Why am I getting such bad dice rolls and how can I improve my rolls?

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I have been going to a DnD  group now that meets about every month and plays for about 10 - 12 hours a gaming session.  I am getting the worst dice rolls it seems in the group, especially when it comes to rolling my d20.  I always seem to roll very low numbers on my attack rolls, rolling most of the time single digits and thus completely missing my target. This translates to my contribution to the group to not be very good and an inability to use my special moves due to poor dice rolls. 

I have been told by experienced players that I need to get a collection of dice and experiment rolling them to figure out which dice tend to roll high numbers and which set of dice tend to roll the low numbers.  I have played about 8 times now with the group and have yet to roll 1 single natural 20. The other players in the group seem to be rolling 5-6 natural 20's every gaming session !  Our DM has all the players around the same level and using the same builds, so on paper we are very evenly skilled, but when it comes to rolling the dice I seem the absolute worst in the group ! I always seem to roll my d20 low and it is rare to roll above a 9. 

Other players said I had really bad dice and to try their d20's and actually I do roll a lot better with their dice.  They come to the gaming session with bags of dice that is a mixture of many different sets of dice, I always come to the DnD sessions carrying in my hand the same single set I always roll with. I assumed all the dice were the same, but players tell me they shop around for dice till they find a set that tends to always roll high. They also carry lots of sets of dice instead of one just in case they seem to be rolling bad with one set they can switch to another set of dice and see what happens.

I tried rolling the dice different and shaking it more when I rolled, I even tried rolling it against a book or straight edge to give the dice more of a bounce, but still my d20 seems to always roll very low numbers.   It feels really discouraging because the other players seem to have no problems always rolling in the 16 - 20 range, and 5 out of 6 tries I always am getting single digit rolls. Our last gaming session that lasted about 10 hours. I rolled the whole night single digits, except for one 18 dice roll, a 14, and an 11. All others were single digits.


Any advice what am I doing wrong?
They're dice. It's just probability. There's nothing working against you, nothing that you're doing wrong. It's just bad luck, which can't really be fixed because luck isn't a real thing, so there's nothing to fix. It's true that many dice are not very well made such that they do tend to roll some numbers over other numbers, but I most often find claims of faulty dice to be exaggerated. If you're really worried about it, though, get yourself some precision dice.

Even with those, though, you will still run into streaks of bad luck. I remember the first session that I ever played with a group, I used them and never rolled above a 6 to attack. It had them thinking my character was useless until the second session when I rolled pretty averagely and wrecked everything with my massive damage.

Why, yes, as a matter of fact I am the Unfailing Arbiter of All That Is Good Design (Even More So Than The Actual Developers) TM Speaking of things that were badly designed, please check out this thread for my Minotaur fix. What have the critics said, you ask? "If any of my players ask to play a Minotaur, I'm definitely offering this as an alternative to the official version." - EmpactWB "If I ever feel like playing a Minotaur I'll know where to look!" - Undrave "WoTC if you are reading this - please take this guy's advice." - Ferol_Debtor_of_Torm "Really full of win. A minotaur that is actually attractive for more than just melee classes." - Cpt_Micha Also, check out my recent GENASI variant! If you've ever wished that your Fire Genasi could actually set stuff on fire, your Water Genasi could actually swim, or your Wind Genasi could at least glide, then look no further. Finally, check out my OPTIONS FOR EVERYONE article, an effort to give unique support to the races that WotC keeps forgetting about. Includes new racial feature options for the Changeling, Deva, Githzerai, Gnoll, Gnome, Goliath, Half-Orc, Kalashtar, Minotaur, Shadar-Kai, Thri-Kreen, Warforged and more!
Ya true it could be the way I am throwing it too with my hands that is goofing me up. One player throws her d20 with a little plastic rubber toy in her palm. The dice bounce against the rubber toy when she throws as well on the table to give them more of a nice bounce. She thinks it helps her so I might try that and see if that helps at all. She suggested that I should try throwing my dice with it and see if helps improve my dice rolls.
I assumed all the dice were the same, but players tell me they shop around for dice till they find a set that tends to always roll high.



Like CC says, you may want to invest in some precision dice.  Most dice not used by, say, casinos will have some imbalances and thus won't roll with precisely even chances of every result, though it shouldn't be a big enough swing to make significant differences.

As far as dice that 'tend to always roll high', that's either selective memory in action ... or the player is looking for weighted dice, which is cheating, which is a 'get out of here and never come back'-able offense at many game tables.
Another day, another three or four entries to my Ignore List.

 Like Salla said, the other players have cherry-picked their dice to get ones that have a tendency to roll high. Especially with older dice, or dice that originally came from other games, the manufacturing quality and type of plastic used can vary wildly. Different plastics can have much different properties as far as weight, tendency towards forming air bubbles or retaining impurities during casting and how well they bounce when they hit the table. If the dice are old and have been in use for years, they can be unevenly worn.

 Pick up some new dice - not just one set, but a couple of them, and find ones that you like.

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I am the Magic Man.

(Pay no attention to the man behind the curtain.)

 

I am the Lawnmower Man.

(I AM GOD HERE!)

 

I am the Skull God.

(Koo Koo Ka Choo)

 

There are reasons they call me Mad...

Ya true it could be the way I am throwing it too with my hands that is goofing me up.

No, it couldn't. There's no "right way" to throw dice. There's no method of throwing dice to "mess up" probability, and if there were, then using it would be cheating.

One player throws her d20 with a little plastic rubber toy in her palm. The dice bounce against the rubber toy when she throws as well on the table to give them more of a nice bounce. She thinks it helps her...

She is wrong. It's just one of those little rituals like knocking on wood or wearing a good luck charm like a rabbit's foot. It's not real. It might make you feel better, but that's about it.

Why, yes, as a matter of fact I am the Unfailing Arbiter of All That Is Good Design (Even More So Than The Actual Developers) TM Speaking of things that were badly designed, please check out this thread for my Minotaur fix. What have the critics said, you ask? "If any of my players ask to play a Minotaur, I'm definitely offering this as an alternative to the official version." - EmpactWB "If I ever feel like playing a Minotaur I'll know where to look!" - Undrave "WoTC if you are reading this - please take this guy's advice." - Ferol_Debtor_of_Torm "Really full of win. A minotaur that is actually attractive for more than just melee classes." - Cpt_Micha Also, check out my recent GENASI variant! If you've ever wished that your Fire Genasi could actually set stuff on fire, your Water Genasi could actually swim, or your Wind Genasi could at least glide, then look no further. Finally, check out my OPTIONS FOR EVERYONE article, an effort to give unique support to the races that WotC keeps forgetting about. Includes new racial feature options for the Changeling, Deva, Githzerai, Gnoll, Gnome, Goliath, Half-Orc, Kalashtar, Minotaur, Shadar-Kai, Thri-Kreen, Warforged and more!
I remember an old method of 'properly' rolling a d4, but simply making sure the die has a good spin will suffice for any of them.

I know the feeling of never critting - that's me too - and of hitting a streak of bad rolls, but chances are that your dice are fine.

Of course, you should still get more dice. What self respecting gamer doesn't like new dice?
At my very first 4E LFR game years ago, I was very excited because it was the first time in decades I would be playing D&D with any but my family and a few friends. I dug out my box of dice, selected a few out of them and went to the store to play.

For the life of me I could not roll higher than 9 all night; usually lower. But, I was playing a dagger rogue so was still hitting occasionally. About 3 hours in I grabbed my ancient d20 and looked at it in frustration ... only to realize it was a d20 from some old game and only read 0-9 twice.

*slaps forehead*

But, yeah, everything everyoen said above is true ... though we all have some dice superstitions anyhow.
If you're trying to find dice that roll high and low, you're doing it wrong.

These "experienced players" seem rather immature if they're trying to game the system like that, and to be honest they're cheating themselves out of the fun.  The randomness is part of the fun.  Why not just have a houserule that says "instead of rolling, I just take 20 on everything - initative, attack rolls, saving throws, etc"?  Or better yet, just have the DM say "You win.  You've killed the BBEG and saved everyone.  Now do you want to play my next adventure?  Okay, cool.  You meet up in a tavern, and you win again."

Risk is fun.  Failing is fun.  Trying to sneak up on a gaggle of orcs and having everyone else in the party succeed while you roll a 1 makes for a funny moment.  Melodramatically telling the BBEG to "taste cold steel" and right before rolling a 2 is hilarious.  Always rolling high is like going to a casino where you always win, except without all the money.

That said, I find "dice superstition" to be one of the more entertaining bits of D&D culture.  Humans are funny, superstitious creatures, and we just plain don't understand probability.  Look at the Monty Hall problem - even math professors can be really stupid when it comes to probability.  The entire casino industry is based on this principle.  And I'm no exception - once I was playing at the FLGS and actually walked away from the table to buy a pair of new d20s in frustration after my Avenger kept missing.

First off, sometimes we think our dice are "hot" or "cold" for no rational reason.  Sometimes, we remeber the misses more than the hits, or the hits more than the misses when our dice are rolling randomly.  Compounding this, sometimes we just have an unlucky or lucky streak - it happens from time to time even with the most random of dice.  And since we tend to assume we're going to hit with our attacks, it's easier to remember the unlucky streaks.  I joke that I "can't roll decent initiative" and "can't crit" but my brain knows it's just confirmation bias.

If you really really want to feel better, just buy a couple extra cheap d20s and swap them out whenever you start getting paranoid.

Or, what you can do is put the unlucky die on the sidewalk.  Then line up all your other dice facing the unlucky die.  Take out a hammer and smash the unlucky die as a lesson to all your other dice.  They'll start rolling well, lest they get the hammer as well.
DM advice: 1. Do a Session Zero. 2. Start With Action. 3. Always say "Yes" to player ideas. 4. Don't build railroads. 5. Make success, failure, and middling rolls interesting. Player advice: 1. Don't be a dick. 2. Build off each other, don't block each other. 3. You're supposed to be a badass. Act like it. Take risks. My poorly updated blog: http://engineeredfun.wordpress.com/
Dice are just funny sometimes. I can go months without rolling a natural 20 on an attack, but I can sure crit those skill checks and initiatives every so often. Hell, I've rolled a few 20's on my death saves, which is always exciting. And then, I'll have a night like tonight: two crits, and lots of hitting. I spent an entire encounter with ongoing necrotic damage, though. :p
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Like everybody said, you cannot bargain with lady luck.  


However, I had a similar problem with my barbarian and found a handy solution.  For a few months, it seemed like my rolls were normal enough, except when using a daily power.  Anytime I tried to hit with my barbarian rages, I would routinely roll 5 or less.  

Best item I ever purchased:  dice of auspicious fortune.  It allows you to roll 3 dice at the beginning of the day.  During the day, once per encounter, you can use one of those three numbers in place of a die roll.  A typical roll for me is 15 9 4.  With the 9, I can get a success on a skill check if I am good with the skill.  Or I can get a hit in a situation where I have combat advantage or a buff from the cleric.  The 15 is a guaranteed hit with a daily power.  

It gets especially nice on those rare occasions where a 20 is rolled.  Being able to control when and on which power you roll a critical hit is powerful.      
It may not just be luck.  Some dice are slightly lopsided or contain air-bubbles that can lend to unbalanced rolls.  Invest in some precision dice.  I just played my first session with my new set, and I cannot tell you how great the difference is from my old, rounded ones.  My friend across the table, who also struggled with some unfortunate d20's, even vowed to buy a set himself.
Do check your dice to make sure they actually have all the numbers on (we have a couple of those d20s marked 1-10 twice floating around in our group, like CPNuke mentioned - we sometimes try to sneak them into the DM dice box :D)

I would also say check to make sure you're using a d20 (opposite sides always add up to 21) rather than a spindown counter (numbered 1-10 on one hemisphere, and 11-20 on the other) which will not roll fairly.

And yeah, grab some decent dice.  Or invest in a mess of crappy ones, and bin the ones which are consistently poor.  Crappy dice inevitably have some bad weighting due to the manufacturing process.
Harrying your Prey, the Easy Way: A Hunter's Handbook - the first of what will hopefully be many CharOp efforts on my part. The Blinker - teleport everywhere. An Eladrin Knight/Eldritch Knight. CB != rules source.
I bought some cheap dice a while back which looked nice, but some faces were uneven (I could tell by looking at the way light reflected off each face) which meant they wobbled on those faces and wouldn't settle easily on them. I stopped using them straight away.

I'd recommend some branded dice, such as chessex. As someone else mentioned, buy a few d20s and see which one "rolls best" for you.
I agree with everyone else, prescision dice are a reassuring buy if you roll poorly. Still, if you continue to have trouble with your rolls, you could always try to play a character whose roll (pun not intended) isn't to hit. A leader or defender for example. I know those particular specialties aren't for everyone(Our group doesn't even have a defender!), but if you arent too adverse to them, you could try it out. You'd still miss a lot if your problem continues, but at least your whole job wouldn't be TO hit.Tongue Out

Read an interesting artical form the Id DM that had to do the dice mojo and had to link it into this topic because it is oh so relevent:


theiddm.wordpress.com/2011/05/18/fk-you-...


Bottom line - the low rolls is probably just your perception.  Dice are just random number generators and don't have a tendency toward any particular number in general.  But if you don't like a set, buy another.  They are not that expensive really.  Or get an app for you phone if that is and option.  As long as the result is clear visible to multiple people, I think any reasonable person would allow it.


TjD

I had a die I was sure was rolling high, but I suspected this was just bias of perception.

And indeed this is what it turned out to be.  I physically did around 1000 rolls and tabled the results in Excel.  Final empirical average:  10.5
I have been going to a DnD  group now that meets about every month and plays for about 10 - 12 hours a gaming session.  I am getting the worst dice rolls it seems in the group, especially when it comes to rolling my d20.  I always seem to roll very low numbers on my attack rolls, rolling most of the time single digits and thus completely missing my target. This translates to my contribution to the group to not be very good and an inability to use my special moves due to poor dice rolls. 

I have been told by experienced players that I need to get a collection of dice and experiment rolling them to figure out which dice tend to roll high numbers and which set of dice tend to roll the low numbers.  I have played about 8 times now with the group and have yet to roll 1 single natural 20. The other players in the group seem to be rolling 5-6 natural 20's every gaming session !  Our DM has all the players around the same level and using the same builds, so on paper we are very evenly skilled, but when it comes to rolling the dice I seem the absolute worst in the group ! I always seem to roll my d20 low and it is rare to roll above a 9. 

Other players said I had really bad dice and to try their d20's and actually I do roll a lot better with their dice.  They come to the gaming session with bags of dice that is a mixture of many different sets of dice, I always come to the DnD sessions carrying in my hand the same single set I always roll with. I assumed all the dice were the same, but players tell me they shop around for dice till they find a set that tends to always roll high. They also carry lots of sets of dice instead of one just in case they seem to be rolling bad with one set they can switch to another set of dice and see what happens.

I tried rolling the dice different and shaking it more when I rolled, I even tried rolling it against a book or straight edge to give the dice more of a bounce, but still my d20 seems to always roll very low numbers.   It feels really discouraging because the other players seem to have no problems always rolling in the 16 - 20 range, and 5 out of 6 tries I always am getting single digit rolls. Our last gaming session that lasted about 10 hours. I rolled the whole night single digits, except for one 18 dice roll, a 14, and an 11. All others were single digits.


Any advice what am I doing wrong?



Is this for real?
The only solution to a misperception about random circumstances is to pile on more misperceptions that will run counter to the first misperception.

In other words, if you're unlucky with die rolls you should use voodoo, magic spells, telekinesis or The Force to change your luck.  Because if you believe it works, it works (as far as you know).

As for the precision dice out there ... yeah, they're made with more precision and are higher quality, but how much more precise than your existing dice ... who knows, and it may not result in a statistically significant difference in randomness.  YMMV.

OD&D, 1E and 2E challenged the player. 3E challenged the character, not the player. Now 4E takes it a step further by challenging a GROUP OF PLAYERS to work together as a TEAM. That's why I love 4E.

"Your ability to summon a horde of celestial superbeings at will is making my ... BMX skills look a bit redundant."

"People treat their lack of imagination as if it's the measure of what's silly. Which is silly." - Noon

"Challenge" is overrated.  "Immersion" is usually just a more pretentious way of saying "having fun playing D&D."

"Falling down is how you grow.  Staying down is how you die.  It's not what happens to you, it's what you do after it happens.”

The only solution to a misperception about random circumstances is to pile on more misperceptions that will run counter to the first misperception.

In other words, if you're unlucky with die rolls you should use voodoo, magic spells, telekinesis or The Force to change your luck.  Because if you believe it works, it works (as far as you know).

As for the precision dice out there ... yeah, they're made with more precision and are higher quality, but how much more precise than your existing dice ... who knows, and it may not result in a statistically significant difference in randomness.  YMMV.



Exactly.

I'll tell you what - take a d20 die that was not intentionally built to get a disporportionate number of 20s (not weighted, no double 20s on the surfaces of the die, etc...) and roll it on one continuous camera feed and get to 200 20s in less than 45 minutes using a die cup or another method of rolling that does not bias the die (sliding the die, plopping it so that is bounces without spinning much, etc...) .  Then post it on Youtube and post the link here.  I'd be surprised to see anyone get there with a die that is not obviously a cheater's die or using a rolling technique that is not biased.

The casinos worry about things like shaved dice because they have to worry about millions of rolls of a die and a very minor advantage has a serious impact on that number of rolls.  However, for an individual player, the number of rolls they are going to make is not large enough for most non-obvious shaving, etc... techniques to provide a significant advantage.  If 500 people roll a shaved die in a casino, they certainly feel it.  If only one does, neither the casino nor the player will feel it.

I'm not saying you can't get a significant advantage from a certain die that just happens to have the right number of accidental deviations from normal - I'm just saying that the vast majority of people that think they have such a die are mistaken.  The perception that a die rolls significantly better than average results is often far more impacted by the observers beliefes than by the actual observed results. 

D&D & Boardgames If I have everything I need to run great games for many years without repeating stuff, why do I need to buy anything right now?

In other words, if you're unlucky with die rolls you should use voodoo, magic spells, telekinesis or The Force to change your luck.  Because if you believe it works, it works (as far as you know).


  Actually, quantum physicists have done a study or two that suggest that the presence of the physicists themselves may actually be affecting the results of the experiments - they think it's theoretically possible that a certain type of particle shows up in a certain place because the scientists expect it to be there, lol...
It's bordering on make-your-brain-bleed territory, but it may actually work that way.
So, ya never know... Tongue Out

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I am the Magic Man.

(Pay no attention to the man behind the curtain.)

 

I am the Lawnmower Man.

(I AM GOD HERE!)

 

I am the Skull God.

(Koo Koo Ka Choo)

 

There are reasons they call me Mad...

I am also thinking of buying some stone dice? Anyone tried stone dice? I might want to buy online a set of obsidian because I always loved that very dark black color of obsidian stone or black blood stone dice. I just hope the hard stone wouldn't scratch the game table when rolled.

 Dice made out of anything other than plastic are really just for owning because they're freaking awesome. I don't personally know anyone who has dice made from alternate materials (stone, metal, gems, etc.) that actually plays with them on a regular basis.
Anything handmade rather than cast is going to have even more variance in weighting, unevenness, etc....

 For stone dice, especially ornamental stones like obsidian or bloodstone, you really have to worry more about the dice chipping than the table getting dented or scratched.

Show

I am the Magic Man.

(Pay no attention to the man behind the curtain.)

 

I am the Lawnmower Man.

(I AM GOD HERE!)

 

I am the Skull God.

(Koo Koo Ka Choo)

 

There are reasons they call me Mad...


 Dice made out of anything other than plastic are really just for owning because they're freaking awesome. I don't personally know anyone who has dice made from alternate materials (stone, metal, gems, etc.) that actually plays with them on a regular basis.
Anything handmade rather than cast is going to have even more variance in weighting, unevenness, etc....

 For stone dice, especially ornamental stones like obsidian or bloodstone, you really have to worry more about the dice chipping than the table getting dented or scratched.


I have a large d20 that's not plastic. I'm not certain what it's made of, though. It's too heavy to be plastic, but too light to be stone. Probably some kind of plaster or lightweight ceramic. /shrug.

The advantage of plastic dice is that they're cheap and lightweight. The advantage of non-plastic dice is that they often look and feel cooler. Whatever floats your boat. Ultimately, the material chosen WILL affect the odds of rolling certain numbers, but probably not moreso than the manufacturer, or any number of other factors.

My group refuses to touch Game Science dice, because they rarely roll above average. They are not as random as they claim. 
Ever feel like people on these forums can't possibly understand how wrong they are? Feeling trolled? Don't get mad. Report Post.

 Dice made out of anything other than plastic are really just for owning because they're freaking awesome. I don't personally know anyone who has dice made from alternate materials (stone, metal, gems, etc.) that actually plays with them on a regular basis.
Anything handmade rather than cast is going to have even more variance in weighting, unevenness, etc....

 For stone dice, especially ornamental stones like obsidian or bloodstone, you really have to worry more about the dice chipping than the table getting dented or scratched.



True if I use stone dice I might roll it on a carpet pad or a book. I would love to roll with stone dice. If they get ruined over time and I have to rebuy another pair for $30 thats fine. I would love to roll the obsidian in my hands and stare at the dark black color all night long while I play DnD 
One thing I think a lot of people don't notice when they roll, is the position of the pinkie finger of the rolling hand. Sometimes it curls over, knocking your die just enough to make it "extra random' (there's a real term for this but it escapes me, atm).

I never noticed it myself, but had the fortune/misfortune of a table-saw accident that resulted in the pinky of my rolling hand being cut off, and now I rarely roll lower than a 12!

I recommend you have your pinkie removed-works wonders! 
My dice are made from the horns of endangered white rhinos and bathed in the blood of virgin pandas. I had them blessed by a hoodoo priestess underneath a sanguine moon.

I only roll 20's.  I have to sleep with a hex-bag, and a ring of salt around my bed, otherwise the dread zombies will eat me in my sleep, but it's a small price to pay for the ultimate power of critting my players left and right.

You're not a true DnD player, IMO, until you become convinced that dice have their own flows of mojo.  All of the long-term players I know (which rounds out around a double dozen) all have their little rituals or other practices applied to their dice. 

I keep a yellow d20 in my dice bag.  This d20 always rolls bad.  It's purpose in the bag is to absorb all the bad luck juju from my other d20s.  Will it get all of it, no, does it get most of it, yes.  Do I realize I'm a little nuts for believing this, yes.  Will I get rid of this die, no.

There's nothing wrong with being a bit of an eccentric, it is DnD after all.
I have my one(only) d20 that I gt really mad at for weeks for giving me bad rolls.

A few weeks ago during the last session our DM was in town, we played at a different location then usual. Not onyl that, but we came up against an enemy my Blackguard made a blood oath to kill after he killed another PC(who could't make it to that dya's sessions anymore and was killed off as a result). Said boss was mad at me because we killed him(long story) a while ago and I stole is sword(that on a crit as a property, I can make a MBA).

First turn I could attack him, used a Daily, crit. MBA crit. MBA crit. MBA hit, boss dies.

We joked the dice don't want to make me an oath breaker. Our DM said I need to put it on a pedastal forever.
I would try rolling the dice a bunch of times out of game or between your turns to try to get all of the bad rolls out. Yes, the idea makes little to no logical sense, but at least it can help you feel better.

Or buy a couple extra D20s and roll them each a few times, picking out the one that gives you the best rolls.

Or just throw it against the wall whenever you need to roll until it decides to cooperate.
My Warlock went for several YEARS and did not hit anything - read my early blog posts - and it was a really big deal when I actually hit something.  Then I went to a convention and borrowed somebody else's dice for a while ... and I could roll double digits!  I bought new dice and quit using the old ones.  My accuracy is average now.

It Was The Dice.

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Making it up as I go along:

{BRJN} If I was writing the Tome of Lore, I would let Auppenser sleep. But I also would have him dream. In his dreaming he re-activates the innate powers of (some) mortal minds. Or his dreaming changes the nature of reality - currently very malleable thanks to Spellplague &c. Or whatever really cool flavor text and pseudo-science explanation people react positively to.

{Lord_Karsus} You know, I like that better than the explanations for the Spellplague.

 

{BRJN} If Bhaal approves of The Joker, does he approve of Jack Nicholson's portrayal or Heath Ledger's protrayal more?

{stigger} That question is utterly classic, and completely on target.

 

Prepped ahead of time:

I started the thread "1001 Failed Interrogation Results" (which seems to have faded into that great electronic goodnight, alas)

{ADHadh} These are all good and make sense! I just can't come up with something that's not covered here and is not completely ridiculous.

 

My 4e characters:

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Active:

LFR Half-elf StarLock8 Gondolin Nightstar

AoA Dwarf Guardian Druid8 Narvik from House Wavir

Character Ready-to-go:

Neverwinter Dwarven Invoker / Heir of Delzoun, worships Silvanus (!) "Truenamer" - speaks Words of Creation

Concepts I'm kicking around:

"Buggy" Wizard - insect flavor on everything.  His DMPC version is going to become a Lamia.  Becauae lichdom is so cliche.

Halfling Tempest Fighter - just because nobody else is doing it

Shifter Beast-o-phile Druid - for Nentir Vale campaign

Good to see your average now, I can relate to horrable die rolls, In one quest I was the group fighter and missed nearly every attack while the party cleric and rogue hit at least 70% of time and it was frusrating as hell and I felt like I was not even part of the group and unless or my rogue that has a +15 mod in a skill and lucky if I get above a 25 where as another player in our group has a +12 and gets 30s every damn roll, if he is cheating or not is up to debate through ;)

Dice can just hate you for no reason at times them mean old dice!
A trick we use is to roll a d20 ten times.  Then, we write the resulting numbers down.  Anytime we would normally roll a d20 (such as an attack), we can instead choose from our pre-rolled list of numbers (and add modifiers).  We pull from the list 'til all the numbers have been used, then we roll ten more numbers.

For example, here's a list of numbers I once rolled for a session:  1 2 3 5 6 7 7 10 13 18; all pretty average. I blew the 1 pretty quickly, on an initiative check (once I knew my teammates had the upper hand in the order).  The 18 was my ace-in-the-hole of course.  Really helped save the day against the hobgoblin mercenaries.  Took the chief out early and the others were willing to be reasonable ;).

D&D is still a game of likely (and unlikely) probabilities but now there's a minor bit of resource allocation thrown in.  If I can invest more into the action than its level of difficulty, then I'll succeed; I'll get out what I put in.  Having the randomly determined numbers written down in front of me ahead of time is the trick.

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One of the better lists of numbers I've actually rolled:  1 2 3 5 6 14 15 18 18 19.  Two 18s and a 19.  The 14 was nuthin' to sniff at either ;).  BTW Someone once mentioned this trick on these message boards and I just picked it up.
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erdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Unless you want find a place that will certify your dice, you can't blame them. Most of what players call high rolling dice is just a lot of superstition. 

erdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"> Someone mentioned that you could be rolling bad and another said that it is impossible to "roll bad" They're both right, make sure your dice roll. as in they make several revolutions on the table. Don't just drop them straight out of your hand onto the table. (When I was younger, my brother and I figured out how to cheat by dropping D6s. To this day I cringe when people drop their dice. As a DM I occasionally go so far as to ask the player to toss their dice next time.)

One of my fellow player has some dice that keep rolling forever and we'd have to hand them back across the table each round. I let her rummage through my pound o dice till she found some with sharper edges. In-between turns she rolled them to see which stopped the shortest. 
I tend to roll my dice in the direction of some sort of backstop (like the spine of my players handbook) 

Finally, sometimes you will roll a 1 during that critical moment and no training will help you. (except powers and  feats that allow your to re-roll ;)  
I had a similar problem with low d20 rolls when I first started playing D&D4. It wasn't problem with 3E because (in my experience) the target numbers were generally lower. But in the first 4E campaign I played, I couldn't hit anything, mainly because my d20 rolls never got into double digits. My character was a laughingstock, I was not having a good time, and I was just about ready to give up on the whole thing.

Then I saw the YouTube video from Game Science, and resolved to pick up a set of their dice. My game changed immediately. In short, the GS dice are balanced, and the other brands I've tried (pick one, I've tried most) are NOT balanced. Ever since then, I flatly refuse to play D&D without my GS dice. I know they'll roll low as often as they roll high, or somewhere in-between, but that's the whole point.