[LoW] Lords of Waterdeep is incredible...

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The folks over at boardgamegeek.com are raving about this game for good reason.  If you have not tried it, please give it a shot. 

I hope they decide to give it an expansion.  It really deserves one and I think it could turn the game from a 10 to an 11.   
D&D & Boardgames If I have everything I need to run great games for many years without repeating stuff, why do I need to buy anything right now?
Agreed.  LoW is simply amazing.  I own 63 board games.  Lords of Waterdeep is my favorite and the only 10 in my collection.

Myztek, I expect an expansion.  Pictures of their playtesting showed some kind of Skullport section on the board.  Also, there is room for a 6th player on the main board, which they already mentioned was intended for an expansion.

Celebrate our differences.

I'll add my voice to this.  I'm a life-long board game lover.  I consider LoW one of the best games I've ever played, if not the best.  I'm trying not to say the best because it's fresh in my mind and I want to see how it plays over time, but everything about it is awesome.  I also really enjoy how the game changes quite a bit depending on the number of people playing.  I've played with 2, 3, and 5 players and the dynamic has been different with each group.

I really, really, really hope this gets an expansion with a 6th player, new cards, new lord, new buildings, etc.  It would refresh the game after awhile. 
In the short amount of time it has been out, Lords of Waterdeep has climbed to number 60 (and is still climbing) on BoardGameGeek's complete board game list.  This is an impressive feat in and of itself, considering that BGG is a standard that is used frequently in the board game community.  The popularity is well deserved.  Rodney Thompson and Peter Lee deserve all the kudos they receive.

Celebrate our differences.

My wife really likes it, and I'm glad it can be played with two players. (Most games require 3, which isn't always easy to find.)

My only "gripe" would be the cubes. The mechanic is fine, and the cubes themselves are fine, it's just that they're supposed to represent classes. I'm trying to imagine sending two fighters, a cleric, a mage and two rogues into a dungeon, but instead "I'm turning in a quest with two orange, one white, one purple and two black."

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Of the two approaches to hobby games today, one is best defined as the realism-simulation school and the other as the game school. AD&D is assuredly an adherent of the latter school. It does not stress any realism (in the author's opinon an absurd effort at best considering the topic!). It does little to attempt to simulate anything either. (AD&D) is first and foremost a game for the fun and enjoyment of those who seek the use of imagination and creativity.... In all cases, however, the reader should understand that AD&D is designed to be an amusing and diverting pastime, something which an fill a few hours or consume endless days, as the participants desire, but in no case something to be taken too seriously. For fun, excitement and captivating fantasy, AD&D is unsurpassed.As a realistic simulation of things from the realm of make-believe or even as a reflection of midieval or ancient warfare or culture or society, it can be deemed only a dismal failure. Readers who seek the later must search elsewhere. - Gary Gygax. 1e DMG.
I'll be honest.  I'd never played a European-style game before.  And, to be even more honest, they really didn't interest me.  I didn't care about trading wood for sheep.  I didn't care about building roads.

Then, I watched Wil Wheaton's Tabletop show.  In the first episode, they played Smallworld.  It looked really fun as they played it.  I had looked this game over in the store, but passed on it, thinking it looked boring.  But seeing those guys play that game made me want to play it.

Then I remembered that WotC had made a Euro-style D&D game.  I downloaded the rulebook and started reading the articles about it.  That night, I ordered Lords of Waterdeep.  I've only played twice so far, against the same one person (losing both times, sadly), but I really want to get a nice 4- or 5-person game going to see how that plays out.

Since then, my friend to whom I showed that episode of Tabletop bought Smallworld, and we've played it.  It's just as fun as Wil and the others made it out to be.

Now, I'm looking into picking up Settlers of Catan and maybe even Carcassone.  All because of Wil Wheaton's indirectly pointing me to Lords of Waterdeep.

And now, when I watch The Big Bang Theory, I finally understand the basis behind the double entendres when Sheldon, Raj and Howard are playing Settlers.
I'll add my voice to this. I like playing board games but I usually don't purchase them for myself. After listening to one of the D&D next podcasts, the second half of which included an interview with a dev involved in LoW, I made an exception to my no-purchasing board games policy because the premise of the game intrigued me so much. I haven't regretted the purchase and an expansion would be very nice.

thewok: I'll also recommend Settlers of Catan, it's a fun little game.
Tell me more about this game.

I've seen the box in the store and it looks okay, but you guys are making me think it must be a lot better than just okay. What makes it so cool?

Marv (Finarvyn) Master of Mutants (MA and GW) Playing 5E D&D and liking it! OD&D player since 1975

The idea is to simulate you as a Lord of Waterdeep, sending out agents to recruit adventureres and completing quests. It's a points game, and you score points by doing quests as well as other methods.

It's fairly easy to understand as well. Once you know what the symbols are, it's very quick to pick up. The rules give full description on how to play a space, for example, but just by looking at the board, I know that one particular space lets me recruit two fighters.

Each round you place one of your agents on an available location, and gain the benefit from that location. Most of the time only one person can claim a space, (There are two locations that have three available spaces.) and there are "buildings" of other locations you can purchase. You mark these owned spaces and collect a benifit when someone other than you selects the space. So if the space gives two gold, if you own the space you would also gain a gold.

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Of the two approaches to hobby games today, one is best defined as the realism-simulation school and the other as the game school. AD&D is assuredly an adherent of the latter school. It does not stress any realism (in the author's opinon an absurd effort at best considering the topic!). It does little to attempt to simulate anything either. (AD&D) is first and foremost a game for the fun and enjoyment of those who seek the use of imagination and creativity.... In all cases, however, the reader should understand that AD&D is designed to be an amusing and diverting pastime, something which an fill a few hours or consume endless days, as the participants desire, but in no case something to be taken too seriously. For fun, excitement and captivating fantasy, AD&D is unsurpassed.As a realistic simulation of things from the realm of make-believe or even as a reflection of midieval or ancient warfare or culture or society, it can be deemed only a dismal failure. Readers who seek the later must search elsewhere. - Gary Gygax. 1e DMG.
My wife really likes it, and I'm glad it can be played with two players. (Most games require 3, which isn't always easy to find.)

My only "gripe" would be the cubes. The mechanic is fine, and the cubes themselves are fine, it's just that they're supposed to represent classes. I'm trying to imagine sending two fighters, a cleric, a mage and two rogues into a dungeon, but instead "I'm turning in a quest with two orange, one white, one purple and two black."



I have to say, I've really enjoyed it myself, but found maybe a little that this issue affects me.  I think more of an issue is completely ignoring the building names and flavour - all the buildings tend to be just 'the building that gives a fighter and an any', for instance.  Except, for some reason, the intrigue-card building.

Overall, I think it hits a good spot for me.  Complex enough, but not too complex.  Flavourful enough, but not to a diverting extent.  Strategic and tactical.  I'm not certain of the balance, though - the building lord in particular is very, very swingy - the other lords always stand a reasonable chance of getting what they need, but the building lord can go from crazy-good to just lame depending on whether the very few building-related plot quests come out at the right times.

I'd love to see expansions (probably, the only way to do it would be to add a new quest type and a new adventurer type, though - making lords based on any other resources would be hellish hard to balance.

Great game though, more like this please.
Harrying your Prey, the Easy Way: A Hunter's Handbook - the first of what will hopefully be many CharOp efforts on my part. The Blinker - teleport everywhere. An Eladrin Knight/Eldritch Knight. CB != rules source.
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