adventure modules

I'd like to see the published adventure modules stories improved, with more clues and answers thrown in along the way to keep the players interested.  Right now, the players just keep fighting until they get to the final battle, so much so that they often have to be reminded what their goal is.  There is no searching for information, keys, maps, etc. like there used to be.
   Another suggestion is to make each room set up for characters of different levels.  If the adventure is for characters of levels 4-6, tell me how many of each monster to have if the characters are 4th level, 5th, or 6th.  This would make it less necessary to run the adventures in a linear way.  If certain areas should not be accessed until a certain level, make the players have to find a key or map to get there. 
I don't think many people are going to disagree with that. :-)

In my own adventures, as a rule of thumb I have one non-combat encounter/puzzle/RP section for each combat encounter and it seems to feel about right.
"There is no searching for information, keys, maps, etc. like there used to be." 
Be prepared for someone to come along and tell you that's not fun. There are a lot of things that I've had tons of fun with in D&D that I've recently been told aren't, in fact, fun. Imagine my surprise.

Yup, more riddles, mysteries and non-combat encounters would be nice. I can very easily make combat encounters myself; it takes more time for me to do the story bits. Printed adventures should be to save GMs time, hence should focus on what GMs otherwise would spend the most time on.


I would also like to see scenarios that aren't all about dungeon-crawling. Some castle intrigue might be nice and would also highlight non-combat abilites.


One of the encounters from years ago that my circle of players remembers most was something as simple as having to cross a moat unnoticed. The fighter types of course wanted to bring their heavy armor along, so wouldn't swim, while the rogue and wizard types were happy with swimming and didn't want to waste time devicing floats of some kind. I think we spent hours arguing back and forth while time of course also passed in the game world, making it increasingly important to reach a decision. Such challenges can end up being more giving to the players than having to wade through hordes of monsters.

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