Deck cutting rules

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Hello, I would like to know if there are any guidelines or restrictions in how you or an opponent may cut each other's deck in a tournament? Could you please give different examples of what would be correct and or what would be incorrect. I seen someone completely reshuffle an opponents deck instead of just a cut. Is this considered fair or sportsman like?

Thank you in advance!
Shuffling your opponent's deck is permitted at regular REL (like FNM) and required at competitive and professional REL. It's far from unsportsmanlike.

From the magic tournament rules:


3.9 Card Shuffling
Decks must be randomized at the start of every game and whenever an instruction requires it. Randomization is defined as bringing the deck to a state where no player can have any information regarding the order or position of cards in any portion of the deck. Pile shuffling alone is not sufficiently random.

Once the deck is randomized, it must be presented to an opponent. By this action, players state that their decks are legal and randomized. The opponent may then shuffle it additionally. Cards and sleeves must not be in danger of being damaged during this process. If the opponent does not believe the player made a reasonable effort to randomize his or her deck, the opponent must notify a judge. Players may request to have a judge shuffle their cards rather than the opponent; this request will be honored only at a judge’s discretion.

If a player has had the opportunity to see any of the card faces of the deck being shuffled, the deck is no longer considered randomized and must be randomized again.

At Competitive and Professional REL tournaments, players are required to shuffle their opponents’ decks after their owners have shuffled them. The Head Judge can require this at Regular REL tournaments as well.

All Generalizations are Bad
I seen someone completely reshuffle an opponents deck instead of just a cut. Is this considered fair or sportsman like?

That's quite fair. That's what your opponent should do. The procedure for shuffling decks is: You shuffle your deck until you feel it is sufficiently randomized, then you present it to your opponent. Your opponent may now shuffle the deck too (at high level tournaments, this step is mandatory). Once you're opponent is done shuffling, the process is complete.

The tournament rules no longer give a definition of a cut, because they no longer call for cuts to be performed. Back when the tournament rules did include cuts, it was defined something like "taking one section of the deck and placing it on top".
Hello, I would like to know if there are any guidelines or restrictions in how you or an opponent may cut each other's deck in a tournament? Could you please give different examples of what would be correct and or what would be incorrect. I seen someone completely reshuffle an opponents deck instead of just a cut. Is this considered fair or sportsman like?

Thank you in advance!



Your opponent is allowed to shuffle your deck.  In tournaments, it's even required that they do.

From the Comp. Rules:

103.1. At the start of a game, each player shuffles his or her deck so that the cards are in a random
order. Each player may then shuffle or cut his or her opponents‘ decks. The players‘ decks become
their libraries.



From the Magic Tournament Rules:
3.9 Card Shuffling
Decks must be randomized at the start of every game and whenever an instruction requires it. Randomization is defined as bringing the deck to a state where no player can have any information regarding the order or position of cards in any portion of the deck. Pile shuffling alone is not sufficiently random.
Once the deck is randomized, it must be presented to an opponent. By this action, players state that their decks are legal and randomized. The opponent may then shuffle it additionally. Cards and sleeves must not be in danger of being damaged during this process. If the opponent does not believe the player made a reasonable effort to randomize his or her deck, the opponent must notify a judge. Players may request to have a judge shuffle their cards rather than the opponent; this request will be honored only at a judge’s discretion.
If a player has had the opportunity to see any of the card faces of the deck being shuffled, the deck is no longer considered randomized and must be randomized again.
At Competitive and Professional REL tournaments, players are required to shuffle their opponents’ decks after their owners have shuffled them. The Head Judge can require this at Regular REL tournaments as well.

I seen someone completely reshuffle an opponents deck instead of just a cut. Is this considered fair or sportsman like?

Not only is it fair, it's sometimes mandatory. The procedure for shuffling decks is: You shuffle your deck until you feel it is sufficiently randomized, then you present it to your opponent. Your opponent may now shuffle the deck too (at high level tournaments, this step is mandatory). Once you're opponent is done shuffling, the process is complete.

The tournament rules no longer give a definition of a cut, because they no longer call for cuts to be performed. Back when the tournament rules did include cuts, it was defined something like "taking one section of the deck and placing it on top". 



Interesting.  Should "cut" also be removed from the Comp Rules, then?  Or if not removed, should it be defined?
 
Thank you all for the clarification!
What should you do when you catch your opponent taking a peek at the bottom of the cards while they're shuffling your deck?   Or what about when someone does the shuffle that bends the cards,  I can't stand that.... 

This irks me at FNM, cause it's easy to get away with it (most wouldn't call a judge to make a big stink out of it)  
If an opponent is peeking at the bottom card of your deck while they are shuffling, that is cheating.

If you suspect your opponent is cheating, you should call a judge or the tournament organiser, which is usually the store owner at an FNM. That is really all you can do.
You can also ask a judge to shuffle your deck instead of an opponent.