Your 'Favorite' and 'Least Favorite' Thing about 4e

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Dear Forum Users,

I created this thread because I thought it would be interesting to see what people's favorite and least favorite things about 4e are. You only have to write one thing you like, and one thing you don't; but feel free to post as many "pros" and "cons" as you want.

I'm looking forward to hearing your replies.

***

Favorite thing about 4e: the power system: Daily, Encounter, and At-will.
Least Favorite thing about 4e: lack of some of the multitude of spells built up in 3e.

***update April 16th 2012***

Just thought I'd give you all a recap of what most people have been saying so far:

4e Cons sum up: Magic Items are too crazy, Rituals implementation, Feats too mechanical, too many effects stacking up in combat, too many interrupts, combats too formulaic, no out of combat flexibility, and too many number increases at higher levels which makes combat slower.

4e Pros sum up: Encounter Building, Monster Building, The Power System (most people like it, some favor Essentials) All PCs being equal and more balanced, tighter and more flexible system, clear page layout and formatting.

4e Splits (some people like, some don't): Essentials, Skill Challenges, The skill system in general, Healing System, and Status Effects.

Hope that helps you guys!

--David L. Dostaler
Author, Challenger RPG a Free Roleplaying Game
www.amazon.com/Challenger-Free-Roleplayi...
David L. Dostaler Author, Challenger RPG (free)
Wow, only one favorite thing? Okay, let me think.....

I would say the Power System (though I've grown more fond of the Essentials version as time has passed)

Least Favorite would be the Ritual System. I get the idea, but the separation (they way it was handled) of Combat and Non-Combat spells seems artificial and forced to me.
Favorite is the four defenses, armor, fortitude, reflex and will. It creates a system where different classes or different powers are better against different monsters. It creates a new layer of strategy both in character creation and in play.

Least favorite is the over-abundance of status effects. They get cumbersome when they start to pile up, and make it hard for a DM to maintain the threat in monsters.
Favorite : Parity. Which is a function of the power system.

Least : Magic Items. A situation made even worse by the introduction of the half-arsed rarity system. A lot of lower level items and low level enhnacements need to die instead of just being carried up to +6 low powered benefit
Wow, only one favorite thing? Okay, let me think.....

I would say the Power System (though I've grown more fond of the Essentials version as time has passed)

Least Favorite would be the Ritual System. I get the idea, but the separation (they way it was handled) of Combat and Non-Combat spells seems artificial and forced to me.



Dammit, you stole my answers.
Favorite : Parity. Which is a function of the power system.

Least : Magic Items. A situation made even worse by the introduction of the half-arsed rarity system. A lot of lower level items and low level enhnacements need to die instead of just being carried up to +6 low powered benefit



Pretty much this.


Rituals are hard to remember exist sometimes, making them hard to care enough to consider them 'least favourite'. Doesn't help that new castery classes dont even get it as a bonus feat.


Magic items are generally in your  face and showing how bad they are most the time. Waaaay too many items have really weak daily powers and its all they do, and they take up space all the way to epic tier. As a DM I hate sifting through them, and I know my players don't like having to either.


The item rarity system added on top doesn't care about power or actual usefulness, just how "cool" or "rare" the designers think it should be.  
my favorite thing about 4e is probably the fact that it lets everyone feel awesome, no matter what class or race they play.

least favorite thing would be how formulaic most fights end up being.
Hard to limit to just one of each.

I like that overall they have done a very good job at making PCs consistently useful.  I have never seen a PC that wasn't at least a decent addition to the group and I have seen about a 100 different PCs in play at this point.  Sure some have been more useful than others, but all have contributed something.  You can build for some random combo or concept and there is a really good chance it will at least be decent.

Magic items are frustratingly underpowered or overpowered.  I am playing a level 30 warden soon for a one shot and was adding items last night.  Multiple times the high epic ones were not much better than than the paragon tier ones.  In a lot of cases they had one situational daily power vs a constant good property or good encounter power from a lower level one.  Except for my neck/weapon/armor slots I don't think I went with a single item over level 23 or so and had close to a million gold left over with nothing tempting besides some wondrous items.  And things like iron armbands of power always seem to be the best choice for a lot of builds, but that seems like a boring choice and expensive if I go for the epic tier ones.
Favorite thing is easy: The balance.  No more broken spellcasters and useless warriors.  Everybody gets to contribute and be cool.

Least Favorite: Probably the whole 'magic items required for math' thing, but Inherent Bonuses solves that problem quite well.
Another day, another three or four entries to my Ignore List.
Wow, only one favorite thing? Okay, let me think.....

I would say the Power System (though I've grown more fond of the Essentials version as time has passed)

Least Favorite would be the Ritual System. I get the idea, but the separation (they way it was handled) of Combat and Non-Combat spells seems artificial and forced to me.



Dammit, you stole my answers.

Great minds thinking alike and such...
Favorites:
1. Monster design - being easy for the DM, and having unique abilities different from characters
2. Primal power for Druids

Un-favorites:
1. The whole power AEDU system
2. The whole healing surge mechanic
"If it's not a conjuration, how did the wizard con·jure/ˈkänjər/Verb 1. Make (something) appear unexpectedly or seemingly from nowhere as if by magic. it?" -anon "Why don't you read fire·ball / fī(-ə)r-ˌbȯl/ and see if you can find the key word con.jure /'kən-ˈju̇r/ anywhere in it." -Maxperson
Favourite: The robust mechanical/mathematical framework of the system, that lets me use the exact same challenges against a level X party consisting of classes A, B, C, and D as I do against a level X party of classes E, F, G and H, and makes it simple and easy to alter those challenges for a party of level Y.

Least Favourite: The excessive inflation of numbers with level, especially monster hitpoints (which make combats take too long) and the ever-widening difference between a character's class primary abilities and those that are not relevant to his/her class (which makes it impossible for characters to be good at 'off-stat' skills at higher levels - e.g. a fighter who is also a historian/scholar just doesn't work beyond the heroic tier).

"My flying carpet is full of elves."

Most Favorite (general): Balance
In 4e, for the first time ever in D&D, when asked what class I want to play, I do not need to ask for the campaign level. I do not need to worry about being the party tag-along or spotlight hog. And despite the existence of Role in the game, I do not need to be too concerned with what other players have chosen. 4e lets me play my favorite classes at any level in any campaign. This most favorite part of 4e is the "whole" that is the result of lots of really incredible "parts" - AEDU, powers, parallel advancement, stat structure, skill simplification, etc.

Most Favorite (specific): Action Economy
I love the Standard, Move, Minor, Interrupt/Reactions, and Free action set-up of the game. On my turn, I know I get a Standard, Move, and Minor action. I appreciate that I can build a character that will act between his turns almost every round. I have enjoyed playing a rogue that is built around immediate actions and a warlord that is almost completely minor-action-oriented.

Least Favorite (implementation): Rituals
More specifically, the rituals were a bit too underplayed because they were underdeveloped. I think they were a great idea that got treated like the ugly duckling because they were overshadowed by too many other great ideas. And like the ugly duckling, I think it would take very little to turn them into the swan they can become.

Least Favorite (mechanics): +X Magic Items
I hate (as strong a word as that is) the +1 magic sword. I have used inherent bonuses even before the designers added them simply to eliminate the "must advance" approach to the weapon/armor/neck slot requirements the game math imposed. Let a magic sword be important because it is magic, not because it *must* be owned.
Here are the PHB essentia, in my opinion:
  • Three Basic Rules (p 11)
  • Power Types and Usage (p 54)
  • Skills (p178-179)
  • Feats (p 192)
  • Rest and Recovery (p 263)
  • All of Chapter 9 [Combat] (p 264-295)
A player needs to read the sections for building his or her character -- race, class, powers, feats, equipment, etc. But those are PC-specific. The above list is for everyone, regardless of the race or class or build or concept they are playing.
lots of favorites, and a handful of dislikes but I will go with:

Favorite - I could almost distill it to "the Warlord," but the root of it is that I like that 4E allows you to make martial characters that can really contribute, particularly at high level where they traditionally got overshadowed.

Least Favorite - magic items.  I like 4E's philosophy that the character should be the star of the show and not his equipment list, so I'm OK with the math-required plusses on the weapon/implement/armor/neck pieces, but the vast majority of attached item powers present as completely impotent.  They don't feel magic and powerful.  Daily powers tend to never get used because they are either really niche-y and rarely come up, or are good but the players hate to think they wasted their single use too early on something and instead never use it on anything.  Properties, overall, are bland and uninspiring and just nickel and dime bonuses up.  The entire Waist slot feels like a barren wasteland of mediocre choices (sooo many epic characters wearing Viper Belts fer crissakes), with Hands and Arm slots not far behind. 

Finding a good magic item should be an event, but too many of them just fall flat.  It does neatly explain why most of them only sell for 20% of list though 

INSIDE SCOOP, GAMERS: In the new version of D&D, it will no longer be "Edition Wars." It will be "Edition Lair Assault." - dungeonbastard

Best: The clear layout and page format of adventures and encounters. No longer a wall of black and white text, but information formatted into sections, and detail on how to run the encounters.

Worst: The number of status effects in combat, it gets really confusing keeping track of them. 
The perception that there are a lot of status effects interests me.  Is it because it is they are more readily available to more classes and thus fewer effects are applied more often in combat, or is it that there appears to actually be too many?

I really appreciated the drastic reduction and consildation of status effects from 3.X to 4E, particularly the removal of the Sickened, Tired, and Scared tracks.  Could never seem to memorize whether Nauseated was more debilitating than Sickened, would I rather be Panicked or Frightened or if I could be both Fatigued and Exhausted.

INSIDE SCOOP, GAMERS: In the new version of D&D, it will no longer be "Edition Wars." It will be "Edition Lair Assault." - dungeonbastard

Favorites:
1. Monster design - being easy for the DM, and having unique abilities different from characters
2. Primal power for Druids

Un-favorites:
1. The whole power AEDU system
2. The whole healing surge mechanic




I gotta disagree on the healing mechanics.  4e's hp mechanics are the fantastic.  Self-recovery, not needing a cleric or a bag of wands/potions, and most importantly how surges are the limiting resource that defines the adventuring day.  Surges are where the tension comes in 4e, not how many more fireballs the wizard has left.  So I'll put the hp mechanic (wouldn't call it health or healing because its more abstract than that) up as my favorite, because balance has already been mention many times. I do love the balance and everyone being effective, but wish skill and non-combat abilities were more balance.


Least favorite, sometime the math is way too transparent - you have to pick x feats, need x magic items, encounter math can be very predictable, and, as mention, combat becomes very formulaic.


TjD

so this insight came from playtesting....other systems...

my absolute favorite thing about 4e is the uncoupling of fluff and mechanics.  4e presented more mechanical rules than any prior edition, in order to create a balanced game that relies less on dm fiat to function that earlier editions. At the same time, 4e did not try to impose rules on non-combat situations that didn't need them, and explicitly gives instructions on how to re-flavor powers, items, even entire classes to fit a character concept.  This gives unparalleled freedom to roleplay whatever you want, without breaking the game.

my least favorite thing is power and item bloat.  fighters dont need 30 power choices at each level, nor do i want to sort through hundreds of really bad items to find the cool ones. when a dm hands out a really terrible item as a reward, it feels like an insult.
Favorite thing:
AEDU: It puts everyone on the same level, with reguards to liniar fighters, quadratic Wizards, but it still allows each class to play differently, if you can get past "Zomg! Fighters have powers now!" Wizards are renowned for their amazing Daily powers, and that calls back to the Vancian system of previous editions, without forcing them to use their fireball, then sit around shooting their crossbow for the rest of the day. Fighters can not only just swing their sword each time, but they can do stuff like tactical positioning at-will, and still have a big cinematic Huge blow to use once a day, against the BBEG.

Least Favorite thing:
Out of combat utility: The one thing that actually keeps me from completely giving up 3.x/Pathfinder is that I feel like out of combat there's little that distinguishes classes. Sure the thief can disarm traps, and the fighter can break down doors, and the Wizard is the go to Encyclopedia, but I wish there was a little more to it than that.

Least Favorite thing (II):
[Insert Blank here] Taxes: Feats should be bonuses for characters to pick up, and it shouldn't be that a character lags behind simply because they picked up a cool feat, instead of a +1/2/3 to attack feat. Similarly, I don't like magic items to be expected to scale. Take for example King Arthur. He didn't pick up a new sword, every time he needed a bigger bonus. He just got a (arguably non-magic, but even if it was magic, it was probably just +1) sword from the stone, and then upgraded to Excaliber. But he never put down Excaliber, because suddenly he was paragon Tier, and he needed a +3 Greatsword.

I am currently raising funds to run for President in 2016. Too many administrations have overlooked the international menace, that is Carmen Sandiego. I shall devote any and all necessary military resources to bring her to justice.

Favorite: Anyone can play any class anywhere any time and generally not be suckass. ;)

Biggest Drawback: Decentralized printing of "cool stuff".  Basically, the need or percieved need to print something in every book that people want or might want to drive sales instead of assuring that each book had the highest quality stuff.  For example, did you know you could find prices for mundane trade goods in the Draconomicon I?  Or that Phoenix Feathers can be used in a Raise Dead ritual to bring back somone who's been dead for a year?  Or that Cocktrice Feathers can cure petrification when made into a poultice?  What about the idea of using trap/hazzard layout for hauntings due to their centralized location? 
I mean, on the plus side it means every book is cool.  On the minus side, most of those things, those great ideas are in "DM" books; Monster Manuals and their kin, Plane or area specific books, etc.  Those things should be located within easy reach of players, and as I understand it, the MMs and the like are not usually intended for Player reading.  Instead, these ideas should be within easy reach of the players.  Much like Essentials did with suggested improvisation for skills, these flavourful things should be provided within, for example, the list of conditions, or within ritual descriptions.  Or the Compendium online should link back to these ideas.  Something other than having to go hunting through books to find them, I guess.
"I don't know the key to success, but the key to failure is trying to please everybody." --Bill Cosby (1937- ) Vanador: OK. You ripped a gateway to Hell, killed half the town, and raised the dead as feral zombies. We're going to kill you. But it can go two ways. We want you to run as fast as you possibly can toward the south of the town to draw the Zombies to you, and right before they catch you, I'll put an arrow through your head to end it instantly. If you don't agree to do this, we'll tie you this building and let the Zombies rip you apart slowly. Dimitry: God I love being Neutral. 4th edition is dead, long live 4th edition. Salla: opinionated, but commonly right.
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quote author=56832398 post=519321747]Considering DnD is a game wouldn't all styles be gamist?[/quote]
fave-you can get creative w classes that have a variety of choices from level one. also the dynamic combat that sets it apart. the core world is awesome too, doesnt get enough credit

least fave-skill challenges and item rarity are pretty amazing failures, but i think the lack of high level support is my least fave. the poor balance as well as the lack of quality support
favorite: arcane at-wills.  I have played a 1e Wizard who had one Magic Missile ... ALL DAY.  And had to wave a dagger around while wearing a robe and worrying about his 1 HP, the rest of the time.  Finally I can contribute something wizard-ly to the second fight, and the third, &c.

least favorite: the broken math.  Most people say "math fix" or "feat tax" here, but you wouldn't have to pay the tax if the math had been set up balanced in the first place.  If I pick up a +to-hit feat it should be because I want to be a sniper, not because the rules won't let me hit the broadside of a barn without it.  If I pick up a +damage feat it should be to indicate that I put out Haymakers (not Punches) as my normal blow, not because it'll take 10 turns to get through the DM's big bag of HPs otherwise.  There are feats like Linguist or Fast Runner that sound like fun at the table but I can't fit onto my character, darn it.

Best complements I have yet received:

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Making it up as I go along:

{BRJN} If I was writing the Tome of Lore, I would let Auppenser sleep. But I also would have him dream. In his dreaming he re-activates the innate powers of (some) mortal minds. Or his dreaming changes the nature of reality - currently very malleable thanks to Spellplague &c. Or whatever really cool flavor text and pseudo-science explanation people react positively to.

{Lord_Karsus} You know, I like that better than the explanations for the Spellplague.

 

Prepped ahead of time:

I started the thread "1001 Failed Interrogation Results" (which seems to have faded into that great electronic goodnight, alas)

{ADHadh} These are all good and make sense! I just can't come up with something that's not covered here and is not completely ridiculous.

 

My 4e characters:

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Active:

LFR Half-elf StarLock8 Gondolin Nightstar

AoA Dwarf Guardian Druid8 Narvik from House Wavir

Character Ready-to-go:

Neverwinter Dwarven Invoker / Heir of Delzoun, worships Silvanus (!) "Truenamer" - speaks Words of Creation

Concepts I'm kicking around:

"Buggy" Wizard - insect flavor on everything.  His DMPC version is going to become a Lamia.  Becauae lichdom is so cliche.

Halfling Tempest Fighter - just because nobody else is doing it

Shifter Beast-o-phile Druid - for Nentir Vale campaign

Most favorite thing: Balance.  The balance is such that I can play fun concepts without worrying about whether I can contribute as was problematic in earlier editions and other games. 


Least Favorite: The magic items.  Most characters have similar items, which has happened since early in the edition.    
Favorite as a Player: The power system. I love that spellcasters always have -something- useful to contribute, and that they don't eventually completely overshadow non-casters. I love that non-spellcasters have cool stuff to do that isn't "I hit it with my axe."

Least favorite as a Player: The excessive proliferation of feats and magic items. A search on the Compendium shows 3,218 feats and 3,586 items (most of which are magic, not all though). I do -not- want to have to slog through thousands of options every time I choose a feat or item.



Favorite as a DM: Ease of encounter setup. It is incredibly easy to build encounters of an appropriate difficulty (whether that be high, normal or low) in 4E.

Least favorite as a DM: The excess of interrupt powers. In my experience, immediate interrupts become the biggest drag on the speed of combat encounters as levels get higher. Don't get me wrong, I like some interrupts. Opportunity Attacks are fine, as are defender mechanics. But when several characters have interrupt powers that can potentially negate a hit, combat becomes a slog of either double checking after every monster attack to see if it is interrupted, or being halfway through applying damage before somebody realizes they could have negated the hit.
Favorite: Much like most other people on the thread, I like how balanced the game is. 4E is easily my favorite version of D&D ever.

Dislike: Honestly, if I get started on my dislikes, I'd end up writing a book. Heh, I know I said this is my favorite version of D&D, but maybe that's why I'm so critical of it.

To state just one critique... um, I'll go with powercreep. The fact that monks effectively get twice as many powers as everyone else has lead me to ban them from my game, for example.

Also, feats annoy the frick out of me.

Dammit, I need to stop griping...
Favorite:  Tough choice, as powers, surges, and many other innovations are all great, but I'll have to go with the unified class progressions.  When someone does the impossible (and bringing even a modicum of class balance to D&D has always seemed impossible), you have to give them credit for it.

Least Favorite:  Essentials.

 

 

 

Oops, looks like this request tried to create an infinite loop. We do not allow such things here. We are a professional website!

Favorite: Skill challenges.  These are quite simply, amazing, when you step outside of the restricted methods that the DMG suggests and use a more organic approach to them.

Honorable Mention:  Encounter building and monster building.  Every part in these processes are elegant and fluid.  5E needs to maintain this.
 
Least Favorite:  Magic items, for pretty much all the reasons presented already.  I am at least glad that I have the option to remove them from being a necessary component.

 

Celebrate our differences.

Favorite/ There's a few here. Class balance, Designing encounters and adventures is easy and fun, consolidated simple skills.

Least Favorite/ Skill challenges and the lands of southern Faerun in Forgotten Realms.
Favorite Aspects: Class abilities, Rituals (when they're used), Refined and condensed skills, and racial powers.

Least-Favorite Aspects: All defenses (these scale too uniformly, and the +1s on even levels feels like contrived math), saving throws (55% success rate on all saves is a bit too anticlimatic), magical items (magic-item levels, encounter or daily-use powers, and underwhelming utility make Inherent Bonuses a better option; they're less confusing!), and drawn-out combat (why, oh why, do enemies have so many hit points?  In an effort to make combat less deadly, this edition has made combat a war of attrition).  

Things I'm on the fence about: Healing Surges, non-divine healers (I'm looking at you, Warlord, and your encouraging words that bind wounds as effectively as a deity), and the overall approach to magic (I like 4E magic, but I am, at times, upset when a fireball fails to kill a group of orcs; that seems inherently wrong).
Dear Forum Users,

I created this thread because I thought it would be interesting to see what people's favorite and least favorite things about 4e are. You only have to write one thing you like, and one thing you don't; but feel free to post as many "pros" and "cons" as you want.

I'm looking forward to hearing your replies.

***

Favorite thing about 4e: the power system: Daily, Encounter, and At-will.
Least Favorite thing about 4e: lack of some of the multitude of spells built up in 3e.

***update April 16th 2012***

Just thought I'd give you all a recap of what most people have been saying so far:

4e Cons sum up: Magic Items are too crazy, Rituals implementation, Feats too mechanical, too many effects stacking up in combat, too many interrupts, combats too formulaic, no out of combat flexibility, and too many number increases at higher levels which makes combat slower.

4e Pros sum up: Encounter Building, Monster Building, The Power System (most people like it, some favor Essentials) All PCs being equal and more balanced, tighter and more flexible system, clear page layout and formatting.

4e Splits (some people like, some don't): Essentials, Skill Challenges, The skill system in general, Healing System, and Status Effects.

Hope that helps you guys!

--David L. Dostaler
Author, Challenger RPG a Free Roleplaying Game
www.amazon.com/Challenger-Free-Roleplayi...

For me the best thing is that all classes are equally interesting.   Every prior version had a major class imbalance IMO.    In all honesty, I like almost everything about 4e; I feel it is by a huge margin the best version of the game yet, and I've been playing it since the mid 70's.

The thing I like the least in 4e is all the combat tracking; the ongoing, the until-the-end-of-your-next-turn stuff, etc.   I have no issues with something like wall of fire setting a patch of ground on fire, but I wish all the personal and direct effects occured and then were done with at the end of that players current turn.
favorite:  Balance.  I love the fact that everyone has something to do, there's none of the old "the fighters are here to carry the wizard's loot at high levels"

least favorite:  conditionals.  It seems like most things you can get are conditional.  Something has to be bloodied, or hit with an at will previous round, etc etc.  I don't want to have to remember to track all that crap.  I don't want items that do something neat once per day.  I want my bonuses to be /always on/ so I don't have to add up and keep track of different things every round.
Favorite: Extended adventure day - I like that the players have larger HP pools, healing surges, and encounter/at-will powers that allow them to fight a few battles in a day without feeling the need to rest for extended times (at lower level).

Hated: Skill challenges as presented - I love the concept, they were presented very poorly at first.  At this point I have completely redone how they work.  I actually hope they take the concept, tinker it and make it workable for DDN
 
Welcome to ZomboniLand - My D&D Blog http://zomboniland.blogspot.com/
Favorite: Ease of use on ALL levels. 4e is really a great edition to teach. My group and I play on our University Campus and we have people jump into play all the time. 4e(not essentials mind) is quick and simple to learn and makes play fun. I love the ease of DM set up. Whoops forgot to set the adventure up, hey look five minutes and I have an adventure ready to go.

Hated: Classes being to "restricted". I love the balance in 4e's classes, but I hate how straight jacketed they are! I want to play a striker Artificer darn it! Or a melee dex based ranger! Homebrew helps with this, but it doesn't settle my nagging need to make classes more "free".


Also Salla, good to see you back with the Slapp Squirrel avatar, though the pony was great as well. 
Favorite: Balance and power structure. All characters can be fun all the time.

Least Favorite: With feats and prerequisites it's harded to grow a good character organically instead of pre-planning the whole damned thing. That's a crappy practice that started in 3E and I wish would have died a horrible death of pain and turture.
Favorite:  Characters are FUN to play at first level and feel powerful.  I don't get to play much so I want a character that is fun to play on day one.  (And fun to play in organized play events that are low level.)

Least favorite:  In a quest for balance, all the classes feel too similar.   
Favourites:


  • Balance - Each class has a role and does it reasonably well and as well as any other in their role.

  • Power system - I love AEDU!

  • Healing Surges- It's awesome that ultimately PCs are responsible for their own healing and that leaders only aid in the healing but can do a multitude of other things.

  • 1/2 level maths - I like the way that as my character grows it on paper looks stronger. I know there's good reasons for others disliking this but I like it.

  • Item levels - I like that you know how much an item will be based on it's level. I'd like to see a mechanic to be able to craft an item by adding things to it to give it levels (eg flaming might be worth 1 level but regain a spent encounter power might be worth 5 or 7 levels at paragon or something)



Dislikes:


  • Essentials classes - They dumbed down the AEDU to a point of boredom for me

  • Essential feats - While most of my characters use them they did overpower PCs

  • Item rarity - It was a nice idea but implemented too late. Much like Essentials IMO

  • Too many strikers - There are 2:1 striker classes to controller classes.

  • Too many classes - The subclass system could have worked but again was implemented too late

  • Hearing that D&D Next is coming - Really? 4th ed is great!

  • The Cancelling of products to accomodate Essentials - Why did we only make it to Martial Power 2?


while my number of likes are fewer than dislikes, I can't think of a thing in older editions that I preferr over 4th making 4th the best edition thus far IMO.

 
Favorite? Game balance.

Least favorite? How 4e blatently feels like you are "puhing buttons" and how often it reminds you that you are playing a game.

I also dislike how 4e is set up to be high fantasy and when people talk about, write about ,adn try to make it low or mid-range fantasy [no magic items, or at least no +1 magic sword kindof magic items] it really breaks the game, and you need to heavily modify the rules to make that work.

I prefer the low-to-mid level fantsy like Dragon Age: Origins, or how many D&D campaigns start before you advance too far.
Favourite? The action economy. While it isn't new, the implementation worked well and is easier to track than for example percentage-based systems.

Least favourite? Broken rulebooks which required 135 pages of errata, forcing us to pay to access the Compendium. If you can't ship a quality printed product, you must offer updated PDF versions or free Compendium access. I will never buy a WotC product again until this is addressed.

Other drawbacks that come to mind are:
- the plethora of different durations and small modifiers that are hopeless to track; if it isn't BIG, then it shouldn't be conditional,
- stupid implementation of magical ammunition,
- making magic items a requirement (leading players to expect/demand them) instead of wondrous items or story-linked items,
- tedious book-keeping of magic item uses,
- the way player damage becomes increasingly average as they level up; 1D12 is flat distribution, 1/12 to max damage; 3D12 is bell curve, 1/1728 to max damage; 10D12 is a ridiculously steep bell curve that just makes us count to 65 over and over and makes max damage achievable only with a critical hit
- too many feats and no way to mark them as useless rubbish that I never want to see again in the Character Builder.
- online Character Builder; the offline version was ok, the online version is incredibly unreliable (blank screen on start, crashes, etc) and charging for access to it is ridiculous,


I also dislike how 4e is set up to be high fantasy and when people talk about, write about ,adn try to make it low or mid-range fantasy [no magic items, or at least no +1 magic sword kindof magic items] it really breaks the game, and you need to heavily modify the rules to make that work.



Inherent Bonuses aren't a particularly heavy houserule (and they aren't even a houserule anymore, since they have official support).
Another day, another three or four entries to my Ignore List.
- the way player damage becomes increasingly average as they level up; 1D12 is flat distribution, 1/12 to max damage; 3D12 is bell curve, 1/1728 to max damage; 10D12 is a ridiculously steep bell curve that just makes us count to 65 over and over and makes max damage achievable only with a critical hit



Curious: have you tried (or would your group be interested in trying) multiplying up the x[W] instead of rolling a fistful of dice? For example, rolling a 7[W] power means rolling your [W] die (still using two six siders for a 2d6 weapon) and multiplying by 7 before adding the static mods. This would keep hits wildly swinging at the later levels, though not totally (as the statics grow significantly). Crits still have their bonus dice to keep them above a max roll. I dunno if you really want a 10d12 attack to swing 100 pts in damage in practice at the table, but it kinda sounds like you do. (And really is it that much different than a level 1 at-will swinging 10 points against a level 1 monster?)

Seems like a perfectly reasonable house rule for a group that prefers the swinginess. 


Inherent Bonuses aren't a particularly heavy houserule (and they aren't even a houserule anymore, since they have official support).



Plase, tell me more. I am a 4e beginner. The more resources the better. Thanks!