Game of Thrones Setting and Player problems

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I am currently thnking of doing a campaign with a storyline simmilar to game of thrones, but im not very good with all the politics and such, and would appricate some advice on the matter.

Also i am having a problem with 1 player not paying attention, wanting to insert sex in nearly every situation,does not pay attention to the game, and has an attitude problem and i am tired of it, this player is the fiance of our former DM, who just stepped down as a result of her attitude. I am trying to run a clean game as clean as i can anyway, there are several children in the room at the time and my girlfriend is going to be joining us next week.
Can't help you with the first problem, but the second is easy.

Address her directly, in private.  Tell her there is no sex in this game because there are children, and tell her that she will need to start paying attention.  Address her attitude problem directly and specifically, citing individual incidents if at all possible.  Inform her that, if her behavior does not change, she will not be returning to the game.
Another day, another three or four entries to my Ignore List.
I think the problem kind of got taken care of tonight, but since we're under a new DM i don't know, im not fond of the new dm and his style which is why im working on my own campaign.
To be fair, A Song of Ice and Fire is a world dripping with sex.  Sex drives the entire plot, defeats heroes, topples kingdoms, and is a key component in the most powerful spells.  If you want a family-friendly game, I'd pick a different setting.
Politics are difficult in any setting. Start out light to get practice. It's possible the players wont be into it, so figure that out before you worry yourself too much.

As for the sexy stuff, yeah its funny once ib a while, but also gets creepy pretty quick. If you are uncomfortable speaking directly to the problem player, then address her fiance.
If its sex for story plot, thats fine but when it gets to the point shes (Content Removed), it gets really annoying.

(ORC_Chaos: Edited-Inappropriate Content is against the Code of Conduct
If its sex for story plot, thats fine but when it gets to the point shes (Content Removed), it gets really annoying.



Yeah, that definitely warrants a 'stop that or go away' ultimatum.



Another day, another three or four entries to my Ignore List.
I would also love to turn the opening scene in game of thrones into an encounter, not sure how to make the white walkers though, seeing as they are undead and nearly unkillable.
I would also love to turn the opening scene in game of thrones into an encounter, not sure how to make the white walkers though, seeing as they are undead and nearly unkillable.



That kind of encounter goes against the grain for the vast majority of d&d players out there.  d&d is not a book or a show.  In d&d, for every pc who dies, 99 monsters die.  Trying to get a party to retreat from even a very obviously superior foe is often an uphill battle.  No matter how many hints you drop about how unkillable the monster is, most parties will suffer at least 33% mortality before they even consider a retreat. 
the idea is, they see how easily they kill the 3 NPCs, and if the pary leader has any brains, he'll run, and they'll never enoucnter them again untill later in the campaign. kind of a prelude to whats in store for later on when they're better equipped. Things i know about them, they can raise thier own wights, obsidian kills them instantly, and nearly invincible, and are supposedly extinct (we know diffrently). i always give my players a way out. The walker wouldnt attack the players, more or less send a message. kind of like what the one in the opening did, he didnt kill Will, just sent a message.
the idea is, they see how easily they kill the 3 NPCs, and if the pary leader has any brains, he'll run, and they'll never enoucnter them again untill later in the campaign. kind of a prelude to whats in store for later on when they're better equipped. Things i know about them, they can raise thier own wights, obsidian kills them instantly, and nearly invincible, and are supposedly extinct (we know diffrently). i always give my players a way out. The walker wouldnt attack the players, more or less send a message. kind of like what the one in the opening did, he didnt kill Will, just sent a message.



Actually if you wanted to I would do something like this, have them make two sets of characters (or you can make one set and suprise them which is probably a better idea).  Start them off with the disposables, until they are killed by the white walkers, then switch to the other characters.  Bam! just like A Game of Thrones.  
I would also love to turn the opening scene in game of thrones into an encounter, not sure how to make the white walkers though, seeing as they are undead and nearly unkillable.



That kind of encounter goes against the grain for the vast majority of d&d players out there.  d&d is not a book or a show.  In d&d, for every pc who dies, 99 monsters die.  Trying to get a party to retreat from even a very obviously superior foe is often an uphill battle.  No matter how many hints you drop about how unkillable the monster is, most parties will suffer at least 33% mortality before they even consider a retreat. 



Oh, I don't know.  If I were running a SOIaF campaign I'd be sure to make it very clear to my players to have several characters and not to get too attached.  The group might each have a PC at the wall, each have a PC at King's Landing, each have a PC on the Dothraki sea, etc.  This would help to allow for SoIaF's multiple-vantage-points story telling while also keeping the players from getting to attached to their PCs.

And yes, on day one I'd just hand them premade characters to introduce the setting before they roll up their first batch of PCs.  They'd get teamwiped, but because they were characters I'd slapped together for them they'd not likely care, and it would give them a healthy dose of fear for when characters they do care about face the walkers again.
the idea is, they see how easily they kill the 3 NPCs, and if the pary leader has any brains, he'll run, and they'll never enoucnter them again untill later in the campaign. kind of a prelude to whats in store for later on when they're better equipped. Things i know about them, they can raise thier own wights, obsidian kills them instantly, and nearly invincible, and are supposedly extinct (we know diffrently). i always give my players a way out. The walker wouldnt attack the players, more or less send a message. kind of like what the one in the opening did, he didnt kill Will, just sent a message.



Actually if you wanted to I would do something like this, have them make two sets of characters (or you can make one set and suprise them which is probably a better idea).  Start them off with the disposables, until they are killed by the white walkers, then switch to the other characters.  Bam! just like A Game of Thrones.  



Whelp, looks like I'm late to the "kill the pregens to give them fear" idea.
There's an existing Game of Thrones RPG, though I'm not sure what system it's built on, I do know that it's kind of old.

If you wanted to do a specific Game of Thrones setting then I'd say just use the book (the GoT RPG book).  If you want something in the Game of Thrones style then go for a world with one ruling party, where a king dies and several different factions emerge to vie for control of the realm. 

Trying to make your campaign a shot for shot remake of the book is going to be a mistake.  First of all, those books jump from scene to scene to scene to scene.  Because it's storytelling that relies on multiple viewpoints. 

The problem here is getting your players to deal with the narrative structure.  On one hand, you could have them make multiple characters, all belonging to a different faction / narration of the story, with the ultimate plan of bringing them together at some point.  On another, you could have them choose a side in a war for a kingdom.

There's problems with both of those.  Too many characters is a problem for experienced DnD players, and if your players aren't experts in DnD this will be overwhelming.  Also, the amount of time you as a DM will have to do for this preparation is insane and you're likely to burn yourself out. 

Choosing sides is a problem, as each player, based on their specific backgrounds, may want to ally themselves with different factions.  And without an adventure hook to grab the party as a whole, you're going to start with a house divided.

The easy way would be to have the party start as criminals on their way to join the Night's Watch.  And have them deal with the real threats to the realm, feeling better about themselves while the rest of the nobles of the kingdoms drink, fornicate, and fight each other.  And at some point, when the threat becomes dire, the players may have to act as ambassadors to the warring kingdoms, to convince them to help the Night's Watch with their war beyond the wall.

Also, are we complaining about girls talking about sex?  And her fiancee bailed on being the DM because he couldn't stand her...  I see a relationship heading towards an end.  And also... I see an in.
It sounds like the former DM/fiance of the "problem" player isn't exactly critically hittin' it at home and she's choosing to express her frustration at the game. I got a solution to that - invite her over an hour before the game. You can fill in the rest (so to speak), so I don't get moderated.

As to the Game of Thrones bit, I'll give you one thing I've learned: Don't waste time on stuff you're not good at. If you're not good at political games, don't run one. Play to your strengths and you can't go wrong. You may be in love with the idea now, but when you're two sessions in and it's not going the way you hoped, you're going to wish you had spent your prep time doing something else.

With regard to the white walker scene, no. There isn't a good, predictable way to strike fear into the hearts of the players or "demonstrate a monster's danger" such that you can plan for it. In most cases, you'll either frustrate yourself or the players trying to reach that point. In D&D, the best thing you can do is make the scene interesting and let the dice and player mistakes make it scary for them.

No amount of tips, tricks, or gimmicks will ever be better than simply talking directly to your fellow players to resolve your issues.
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It doesn't matter how many NPCs they see the walkers slaughter in one go.  You put those NPCs in there to die, and they'll smell that.  They're going to perceive those characters differently than their player characters, because they weren't the heroes of the story.  That turns this encounter into a potentially lethal one question reading quiz, the survivors being the ones who recognize white walkers and remember that there are no heroes in the Song of Ice and Fire.

A better way to set the tone might be to have them find out about the walkers through other people.  Have them hear reports and rumors that the terrible monsters of their childhood stories have been discovered in the woods.  Send them on rangings into deserted villages with clues that suggest that the reports might have been true.  Give them tough fights against people fleeing the wights, people who are so desperate to escape them that they'll rush to a sworn enemy to beg for sanctuary.  Present them with other monsters who flee before the walkers and will choose a clean death then and there over being turned back out into their own homeland.  don't use the walkers as units for encounters; use them as the bogeymen that motivate the party's enemies for the first few levels.



  
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My suggestion is to base it either in the actual realm or something just like it. Have the players on the wall (closest to a traditional dnd setting with monsters, etc.) And have them go on scouting missions. Try having them do mock combats with trainers at the Wall and have their (much superior) trainers wiped out by wights. That'll give a healthy dose of fear.
After a lot of adventuring up north of the wall, have the Lord Commander call the banners for a march against some house or other (have all the houses warring like they are in ASoIaF), and the players can either choose to stay and defend the wall or leave and attack the rebels. If they leave, you've gotten them involved in the politics and have a starting point for that story arc. Plus, just when it looks like they've won, the Wall may be overrun and force the realm to unite. If they stay, they face an army of wights on one side and a vengeful house on the other (which, depending on the house, may send a new ***hole of a Lord Commander up).