overlooting players?

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Got a question.

Are my players overlooting?
Whenever they finish an encounter they immediatly start to loot every and I mean every monster in the room.
And the always take every scrap of equipment and items the monsters have.
Hell, during kobold hall the cleric took the wyrmpriest his skullmask and wore it himself(had to allow it: DM GUIDE SAYS TO NEVER SAY NO).
I'm afraid that by doing this my players are getting to much money for their lvl's.
But I'm afraid to say no caus the DM guide says to never say no and my players might rebel saying that it's standard RPG logic to loot.      

So are my players overlooting(looting to much) or is this normal behaviour?
And what should I do? Say no and go against the DM guide? Allow it?
Help!     
"Into the heart of battle, I shall walk In the eye of the storm, I will stand Onto the end of the earth, I shall hunt In defence of others, I shall fight For honour and glory, I will live And for justice, I would die"
Ask them, "How do you intend to carry all this stuff?"
Ask them, "How do you intend to carry all this stuff?"



"facepalms"
Didn't think of that yet.

Although knowing my players they'll start to qoute PH page 222 saying:

"The amount you carry should rarely be an issue, and you don’t need to calculate the weight your character is hauling around unless it’s likely to matter."

But what if they manage to get a bag of holding? Sure I could deny them it forever but thats not fun and fun is the most important thing according to DM guide. What should i doe then? 

"Into the heart of battle, I shall walk In the eye of the storm, I will stand Onto the end of the earth, I shall hunt In defence of others, I shall fight For honour and glory, I will live And for justice, I would die"
To be fair, that's kinda the whole damn point of a bag of holding.

The merchant they unload loot on merely has to say something like "Another three-dozen shortswords?  I can't even sell the last hundred or so you guys dumped on me!"
(had to allow it: DM GUIDE SAYS TO NEVER SAY NO).



The DM guide does not say 'never say no'.  It says 'say yes whenever possible'.

So, let them loot to their heart's content.  They aren't going to be able to sell any of it, because it's cheap, used and damaged.  All they're really doing is wasting their storage space.

Make sure you tell them that they're just wasting their time and storage space.  They should stop.
Another day, another three or four entries to my Ignore List.
Most monsters carry just junk with them, or common weapons and armor.  And "Common" items sell at 20% of their retail value.

It's normal for players to want to loot, but them taking EVERYTHING could be a sign that they feel a little starved for treasure.  Or it could be a sign that they're greedy bastards.

Are you using the Treasure Parcel packages from the DM Guide?

If they want to take everything, that's fine, but remind them about the weight of carrying everything.  Or encourage them to hire a pack mule or something similar.  There's really nothing wrong with your players being "hoarders".  But give them fun ways to do it, henchman, donkeys, a merchant that follows them, or some such.
Most monsters carry just junk with them, or common weapons and armor.  And "Common" items sell at 20% of their retail value.

It's normal for players to want to loot, but them taking EVERYTHING could be a sign that they feel a little starved for treasure.  Or it could be a sign that they're greedy bastards.

Are you using the Treasure Parcel packages from the DM Guide?

If they want to take everything, that's fine, but remind them about the weight of carrying everything.  Or encourage them to hire a pack mule or something similar.  There's really nothing wrong with your players being "hoarders".  But give them fun ways to do it, henchman, donkeys, a merchant that follows them, or some such.



Just used kobold hall and followed whatever treasure it said.
but as one of my players just said: basic rule of rpg's: loot everything 
"Into the heart of battle, I shall walk In the eye of the storm, I will stand Onto the end of the earth, I shall hunt In defence of others, I shall fight For honour and glory, I will live And for justice, I would die"
Sure, they can take whatever they want since there is no moral consquences to it, but at the same time make it clear that it's more effort then it's worth.

Swords could fetch a few silver *mainly to melt down*, gold and potions are always worth something, if you have someone with knowledge nature or whatever the equilient is have them be able to extract some peieces of the deceased. But impliment carrying rules (carrying 20 swords? Alright, you are now treated as fighting in heavy armour, and as your not trained in that you get all the penatlies for none of the benfits) and make certain items (such as rusty hemits, clothing e.c.t) practically useless.

Nothing wrong with looting, as many items have some kind of worth, but make it clear that not every item will be useful and hence they should priortise their plunder. Also impliment some quests with relative time limits that pausing to loot for any period of time will create further difficulty or chance of failure. Like if they take too long the guy who orignally setup the quest, assumed you died and setup another group of adventurers and refuses to pay them their full reward when they do get back several days later then expected as he will likely have to pay the other guys for wasting their time.
Sure, they can take whatever they want since there is no moral consquences to it, but at the same time make it clear that it's more effort then it's worth.

Swords could fetch a few silver *mainly to melt down*, gold and potions are always worth something, if you have someone with knowledge nature or whatever the equilient is have them be able to extract some peieces of the deceased. But impliment carrying rules (carrying 20 swords? Alright, you are now treated as fighting in heavy armour, and as your not trained in that you get all the penatlies for none of the benfits) and make certain items (such as rusty hemits, clothing e.c.t) practically useless.

Nothing wrong with looting, as many items have some kind of worth, but make it clear that not every item will be useful and hence they should priortise their plunder. Also impliment some quests with relative time limits that pausing to loot for any period of time will create further difficulty or chance of failure. Like if they take too long the guy who orignally setup the quest, assumed you died and setup another group of adventurers and refuses to pay them their full reward when they do get back several days later then expected as he will likely have to pay the other guys for wasting their time.



This seems like punishing players for being players...

There's rules already for weapon weight.  If somebody is carrying 20 longswords that's only 80 pounds of swords.  Which would be a lot for a wizard to carry, but not a fighter whose prime state is strength, and could easily be 18-20 at level 1, meaning they can carry 180 to 200 lbs at their normal carrying weight.

The rules are already in place for carrying heavy loads and max loads.  No reason to punish players just because they like to hoard swords.  Besides, if you're running a Dark Sun game or anything with the reckless breakage rule, you might have a reason to carry around a bunch of spare weapons.

I'm sure after a while your players will decide that when they're only getting 3gp a pop for each of those 20 longswords that it's just more trouble than it's worth. 

Now back to the Op, beelzeboss , I've found the loot in the Wizards campaigns is quite skewed.  They hand out magical items like candy.  It really got to me when I was running some of the Dark Sun stuff from Dungeon Magazine issues.  In Dark Sun, as a general rule magic items are supposed to be scarce, but most of the WotC Dungeon / Dark Sun campaigns were flushed with magic items at the rate of 1 / every other encounter.  So, I abandoned using their tables, I still use loot, but I find that the DM guide has a better rate of giving out items per level of play.

I'm guessing their new at the game, because generally (in my experience) veteran players don't bother with looting junk.  Unless they're penny pinching to buy something.  Your players will probably grow out of it, give them distractions from the "everything's dead, loot time" mood.  You could always throw the next encounter at them right away.

In keeping with the spirit of Wystenv2's post, if they are slowing the game down with looting, then show them that the "game" doesn't slow down for them.  "As you begin sifting through the bodies, the kobolds from the next chamber suddenly show up to investigate what all that commotion was about."
Thats why I liked second ed wgt/bulk system, yeah you can carry 100 long swords by wgt alone if str is high enough, but HTF do you carry 100 long swords. A fighter can carry 2-3 suits of field plate armor but how on earth could he carry all that and still beable to function at all? Cause as it says in book and was quoted here "The amount you carry should rarely be an issue, and you don’t need to calculate the weight your character is hauling around unless it’s likely to matter." In their minds they did this cause like everything else in 4th, it was meant to be simpler and faster to dive right into combat so assumed (wrongly) people wouldnt be retarded about it, Which means YOU as the dm decides when to draw the line, is it 100 longswords?, 20 suits of armors?, a whole dead dragons corpse?, a warship?, a whole castle they somehow manage to fit on their back?

Seems like they have standard video game mentality over role playing one. Such as wearing field plate in desert, video gamers simpley ignore it cause simple endure element spells or cause their fort save is so high they can resist the effects while role players take it off cause it would still be miserably hot and sand would get everywhere.

Giving them bags of holding only encourages it even more so and if they have a wgt limit (Not sure in 4th) you fully know they will ignore it.
Sounds like part new player, part system.

Easy solution is to stop it at its source: buying magic items. If you stop selling magic items through vendors, the desire for gold will pretty much go away on its own. They simply won't need it (or much of it) to interact with the game world.

Just make sure your adventures hinge on something more important than just a good day's pay.

No amount of tips, tricks, or gimmicks will ever be better than simply talking directly to your fellow players to resolve your issues.
DMs: Don't Prep the Plot | Structure First, Story Last | Prep Tips | Spoilers Don't Spoil Anything | No Myth Roleplaying
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Sounds like part new player, part system.

Easy solution is to stop it at its source: buying magic items. If you stop selling magic items through vendors, the desire for gold will pretty much go away on its own. They simply won't need it (or much of it) to interact with the game world.

Just make sure your adventures hinge on something more important than just a good day's pay.



funny thing: magic items and stores where never mentioned. just as soon as the battle was over they where all like: loot all the things.
one of my players said this: basic rpg rule: always loot everything.
But that same player said later that they really wanted a base(they're only lvl 1).

But one of my players did find it weird that everything in the PH was buyable in stores. 
"Into the heart of battle, I shall walk In the eye of the storm, I will stand Onto the end of the earth, I shall hunt In defence of others, I shall fight For honour and glory, I will live And for justice, I would die"
At level 1 even standard equipment is worth noticeable money. This will cease to be the case very soon.

As a suggestion I would offer the following:

'Allright, the monsters are now disposed of, and you scavenge the area carefully for everything of value. The bunch of stuff weighs in at 123 lbs and requires 4 sacks which you have. The whole thing is worth 10 gp at the store where you can sell it when you get there. Now getting on with our regularly scheduled gaming.. '

Squeezes the looting into only a few sentences. The players are happy that their hard work gets rewarded, and it doesn't bog down the adventuring too much. Next encounter you can remind them that 'In the last room you filled 4 sacks with loot, you can't carry more than 2 sacks from this room. The additional loot is worth an additional 5 gp. You are now at your carrying capacity. Buying a mule costs 15gp.' Or something to that effect.
you Shouldn't/Can't/Don't sell mundane gear.

problem solved.

Try any or all of these explanations: 

Merchants just DON'T buy that stuff:
what merchant in his right mind would buy USED, and likely DAMAGED goods from a (for lack of a better term) unknown source.  The merchants can trust the town blacksmith.  If his goods are crap, they know where to find him later to either break some kneecaps or have a reasonable discussion about merchandise quality.  Adventurers seem as likely to be grifters as heroes, and even when the adventurers ARE honest, they can make mistakes, and the merchants are likely as not never going to see them again. 

Sorry, you CAN'T sell that, they just don't want it:
The merchants just don't want that junk.  These merchants are interested in quality merchandise, and there just isn't much profit to be made stocking their cart/store full of secondhand swords that may take months or more to sell for a grand profit of 2 copper each.  When the majority of the town is humans who probably wield no more than daggers, staves or clubs, and the town guard is already outfitted in matching, nice, quality gear, how the F--- is that merchant gonna unload 12 suits of small size leather armor that smells like lizard?  Sorry, no deal.

If you wanna be heroes to the town, you really SHOULDN'T sell that crap:
You're heroes guys!  Do you really wanna try to pass off to a merchant that shoddy crooked goblin sword, or that small size leather armor with 2 scorch marks, 3 arrow holes, and a giant slice across the chest?  Do you think the merchants would look kindly on gambling on your merchandise?  do you think the smiths and tanners would look kindly on you trying to steal their business?


EDIT:
make sure they're getting the equipment that they should if you're denying them selling that stuff though.  By level 2, they should have gotten roughly 720g, a level 2, level 3, level 4, and level 5 magic item.  Also, try to avoid waiting until the last fight of the level to give them everything.  If i'm playing in a game and looking for nifty stuff with my level 1 character, its annoying to suddenly recieve all of the loot after the last encounter of the level, right when i'm about to tae an extended rest to hit level 2.  Give them some good loot up front and they'll be more likely to ignore the mundane.   
you Shouldn't/Can't/Don't sell mundane gear.

problem solved.

Try any or all of these explanations: 

Merchants just DON'T buy that stuff:
what merchant in his right mind would buy USED, and likely DAMAGED goods from a (for lack of a better term) unknown source.  The merchants can trust the town blacksmith.  If his goods are crap, they know where to find him later to either break some kneecaps or have a reasonable discussion about merchandise quality.  Adventurers seem as likely to be grifters as heroes, and even when the adventurers ARE honest, they can make mistakes, and the merchants are likely as not never going to see them again. 

Sorry, you CAN'T sell that, they just don't want it:
The merchants just don't want that junk.  These merchants are interested in quality merchandise, and there just isn't much profit to be made stocking their cart/store full of secondhand swords that may take months or more to sell for a grand profit of 2 copper each.  When the majority of the town is humans who probably wield no more than daggers, staves or clubs, and the town guard is already outfitted in matching, nice, quality gear, how the F--- is that merchant gonna unload 12 suits of small size leather armor that smells like lizard?  Sorry, no deal.

If you wanna be heroes to the town, you really SHOULDN'T sell that crap:
You're heroes guys!  Do you really wanna try to pass off to a merchant that shoddy crooked goblin sword, or that small size leather armor with 2 scorch marks, 3 arrow holes, and a giant slice across the chest?  Do you think the merchants would look kindly on gambling on your merchandise?  do you think the smiths and tanners would look kindly on you trying to steal their business?


EDIT:
make sure they're getting the equipment that they should if you're denying them selling that stuff though.  By level 2, they should have gotten roughly 720g, a level 2, level 3, level 4, and level 5 magic item.  Also, try to avoid waiting until the last fight of the level to give them everything.  If i'm playing in a game and looking for nifty stuff with my level 1 character, its annoying to suddenly recieve all of the loot after the last encounter of the level, right when i'm about to tae an extended rest to hit level 2.  Give them some good loot up front and they'll be more likely to ignore the mundane.   




I'll try those next time, that same player i keep talking about doesn't riot/complain as quick about a no/rule zero/denial when the DM gives a (in his eyes) good enough reason. now lets hope one of these reasons is enough to satisfy him
yeah, like i said: i was running kobold hall as our first adventure and i was just following the loot described there.
but thx for the mentioning of the 720gp. 
"Into the heart of battle, I shall walk In the eye of the storm, I will stand Onto the end of the earth, I shall hunt In defence of others, I shall fight For honour and glory, I will live And for justice, I would die"
EDIT:
make sure they're getting the equipment that they should if you're denying them selling that stuff though.  By level 2, they should have gotten roughly 720g, a level 2, level 3, level 4, and level 5 magic item.  Also, try to avoid waiting until the last fight of the level to give them everything.  If i'm playing in a game and looking for nifty stuff with my level 1 character, its annoying to suddenly recieve all of the loot after the last encounter of the level, right when i'm about to tae an extended rest to hit level 2.  Give them some good loot up front and they'll be more likely to ignore the mundane.   



+1. Extra street cred if you seed items in the first encounter that are both useful to the character(s) and particularly useful in some way in the final encounter of that adventure.

As for the player that wants a "base," just tell him he can have one and ask him to describe it, including how he managed to acquire it. Ask questions to pin him down to specifics and dig for ideas you might use later or that reveal something about his character that is interesting. The PCs are likely rich enough to buy a reasonable pad and some furniture at the end of their first adventure. Tell him he can have it "for free." Here's the thing about PC "bases": They usually don't have a whole lot of adventuring going on around them, so they aren't terribly important in the grand scheme of things. You can just let them have one. Once he realizes it doesn't cost him anything, that should tone down the looting as well.

No amount of tips, tricks, or gimmicks will ever be better than simply talking directly to your fellow players to resolve your issues.
DMs: Don't Prep the Plot | Structure First, Story Last | Prep Tips | Spoilers Don't Spoil Anything | No Myth Roleplaying
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I would not worry about it.

There are many ways to 'take money away' from characters (assuming it is even an issue)

High taxes, thieves, bribes, overpriced goods and services, so many ways to spend gold.



My advice is to let them loot all they want, pay a little attention to how they carry everything, but don't bust their chops over looting.

Then if they do become 'too wealthy'  (Not sure that is a problem) find ways to make they spend gold. Preferable in ways they enjoy spending it.
One way to deal with this is simply "you find X gold worth of stuff" and just keep it abstract. Unless there's actually something interesting to find (actual loot, plot items or just fun stuff like the mask). Makes record keeping simple. Otherwise you get into what is called Dungeons and Bookkeeping and most don't find that fun.

The basic rule of "loot everything" sounds like he's coming from a video game background and he may need a reminder that this isn't WoW or Skyrim. It can be a bit of a paradigm shift.
there is a treasure table-by-level page (or 4 pages) in the original 4e DMG (pretty sure its not in the essentials material).  It details what the players should get each level, but can be easily broken down to this:

for each level, the FIVE-person party should get (roughly):
Level+1 magic item
Level+2 magic item
Level+3 magic item
Level+4 magic item
Money equal to 2 magic items of their level

I don't believe that this table has really been updated (if it has, someone please correct me) so it dates back to 4e release, but it DOES provide a useful guideline, especially at low levels before item bloat starts to rear its head.  in the 5 levels before they "move on" to a new enhancement bonus, the party will get 20 items, and assuming you're covering all the "math" slots each time, thats 5 weapons, 5, armors, 5 neck items, and 5 "other".....plus plenty of gold to buy more "others."  Old +X items and those "other" items start to add up at higher levels if you actually play through all the levels.


also, +1 on the base idea.  Bases can add both perks and responsibilities to an adventuring group.  It might provide them free ammo/food/water or even transportation (a horse for each!).  Maybe it gives them a steady supply of jobs.  Maybe they've even got underlings that see to the "less consequential tasks" (ie. clearing the rats out of the cellar).  The underlings can provide levelled gold (which may just happen to be EXACTLY the remaining amount that they should get for a given level *wink*) periodically as they complete quests.....all this will make the PCs attached to the base, it will make them feel heroic and "in-charge." and will work wonderfully when you want to have troglodytes suddenly burrow up into their base's basement under the employment of a rival adventuring group/guild!  
Are my players overlooting?

Yes, but there's not really an issue with it.

Hell, during kobold hall the cleric took the wyrmpriest his skullmask and wore it himself(had to allow it: DM GUIDE SAYS TO NEVER SAY NO).

That's not what it says. It says to try to use "Yes, and..." instead of "No" to reward players instead of shutting them down.

Why wouldn't you allow the cleric to wear the mask of the wyrmpriest? There are lots of interesting places that could go. Maybe kobolds attack him preferentially for desecrating their sacred item, or maybe they avoid him out of fear and respect for the mask. Maybe they hated the wyrmpriest and revere the person who defeated him (which they believe is the reason the cleric wears the mask.)

I'm afraid that by doing this my players are getting to much money for their lvl's.
But I'm afraid to say no caus the DM guide says to never say no

That's not what the DMG says.

and my players might rebel saying that it's standard RPG logic to loot.

I'm not sure where it's written, but mundane items do not have resale value. Most if not all items that monsters use are mundane items. The wyrmpriest's staff is just a stick.

And what should I do? Say no and go against the DM guide? Allow it?

This is not a case of saying no. You do allow them to loot, if that's what they want. You do allow them to sell the items, if that's what they want. You are not obligated to give them any money for what they've collected, unless the items are magical. Describe it however you like, but basically there's no way for them to turn any kind of profit for mundane items. They're not merchants, they're adventurers. One way to describe it would be to handwave their incidental expenses in town, and allow them to acquire the mundane items they need in exchange for the ones they don't. Pretty soon, all mundane items will cost less that it's worth to track, compared to the wealth the can pull down from adventuring for a little while. This is why characters created at higher levels can have any mundane equipment they want.

If I have to ask the GM for it, then I don't want it.

Are my players overlooting?

Yes, but there's not really an issue with it.

Hell, during kobold hall the cleric took the wyrmpriest his skullmask and wore it himself(had to allow it: DM GUIDE SAYS TO NEVER SAY NO).

That's not what it says. It says to try to use "Yes, and..." instead of "No" to reward players instead of shutting them down.

Why wouldn't you allow the cleric to wear the mask of the wyrmpriest? There are lots of interesting places that could go. Maybe kobolds attack him preferentially for desecrating their sacred item, or maybe they avoid him out of fear and respect for the mask. Maybe they hated the wyrmpriest and revere the person who defeated him (which they believe is the reason the cleric wears the mask.)

I'm afraid that by doing this my players are getting to much money for their lvl's.
But I'm afraid to say no caus the DM guide says to never say no

That's not what the DMG says.

and my players might rebel saying that it's standard RPG logic to loot.

I'm not sure where it's written, but mundane items do not have resale value. Most if not all items that monsters use are mundane items. The wyrmpriest's staff is just a stick.

And what should I do? Say no and go against the DM guide? Allow it?

This is not a case of saying no. You do allow them to loot, if that's what they want. You do allow them to sell the items, if that's what they want. You are not obligated to give them any money for what they've collected, unless the items are magical. Describe it however you like, but basically there's no way for them to turn any kind of profit for mundane items. They're not merchants, they're adventurers. One way to describe it would be to handwave their incidental expenses in town, and allow them to acquire the mundane items they need in exchange for the ones they don't. Pretty soon, all mundane items will cost less that it's worth to track, compared to the wealth the can pull down from adventuring for a little while. This is why characters created at higher levels can have any mundane equipment they want.



I know it says to always say yes but I read it as t never say no: always saying yes to me is the same as always saying no.
And I never said there was a problem with the cleric putting it on. And it was after the encounter before the dragon of kobold hall so there were no kobolds to attack him. 
"Into the heart of battle, I shall walk In the eye of the storm, I will stand Onto the end of the earth, I shall hunt In defence of others, I shall fight For honour and glory, I will live And for justice, I would die"
I know it says to always say yes but I read it as t never say no: always saying yes to me is the same as always saying no.

It doesn't say to "always" say "yes." It advises you to take the position of "Yes, and..." instead of defaulting to "No." "No" is a block and it shuts down creativity. "Yes" by itself is better, but if you don't do anything with it, the players feel like their choices don't matter. "Yes, and..." is the ideal, because you're rewarding the creativity with some kind of consequence. Ideally the consequence is interesting, and not just "what would logically happen," or worse actually a punishment.

And I never said there was a problem with the cleric putting it on. And it was after the encounter before the dragon of kobold hall so there were no kobolds to attack him.

You're missing the point. Those were just examples of the kinds of interesting things that can result from a player choice like that. But even the dragon can have some kind of reaction to the PC's decision to wear the mask. Or people back in town could react to it. Or another wyrmpriest learns of the mask and wants to claim it. These are just examples. Pick something that works for your campaign.

Or, just ignore it. "Yes, and..." is the ideal, but no one can make every player choice matter. But if you default to "Yes" as much as possible, you provide yourself with more opportunities for an interesting "And."

If I have to ask the GM for it, then I don't want it.

The reason for the "always say yes" philosophy is that it rewards players for being creative. I think collecting junk is a nice way to do this. Players might want to do something with it (maybe just humiliate the opponents by taking their stuff away from them after death?), or try to sell it (although I doubt there is a market for used kobold gear).
Point is, this is one f the things this rule exists for. Say yes, but make sure there are consequences for being stupid. They won;t get rich by this, and if they pick up too much they will get weighed down. No problem, other than that it's their own choice.

Note that the PHB tells you that under normal circumstances weight won't be an issue. Players picking up every single item they see does not count towards normal circumstances. Even games like Skyrim and WoW have maximum carrying capacity, and for a reason. If they insist on picking up everything they see make sure there are consequences.

Lastly: maybe it could be nice to actually reward them for their trouble. If they carry around a bunch of kobold weaponry, maybe they could run into a bunch of unarmed gnomes that really need some weapons to defend themselves with. Try to get them thinking outside the box. Reward them for it once, then they will probably focus on something else from there.
I have a deal with my players regarding mundane loot. I ask them not to track mundane, pointless loot like nonmagical weapons and armor, and in return I do not track their rations, nonmagical ammunitions and trivial expenses like tavern lodging. Works well for us.
Another way to go at it might be to ask them what sort of campaign they want to play.  You've got a module, so the fights and even the plot of that part of the game are mapped out to some extent (if you decide to stick to the published material, that is,) but the scope of the campaign is still in their hands.

Ask them if they want the campaign to be street level, and the heroes to be regular joes who swing their swords to get by, or if they want the campaign to be heroic, with their characters cast in the part of traveling badass heroes, a breed apart from the people around them. 

See, the guy who comes into town caked in blood selling salvaged weapons and armor isn't a hero; he's a mercenary and a scavenger.  Some people really get into that kind of game - being on a first name basis with the smith because they supply him with iron, dealing with the local criminal element when they need something exotic, and being chucked in a cell to sober up after spending themselves back into poverty drinking away the memory of the horrible creatures they just barely defeated.  Tell them those are the kinds of characters who loot everything in this game, and ask them if that sounds like fun.  If they like the sound of it, give it to them.  That's what "say 'yes, and" means.  If they want to spend some time being the local tough guys the blacksmith calls on to solve his problems, say yes.

If they want to play a game of heroic fantasy, where they're some sort of celebrities who are talked about in hushed voices by the commons and called upon to Save the World, that's a different kind of game, and one you can give them if they'll stop pawning salvage and start dealing with the threat to the realm.  Tell them yes, the local blacksmith will pay them good silver for bringing in the kobolds' weapons, or the local lord will pay them good gold for bringing in the head of their leader.  Which sort of person do they want to deal with?  If it's the lord with his gold, they need to think bigger than salvage.  The lord won't buy a bloody head from the blacksmith's salvage team, but he'll handsomely reward the salvation of his people by the heroes of the realm.

If they want the hero package, be as good as your word - the lord rewards them, and the commons revere them.  They don't need the blacksmith's silver to pay the inkeeper because they're staying in the lord's keep and dazzling his sons with the tale of how they beat the module.  They'll be leaving town with a (modest) purse of gold and a reputation for badassery, and the next time someone needs a really heroic problem solved, they'll be called on.
"When Friday comes, we'll all call rats fish." D&D Outsider

Don't view them wanting to do this as a burden on you, and like other people have said - the idea behind saying "yes... and" is to encourage creativity, and it does tend to create unusual and interesting situations very often...

For instance, I had one player who really liked to collect trophies, for instance - he cut off a frost giant's beard to use as a belt, and took white dragon heads as trophies, he had a bag of holding specifically for his trophies... I generally let him do so with no problems (nature roll to skin the animal or some such - but really no big problems) however, this did lead to interesting situations... for instance, when he collected the white dragon heads, it was from 2 young white dragons they faced at the beginning of a cave. When they reached then end, they found an elder white dragon and the party attempted to negotiate with it, which was going fine until he dumped out his trophy bag in an attempt to impress the dragon, and it saw the dragon heads... it immediately enraged and attacked, and targeted primarily that player the entire time... even going out of it's way to hit him instead of others...

In another situation, he was able to use a trophy he collected to intimidate someone into doing what he wanted, or to impres a tribal leader with his battle prowess...

So no, collecting trophies is not really handled in the rules, and using a bag of holding like that probably wouldn't work, but the end result in this case was that it turned a normal dragon encounter into something with more flavor and interest to the characters....

Look for opportunities like this to use their choices either for or against them (like the above idea of them being able to arm some people with the weapons they gathered)

There are also other ways to go with this, perhaps the local blacksmith doesn't like these heroes coming into town trying to sell off tons of weapons and undermining his business, and sends thugs to deal with it, perhaps he offers to buy the weapons from the heroes at a wholesale rate (allowing you to make it easier to loot as well - just kind of sum up mundane things like stated above; ex. you find 20 swords, 10 suits of armor and 8 shields, they are worth x)

Also - just because the baddies fought with it doesn't make it of the quality that would be sellable... perhaps the kobolds are outfitted with rusty, dented armor, or dull, rusted, bent swords. Bad things don't always have the best gear, so it may actually be worth nothing at all...

(btw - some players may say "if it's rusty or such, why did it do so much damage" this can be easily countered with "imagine how deadly that fight could have been if the kobolds had been well outfitted..." and can even lead to some interesting gameplay situations, perhaps a higher-up bad guy is outfitting the kobolds with better arms and armor and while the soldiers of the area used to be able to stop the hordes of kobolds when they outgeared them, they are now having trouble because of the parity in gear and the disparity in numbers - leading to them hiring the heroes to fix the problem somehow)

"Human beings are almost unique in their ability to learn from the experiences of others, and in their apparent disinclination to do so." -Douglas Adams
Another way to go at it might be to ask them what sort of campaign they want to play.

[...]

Ask them if they want the campaign to be street level, and the heroes to be regular joes who swing their swords to get by, or if they want the campaign to be heroic, with their characters cast in the part of traveling badass heroes, a breed apart from the people around them. 

[...]



Agree totally with this.  Of course they can move from one sort of mentality to the other as they advance in lvl, and to a certain extent this will happen naturally.  But whether lvl1 means "ordinary joe" or "lvl1 Hero; capital H" is totally up to the campaign setting and the story you all want to tell.  What items are/aren't considered valuable just another part of the overall setting/atmosphere of the game. 

My DM doesn't base carrying capacity on weight; he bases it off what you can realistically carry (barring BoH-type items).

Your carrying capacity might say you can carry 30 swords, but imagine trying to carry that in real life... not gonna happen.

About the interpretation of the DMG saying "never say no:" the DMG also says that everything in there is just a set of guidelines for how to run the game. There are no laws or rules saying what the DM has to do.
Each of my party members carry a bag of holding (knapsack size) as they like to loot everything (200lbs max weight).  Yesterday they searched the remains of two earth elementals Surprised.

Another found out the lore on Kruthiks and insisted the party burrow along their tunnels for two (in-game) hours as they believed there would be treasures down there.  They didn't think about the miles and miles of tunnels that this would lead to.  I let them find a few gems.
I add more saves and RP elements in if the group starts picking up everything, just making certain rolls harder. Not to an extent that it goes beyond nerfing the character, but stealth rolls are harder due to jingling sacks, athletic checks etc. If all they are after is the gold, just count a rough amount and give that instead, as you assume they will sell the trash as soon as they return to a town. 
If they start stealing racial or significant items and wearing them, change their diplomacy and roleplay more speech into later encounters, Kobolds may act different if the group are wearing their masks etc.

One thing ive started doing, as my friend is an insta looter, even during combat is just add in more adhoc traps and even make some of the trash loot detrimental to their cause. Perhaps picking up that vial of what was assumed a heal potion, leaks and turns out to be poison, will make them think twice about looting all the trash.

I have a guy who drinks everything, and i mean everything, no matter what the liquid, he will sample it, from water, to blood, to ooze, its a running joke that he will taste it, after a few being pretty bad for him, he now thinks twice about tasting it, but usually still does it anyway.

If looting is a major part of their experience, make it a better experience, or, play it down, and just allow them the cash value, if thats all they want.