Deck building, the art of teaching?

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Ok so, so myself and a few other players are going to be helping out the new young players at our local spot with deck building, the basics, little bit of deck tech. now one on one i can talk to a kid all day aobut his deck, the problem is. we can't figure out how to make it more of a workshop so everyone gets to learn and we dont get stuck just talking about a few different deck types.  ANY help here would be nice, deck building exercises, tips, any of that would help. thank you!
Ok so, so myself and a few other players are going to be helping out the new young players at our local spot with deck building, the basics, little bit of deck tech. now one on one i can talk to a kid all day aobut his deck, the problem is. we can't figure out how to make it more of a workshop so everyone gets to learn and we dont get stuck just talking about a few different deck types.  ANY help here would be nice, deck building exercises, tips, any of that would help. thank you!



Teaching them about the number of something to put in their decks(4 if want in starting hand, 3 if you want early, 2 if you want sometime in game, 1 if tutored out), giving them tips on the windows a card can be played(sorcs, insts), mana ramping, and general usefulness of some cards should get them a good start.
I am Blue/Green
I am Blue/Green
Take The Magic Dual Colour Test - Beta today!
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This is pretty basic stuff and you probably had it in mind before but since some people that are used to it tend to take it for granted...

Explain them the importance of colored cmcs in multi-color decks. I swear I see kids all the time failling to get decent mana in games because they built the deck with the numbered cmcs in mind but not number of colored cmcs in individual cards and in said number cmcs (and spread out towards the deck).  I see this especially in limited where I get color screwed less often in 4 colors than many kids who do in 2 color. (the importance of manafixing while at it). I believe the land distribution in multicolor is also a great challenge to new people.

Hope I explained myself well enough and that you get better advices here, cant think of much else right now.
we figured we would go over all that first day. but here is a problem we're having. we arent sure if its gonna be us doing the same thing every week? or a set list of kids that come back everyweek and we go over something new each week. if thats the case i feel like we would have more time to really help. like you said tho, start with the basics and then move on from there. and thing else?
If i were you i would start by teaching them on how to draft. So that way they can have the feeling of making a deck from scratch. At the start tell them what a draft is (I hope you know what it it xD) then tell them the best way of drafting that works for you. For example i would say...

"First of all you divide the boosters up into colour groups then in each colour group rank it by the highest drop(s). After you have done that with all of them, see which 2 colours you would like to play with. (you can play with three or one or more) Wh you are choosing make sure you look for thecards that are cheap and dont cost alot of mana but also do quite a bit of damage. then finally Count up the cards you have chosen to play with. 40 is the the best as you can get out your best creatures quickly."


I hope this helped.
Chris.


Good luck with the workshop.      

 
yeah we were thinking about doing it that way. problem is we're trying to keep it cheap for the kids and the people we are doing it for have leagues going on right now so we have a limmited chunk of time. which is why i was hoping it would be the same set of kids for x amound of weeks. i do like that idea tho, if we cant figure something else out that may be the way we go. we're gonna have to go over that with them at some point anyway, but  like you said, it helps with building form nothing lol
Cool,

Good luck anyway.
 
People always hate this method of teaching. Some people talk about not having access to 4 of each card (even if they cost as little as ten American cents), and others go as far as to thinking that 4 of each card automatically equates to "Tournament Spike Ruthless Deck". It doesn't.

When I first came across this method, I did not know what I was doing, as this was before I had joined these forums and came across a link to this method. But I got tired of beating everyone I played and then having my friend visit for a weekend and getting curbstomped day in and day out. So I decided to make a deck that was exactly 60 cards (I knew this was the minimum, but I normally made decks that were 65 to 68 cards, and so did everyone else). 

I made a Bringer deck. Four of everything that I wanted, plus lands. As I later found out, this method is a very good method to teach beginners how to construct their first couple of decks. As they get better, they will then (and only then!) learn the value of having 1-ofs, 2-ofs, and 3-ofs in a deck. That Bringer deck was unbeatable in my circle that I played against back then. It's not because it was particularly good (it was horrible by the standards I have now, I should have been running a couple of countermagic spells at least), but it did what it was supposed to do every time I played it. That's something that couldn't be said for many of my peers of that time.

The method is as follow:
1) Find nine cards. Cards that you want to use; it doesn't matter whether they are good or bad, but all the cards should serve some purpose of what the deck is supposed to do.

2) Get four of each of those cards. That's 36 cards.

3) Add twenty-four lands using the method of your choice on how to determine how many of each land is needed (I have never picked a method, as I just eyeball them, personally. Vektor480 knows a good method of deciding how many of each land one needs in multicolor decks).

And there you have it. That's your deck. It may not win you every game, but at least it will do what you want it to do consistently. Learning how and why some control and combo decks run vastly different numbers of certain cards is not something that a beginner should be worrying about, but rather they need to understand how a Basic Deck is supposed to work. Anything beyond that is for later. 

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How;s a 2 drop 1/2, Flying broken? What am I missing?
You're missing it because *turns Storm Crows sideways* all your base are belong to Chuck Norris and every other overused meme ever.
I did help my friends and players who had questions back in the days, but I never was a teacher of the game in that manner.

Still, to keep your workshop running, how about going back on older sets and abilities like banding or phasing and explaing the pros/cons of the cards & sets globaly. ? I don't know how easily accessible cards like Benalish Hero or Teferi's Curse are today (I sold all my cards a bit after Mercadian Masks came out and I never entered a card shop after), but it may keep your students interested.

@JustTerrorlt, not a bad idea, that 9 cards set-up but isn't 24 lands just drowning your deck ? Even at 40/20 wich is the basis on wich I learned, you can get too much lands back-to-back.

For the lands, I usually put 4 lands-search, Terramorphic Expanse, Bad River, Arid Mesa or anything similar for the appropriate colors in my decks, so that leave me 16 spots to fill. For mono-color it's a no brainer but for multi-colored decks  I count the numbers of time a symbol , , , , appears then I make a ratio on the total of all the symbols and apply that ratio to the 16 lands I have to get.


For example, in a 2 colored deck I have appears 15 times and appears 5 times. Counting I have artifacts that don't really care for the color but less blue cards I splitted the lands 11 mountains, 5 islands. 5 may seem high, but my blue cards have more double or triple   while my red cards mostly have only 1

I have a black & white deck, where the numbers of symbols are 13 & 11 so I splitted my mana 8 of each. And so on, according to the numbers.

I don't have scientific studies to back my method but so far it works pretty good, and if you have dual lands it helps too.
My decks, mostly casuals, but some I use online with some small changes: http://www.mtgvault.com/Profile.aspx?UserID=91484
24 is my minimum for decks that want to reach 6 cmc
20 is fine for rdw that goes up to 3

for control decks that can't lose an early landdrop I go with 27-29


this is for online with actually random shuffling
for the insufficient shuffling that humans do 20 might be enough
proud member of the 2011 community team
to keep on track here, we're looking for ideas on HOW to teach them, lol not WHAT to teach them. these are all gonna be younger kids that really need to learn the roots first. i really like the older sets idea tho, the only thing i worrie about is with some of the older sets they havnt shortend the text, like "creature can attact when it enters the battle field" instead of "haste" lol i'm not trying to confuse em. this has all been so much help tho. keep the ideas coming please!
to keep on track here, we're looking for ideas on HOW to teach them, lol not WHAT to teach them. these are all gonna be younger kids that really need to learn the roots first. i really like the older sets idea tho, the only thing i worrie about is with some of the older sets they havnt shortend the text, like "creature can attact when it enters the battle field" instead of "haste" lol i'm not trying to confuse em. this has all been so much help tho. keep the ideas coming please!



yu're going to be teaching little kids magic? Better grab a dictionary and a couple decks from each color to let them get a feel for what they want to do.
I am Blue/Green
I am Blue/Green
Take The Magic Dual Colour Test - Beta today!
Created with Rum and Monkey's Personality Test Generator.
I am both rational and instinctive. I value self-knowledge and understanding of the world; my ultimate goal is self-improvement and improvement of the world around me. At best, I am focused and methodical; at worst, I am obsessive and amoral.
ok lemme try that again, lol not "little kids", all the kids that will be there know how to play magic and have loose idea as to how to make a deck, just not a good one i suppose. trust me tho, that thought had crossed my mind.
ok lemme try that again, lol not "little kids", all the kids that will be there know how to play magic and have loose idea as to how to make a deck, just not a good one i suppose. trust me tho, that thought had crossed my mind.



and I'm sure it terrified you. If you really want a good idea though, pull up the top eight decklists, dont tell them its the top 8, and ask them what they all have in common (other than specific cards). Thats a great way to teach, and how I learned (except it was casual forum rather than top 8 decklist)
I am Blue/Green
I am Blue/Green
Take The Magic Dual Colour Test - Beta today!
Created with Rum and Monkey's Personality Test Generator.
I am both rational and instinctive. I value self-knowledge and understanding of the world; my ultimate goal is self-improvement and improvement of the world around me. At best, I am focused and methodical; at worst, I am obsessive and amoral.
yeah that makes a lot of sense. i'm pretty sure that is something we're going to have to do at some point. should i print out the card images with it?
yeah that makes a lot of sense. i'm pretty sure that is something we're going to have to do at some point. should i print out the card images with it?



yeah. It would help them see what the abilities of the cards are.
I am Blue/Green
I am Blue/Green
Take The Magic Dual Colour Test - Beta today!
Created with Rum and Monkey's Personality Test Generator.
I am both rational and instinctive. I value self-knowledge and understanding of the world; my ultimate goal is self-improvement and improvement of the world around me. At best, I am focused and methodical; at worst, I am obsessive and amoral.
You'll be doing this weekly, right? What I'd consider is picking a deck every time - maybe bring your own deliberately badly built deck for starters - and have the group chime in with suggestions on what to do to make the deck better, all the while explaining relevant concepts as they come up. Then you can have participants volunteer their decks for 'disection'.

L1 Judge

Wahooney and Totothecat have some great ideas; perhaps a good deck and bad deck each week and let the students disect and rebuild them. 

Keep in mind that most new players only know the Standard cards, so if you stick to those, you shouldn't need to print off card images, only descriptions (I am confident that text-only spoilers are out there). 

Be sure that at least one bad deck mixes infect, mill, and regular damage in one package, with the goal being to realize that decks need ONE winning strategy that works, rather than numerous partials.

General instruction on mana-curve, EBT lands vs. nonEBT lands, how many lands to run, vanilla critters vs. critters that do things; all of of these (and other topics) can be covered in the dissection of a bad deck.

On occasion, take a Standard deck from a kid needing help (with his permission, ideally, the kid comes to you), for dissection.  Be sure to have trade time afterwards so that s/he can benefit from comments made.  Alternatively, get workshop regulars input about which color or card or overall strategy the next deck dissection to do the following week.  Actually, provide them three choices, and let them vote, otherwise, you may be overwhelmed and no one is happy. 

It occurs to me that some may need a workshop on how to build a deck for MP games, particularly FFAs.  After all, Blightning rocks in a duel, but only irritates when playing against 8 other people.

I imagine that this workshop would be a great way for you and your buddies to get rid of the bulk of your unplayed commons.  Break them down by color and offer two playsets of commons to kids for actively participating; alternatively, the students with the best input or the most marked improvement get door prizes.  I suggest this from experience: I own way too many cards, and even with 70+ decks built, I have multiple playsets of commons, uncommons, and occasionally rares.  As I meet new players, I "hook them up" by filling out playsets when possible.

They are happy with new cards, I am happy because my cards get played, my wife is happy because there are fewer cards in our house, and the group improves overall as deck quality improves, leading to more challenging games.  Win-win.

Regardless, I applaud people taking on the teaching route.

Cheers!

A shout out to Gaming Grounds in Kent, Ohio and Gamers N Geeks in Mobile, Alabama. www.zombiehunters.org for all your preparation needs. http://shtfschool.com/ - why prepping is useful, from one who has been there.
I wrote this article for my friends, but it might inspire you and your circle as well:

Show
So you want to make a Constructed deck? Follow this guide and you'll be up and running in no time.


Step 1: Find Focus


First, you have to figure out what the focus of your deck is. It could be a specific strategy you're thinking of ("I want to play a fast and aggressive deck"), a specific card that you want to build a deck around ("I want to play an Infinite Reflection deck") or just a theme that you're interested in exploring ("I want to build a deck with only cards illustrated by Raymond Swanland"). Without a focus, you don't have a deck.



For example, let's say I want to make a Dragon-themed deck that uses only cards from Magic 2012.



Step 2: Find Core Cards


After you've decided what focus you want to build around, you will want to give the card pool a once-over to see what cards are available to your strategy. Once you've seen your options, you can start thinking about the colors you want to play and what deck strategies are available to you.



Returning to our example, let's look at all the Dragons in Magic 2012:





  • Since the dragons in this set are only blue and red, my deck's colors have to include either blue or red. I decide that I'm definitely going to play red dragons, because how can I play a Dragon deck with only illusory dragons?

  • But I realize that I can't exactly have tons of six-mana spells in the deck if I want to keep it consistent, and there aren't that many Dragons in Magic 2012, so I'll be playing Phantasmal Dragon to give me a strong four-drop as well.

  • This pretty much restricts me to red-blue. I don't want to play three colors because Magic 2012 doesn't have all that many dual lands.

  • As all my Dragons are large and slow creatures, I'm inclined to play a midrange or control deck so that they can all shine.



Step 3: Find Utility Cards


Now that you have a decent idea of what deck you're going to build, you can go over other parts of the card pool that are related to your strategy and help you work towards your goal. Some cards like [Mana Leak] for blue decks or [Doom Blade] for black decks are practically auto-includes at this stage, so you can throw them in while you're sifting.



Here are some blue cards in Magic 2012 that catch my eye:



  • Phantasmal Image This is a cheap way to double up on my dragons or copy my opponent's stuff.

  • Merfolk Looter Constantly improves my hand and lets me draw the cards I need.

  • Mind Control An expensive but awesome removal spell.

  • Unsummon Helps me stall for time against decks that rely on large creatures.

  • Mana Leak The best counterspell in the set.

  • Negate Another counterspell.

  • Cancel If I need more counterspells...

  • Ponder A strong utility card that fixes up my hand.



Red cards:



  • Goblin Arsonist Stonewalls aggro by threatening to kill two creatures with one block.

  • Wall of Torches A decent defense against large creatures.

  • Circle of Flame Strong against aggro, especially in multiples.

  • Shock An old standby removal spell.

  • Incinerate The bread and butter of red.

  • Fireball A classy way to kill a large creature or finish an opponent.



Artifacts:




Step 4: Prototype


It's time to get down and dirty with a decklist. Sort through the cards you've selected and throw together the first draft of the deck. You will want to play 4 of any card you're happy to see multiples of in your opening hand, 3 of any card you want to see once or twice a game, 2 of any card you want to see once at most, and 1 of a card that it's fun to see once every few games, or that you can search for with other cards in your deck. Start by putting in the most vital cards first, then add cards to fill holes until you have a fledgling 60-card deck ready to play.



Our Dragon deck starts with the very basics. (24 cards)




We add in our finishers and core utility spells. I play fewer Dragons because Ponder lets me dig for them when I need them. (43 cards)




I'm currently weak against early rushdown, so I add some anti-aggro cards. (52 cards)




I have very few cards between 3 and 5 mana, so I decide to play some mana sinks and acceleration to make use of those few turns. I'm also weak to large creatures if I don't counter them, so Crown of Empires takes care of them as well. (60 cards)




Here's our final first-draft decklist:




Step 5: Playtest and Refine


 Now you have a rough deck that you can bring around and play against others. The keyword here is playtest, playtest, playtest. By playing with your new deck a lot, you can find out its weaknesses and flaws, so that you can go back and improve your deck to patch up those flaws later. An excellent tool is TappedOut.net's 'playtest' feature, which lets you play the first few turns of your deck solitaire so you can see if you draw the right lands or the right mix of spells early on. Playtesting against real players also gives you important information about your deck's different matchups, which is important if you want to build a sideboard for tournament play.



In our hypothetical Magic 2012-only metagame, I find out that my Dragon deck struggles against anything untargetable, be it a Gladecover Scout enchanted with Angelic Destiny or a Dungrove Elder attacking for massive damage. I also find that my Dragons are vulnerable to my opponent's counterspells and removal.



I build the following sideboard:



  • 4x Wall of Torches Against green decks that have large creatures but no removal.

  • 4x Flashfreeze Against red and green decks, obviously.

  • 4x Azure Mage Thwarts control decks by pressuring them early on, aggro-control style.

  • 3x Tectonic Rift To slow down opposing decks that rely on having lots of mana.



Slowly but surely, I refine my blue-red Dragon deck, take the first prize at FNM and feel really good about myself. (You can go look at sexy card images at tappedout.net/mtg-decks/2012-dragon-cont....) What's next?



Step 6: Win at Grand Prix, Become World Champion


 Okay, you probably won't reach this level any time soon. But tips like these are useful to know and can be applied to any deck idea. Once you have the hang of deckbuilding, it becomes much easier to express yourself and play exactly the way you want to play (not to mention I don't have to build decks for you guys all the time anymore). Deckbuilding is half the fun of Magic, and I hope you can enjoy it as much as I do.



Thanks for reading.

Embrace imagination. Lord of YMtC | Ten Rounds Contest Winner Solphos – A fan set with a 'combo matters' theme Fool's Gold – The second set of the Solphos block
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Each of its nine tails is imbued with supernatural power, and it can live for a thousand years. My Standard deck: Setting Sun
108516289 wrote:
Think of how Neo couldn't beat the robots, but they kept him around anyways to defeat Agent Smith. Sure, the robots might not like having a Neo running rampant because instead of playing their favorite 4 drop fatty robot, they have to play a bunch of one mana Matrixs to contain him, but at least Neo keeps Agent Smith from reanimating an Iona on turn two.
139359831 wrote:
Are you saying I'm trying to blame my loss on something? I don't care that I lost, I care that he's a sore loser, and a cheater, and a liar.
144902215 wrote:
CKY, are you bad at anything?
144902215 wrote:
I really enjoy imagining this from Kevin's perspective. Because in Kevin's world, Rosewater actually reads everything he types. Mark is sitting there right now, reading this, and thinking "The greatest trick the devil ever pulled. . ." Or some such. He chuckles low, then clicks on "The Best Of KEVINSET" and says "Yes, this'll do just fine. A busty lady with banding who deals direct damage to Zones!? Why this will be the star of my next set, and no one will ever believe you Kevin." Then he closes his Macbook, so his servant may move it out of the way, while another servant puts a Fetal Richard Garfield Clone lathered in Steak Sauce in front of him. Then Mark Feasts. I mean, In KevinWorld, Mark is reading the very words I'm typing as well. Heck, in KevinWorld maybe I am Mark.
99964981 wrote:
I'm beginning to think CKY may be anime in real life...
57150868 wrote:
Don't go anywhere CKY, I need to crash dramatically through your window and propose marriage and I don't want you throwing off my paradrop.
63588923 wrote:
[In response to a thread about how hard grading is] Upon reading this, I've found myself completely unable to operate in the world. I tried to decide what to eat for breakfast, and pondered the vast consequences of my choice. How do I balance my dietary needs against my desire to eat good-tasting food? Should I factor in how long it takes to prepare? Cereal is ready in moments, but bacon takes longer to cook. Then there is the impact on other industries. Do people in the cereal industry deserve to be employed more than people in the bacon industry? Which industry should I support? I don't even have the data regarding HOW MUCH the cereal industry benefits from me eating a bowl of cereal, or how much the bacon industry benefits from me eating a side of bacon. How can I compare two qualities I can't even quantify? And let's not forget the milk on the cereal. In addition to determining whether or not milk is healthy for me, how much that benefits the milk industry, and how much the people in the milk industry deserve my support, we have to factor in the fact that cows are put under brutal conditions in order to collect thier milk. Of course, the same goes for the pigs, and then they get killed. Of course, I really like bacon. So I need to come up with a scale that compares the value of cow happiness to pig happiness to my happiness. What trade-offs am I willing to make here? Does the fact that the pig gets put out of its misery count as a plus or a minus? Isn't bacon bad for me anyway? Deciding what to eat for breakfast (or any meal) is impossible. Help me!
104339228 wrote:
I must admit chinkeeyong, you have the most interesting character ideas; and you play them well.
144902215 wrote:
Anyway, you'd be surprised about Time Stop. When I first saw that card as a relatively new player I didn't see its full potential until I read the reminder text. Is it that unintuitive, though? Mine I mean. What is possibility? Is it possible for me to type these words with my tusks? No, because I don't have tusks. Although I am now tempted to go buy some - obviously not from poachers or whatever - and use them as typing apparatus. I could be the best secretary ever. "What's your words per minute sir?" "Well, only six, but I use these tusks to type them." "You're hired!" That was the interview. And is anyone else disappointed that "apparati" is not the plural form of apparatus? I just could strangle a dictionary, because "apparatuses" is a real word. I guess it sounds pretty cool. I'll call them my Apparatusks.
Oh wow, i had to read all that a few times over cuz there was so much helpful info in all those posts! yeha the "bad deck" idea is a REALLY good one. and yes we have more xtra cards than we really even know what to do with, we had all been talking about ways to, as you said "hook them up" but wernt sure how to do so without seeming unfair.

and yes, we will be doing this every week!

and thank you very much for the link!


what  else you all got=) ?

deff keep it coming, this all has been so much help!
They should also understand the art of deception. For instance, if your opponent sees a Galvanic Blast, they'll think "artifacts". You lose nothing by playing it over Shock, but the Blast can misdirect them. Depending on how many artifacts you actually have, this illusion can shatter relatively quickly.
139359831 wrote:
Clever deduction Watson! Maybe you can explain why Supergirl is trying to kill me.
---- Autocard is your friend. Lightning Bolt = Lightning Bolt
yeah that is deff the kinda thing i wanna go over with them a little later is the workshop. i know it's older, but lets not forget Ninjutsu, that mind effs people with the quickness lol
As you're asking for ways how to do it... Bring a white-board and a dry erase marker and have them design a very basic deck archetype in current standard. Just tell them "we're going to build white weenie together,"(or sligh or blue permissions or green beats, whatever) and have them shout out all the cards they think should go in it. Write everything down in the order they name the cards, and then you go after the deck building skills/tenants with them while putting it together (on the white board.)
After you have all of their cards on there, rewrite them in ascending order of mana costs and talk about the curve. Help them weed out some of the higher costed creatures that don't work in a fast aggro deck. then go through them all and pick (always with them) out the "aggro" cards you want to keep and the control cards that won't work as well with your white weenie deck. You can go through again and talk about "win more" cards, or anything that applies really. After you've got the list narrowed down to something managable, you help em go through and figure out the numbers of each card you want to include and make choices about keeping/cutting cards.  You're there to guide them through it but not make the decisions.
If you can get them engaged in it it should be fun and keep them interested, it's all just brainstorming and they won't get to actually fish or play the deck but it seems easily manageable. 
I had a few more thoughts.

Use a precon as the "bad deck."  I say this as I have often used precons as the skeleton of decent decks.  This gives you ready-made decklists and if some of the students have that precon, you have helped them all the more by keeping the class relevant to them.    

Another thought is to take a comboish card or mechanic in Standard and help them build a deck around it.  Kind of like the GMADs (Group Make A Deck) on MTGSalvation.

As for how to fairly share out extra cards, separate them by color and let kids go through them.  Just set a number on how many cards each kid can take, either per color or total.  Supervise it so that no one walks off with ten copies of the same card.  I have found that people are generally pretty good at policing themselves, though, and will keep the free stuff to what they need.

Cheers!
A shout out to Gaming Grounds in Kent, Ohio and Gamers N Geeks in Mobile, Alabama. www.zombiehunters.org for all your preparation needs. http://shtfschool.com/ - why prepping is useful, from one who has been there.
both of those are alot of help, i like the board idea, that sounds like a week two idea for sure! and yeah i hasve no problem hooken em up, a guidelie liek that helps alot! what else you all got?
MIKIE32511:

Teach them the power of weenie!

Brew something like 16 lands and 44 mons's goblin raiders.

Play it suicidal and beat them with it.

when you eventually start to lose, start beefing up the deck by putting better creatures in it.

Make it blue and let everything have evasive abilities.

Try out white lifegainers with a bit of evasion as well.

Try black with insane 2/2 creatures of every kind for just B mana.
(try out the 16 land, 4 dark ritual, 40 1cc creatures)

That should teach them to build faster decks or decks with mass-removal



Aditional, if they start to favor this type of deck you can amaze them by stretching the limits of what is possible.

If they play 16 lands and 44 creatures you switch over to playing with 10 lands and 50 creatures!

They will get ahead for a while due to a faster mana, but then you overtake them by having a superior number of creatures.

The lesson will be best if all players have ability-less creatures in this setup.
(Use token-cards instead if you do not have enough creatures on your own)

Also see what happens if they start to build such a deck with 2 or more colors.
that sounds pretty good, but like i said b4, we're tryig to keep it simple at the start.
Out of curiousity, how does using only cards illustrated by Raymond Swanland constitute a focus?

Orzhova Witness

Restarting Quotes Block
58086748 wrote:
58335208 wrote:
Disregard women acquire chase rares.
There are a lot of dudes for whom this is not optional.
97820278 wrote:
144532521 wrote:
How;s a 2 drop 1/2, Flying broken? What am I missing?
You're missing it because *turns Storm Crows sideways* all your base are belong to Chuck Norris and every other overused meme ever.
Out of curiousity, how does using only cards illustrated by Raymond Swanland constitute a focus?



A focus on the artist?
My decks, mostly casuals, but some I use online with some small changes: http://www.mtgvault.com/Profile.aspx?UserID=91484
JUSTTERRORIT:

My guess would be that it focusses your deckbuilding talent by restricting your choices.
The narrower your opportunities, the more skilled you will have to be ???

My guess would be that it focusses your deckbuilding talent by restricting your choices.


While this just may be true in some (rare) cases, people that are learning or being taught to build a deck have no "deckbuilding talent" to speak of. I don't think the concept of "artist" is a good deckbuilding focus to teach people learning to build Magic decks. One is better off just playing Sealed.
The narrower your opportunities, the more skilled you will have to be ???


Yes, in light of Draft and Sealed, this is true. But focusing on something that has nothing to do with the concepts of the game (artist, cards that start with a certain letter, cards with only one line of flavor text) should not be included in methodologies of deckbuilding when teaching someone how to build a deck.

Now if a few experienced players got together and said, "You build a deck using only cards whose names contain all the letters of your favorite brand of cigarettes, and I'll build a deck using only cards whose names contain all the letters of my favorite generic brand of Similac", then sure, it can be done, but really just for the challenge (so to speak). Teaching in this manner, though, should be avoided.

Orzhova Witness

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58086748 wrote:
58335208 wrote:
Disregard women acquire chase rares.
There are a lot of dudes for whom this is not optional.
97820278 wrote:
144532521 wrote:
How;s a 2 drop 1/2, Flying broken? What am I missing?
You're missing it because *turns Storm Crows sideways* all your base are belong to Chuck Norris and every other overused meme ever.
justterrorit:

the concept of handicapping yourself to become more creative  is rarely usefull, except when r&d bans new cards. appart from that, it's just a mental discipline, but then again, discipline needs constant effort to be maintained!

I agree that to base it on something out of the game mechanics like artists is a bit weird!