experience, quite a few players simply will not play an evil character. And of those who will, a large portion play all evil as chaotic stupid. If you have any of these players in your group, you will not accomplish your goals. The former won't have fun being forced to play an evil character. The latter will likely make the game no fun for those in the group who do not appreciate chaotic stupid.

However, *if* you have none of these kinds of players in your group, it could be fun.

I would recommend getting buy in out of game, one player at a time. Leave out the part of this affecting everyone. Let each player think theirs is the only PC to have been so affected. THEN watch the RP unfold.
Here are the PHB essentia, in my opinion:
  • Three Basic Rules (p 11)
  • Power Types and Usage (p 54)
  • Skills (p178-179)
  • Feats (p 192)
  • Rest and Recovery (p 263)
  • All of Chapter 9 [Combat] (p 264-295)
A player needs to read the sections for building his or her character -- race, class, powers, feats, equipment, etc. But those are PC-specific. The above list is for everyone, regardless of the race or class or build or concept they are playing.
Could make for an interesting curse, or mini event. If the players aren't into it it won't work though. You can't really force them to play a specific alignment.

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"Can't say enough how much I agree with Krusk"        "Wow, thank you very much"

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I would recommend getting buy in out of game, one player at a time. Leave out the part of this affecting everyone. Let each player think theirs is the only PC to have been so affected. THEN watch the RP unfold.



omg this! Better yet, have it play out so that none of the players are even aware that the other PCs were similarly effected. They'll each think they're the only one affected by this, and that the rest of the party is still normal. This should compel them to try to hide the fact that their alignment has changed, meaning they'll still mostly act normal, at first, but slowly start revealing their new nature, until it culminates in a huge RP scene where everybody reveals they've also been affected, and now the party must work together to either struggle with their new moral outlooks they've had since their epiphany, or try to find a way to undo the damage.

"Not only are you wrong, but I even created an Excel spreadsheet to show you how wrong you are." --James Wyatt, May 2006

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At least you're playing 4e where this won't screw characters out of class abilities ...

But, still, I cannot recommend this at all.  I'm a big fan of letting the player play his own character; forcibly changing his alignment seems very close to the DM saying 'No, you'll run this character how I want you to'.  I would anticipate a lot of resentful, spiteful results.
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I'm with Salla. Best to leave their character to them and you present them with other challenges.

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I say talk to your players. Don't expect them to go for it, but present them with the idea. Definitely approach them individually, and if none them are down for it, don't do it.

But it won't hurt to ask. 

"Not only are you wrong, but I even created an Excel spreadsheet to show you how wrong you are." --James Wyatt, May 2006

Dilige, et quod vis fac