What does Dispense Justice?!

7 posts / 0 new
Last post
Can some1 explain to me what Dispense Justice does? It reads:

Target player sacrifices an attacking creature.

Blocking creatures are not considered attacking creatures?
This card makes a target player, that you target that the time that you cast the spell, sacrifice a creature that they are in control of that is attacking at the time that you cast the card.

If you cast this spell before you opponent declares attackers or after the combat phase is over, it will have no effect.  You will cast it.  You will target a player.  That player will not have any creatures that are attacking at that time, therefore they will not be required to sacrifice anything.  Only creatures that are under control of the player whos turn it is, and are in the mode of attacking another player or planeswalker are considered attacking creatures.  Blocking creatures are not considered attacking creatures.  Creatures that are not attacking during the attack phase of the player that controls them, are not considered attacking.  Once the targeted player selects the creature to sacrifice, it is moved to the graveyard, unless there is something else in play that would cause it to go elsewhere.  Darksteel Colossus is an example of something that would be moved somewhere besides the graveyard after it is sacrificed.

If you control 3 or more artifacts the targeted player will be required to sacrifice 2 attacking creatures if there are 2 creatures that are attacking.

You're a lose cannon.

 

 

"I played 70 card decks before it was cool to play 70 card decks." -Random M:tG hipster

WHen your opponent has declared attackers and preferably before you assign blockers and they're forced to sacrifice an attacking creature, 2 of them if you control 3 or more artifacts.



It's easily one of the best kill cards in the game cause it gets around hexproof and indestructible and if you time it right it often seals the game in but appearantly it's also kinda confusing due to targeting players cause a few opponents have used this on themselves while attacking me and were forced to sacrifice their own creatures or played it or when I was attacking after blocking or not even attacking at all.



I've seen people mess up on Hold The Line card for knights about 6 times now were it fizzled and did nothing because my opponent played it right after I attacked an before declaring blockers.



OK, it's clear, tnx for answering. I'm getting extremely fed up with how things are worded here. Blockers are not attackers, ok, did not think of it and with hindsight I can agree with that. But in the same literal sense: if a festering kobold is destroyed, had can it use its ability to cast 1 damage to an opposing creature? Realise he is destroyed, or sacrificed, not killed, which triggers his ability. Now granted, destruction or sacrification leads to the same effect, namely, you don't live anymore. However, the ruleslawyer in me says: it says sacrificed, not killed...

Oh well, I'll have to live with that.
OK, it's clear, tnx for answering. I'm getting extremely fed up with how things are worded here. Blockers are not attackers, ok, did not think of it and with hindsight I can agree with that. But in the same literal sense: if a festering kobold is destroyed, had can it use its ability to cast 1 damage to an opposing creature? Realise he is destroyed, or sacrificed, not killed, which triggers his ability. Now granted, destruction or sacrification leads to the same effect, namely, you don't live anymore. However, the ruleslawyer in me says: it says sacrificed, not killed...

Oh well, I'll have to live with that.



Sacrifice means that the controlling player must kill their own creature by scarificing it.  This is incredibly powerful as it bypasses things like Shroud or Hexproof as you would be unable to target them directly.  It is obvious that you are new to Magic so please be patient with the rules.  The cards are all worded in a very specific manner to avoid such confusion and while there are still some cards that can be confusing, Dispense Justice is not one of them as it does exactly what it says.  It forces the targetted player to sacrifice an attacking creature or creatures with metalcraft active.
OK, it's clear, tnx for answering. I'm getting extremely fed up with how things are worded here. Blockers are not attackers, ok, did not think of it and with hindsight I can agree with that. But in the same literal sense: if a festering kobold is destroyed, had can it use its ability to cast 1 damage to an opposing creature? Realise he is destroyed, or sacrificed, not killed, which triggers his ability. Now granted, destruction or sacrification leads to the same effect, namely, you don't live anymore. However, the ruleslawyer in me says: it says sacrificed, not killed...

Oh well, I'll have to live with that.

Sacrifice means that the controlling player must kill their own creature by scarificing it.  This is incredibly powerful as it bypasses things like Shroud or Hexproof as you would be unable to target them directly.  It is obvious that you are new to Magic so please be patient with the rules.  The cards are all worded in a very specific manner to avoid such confusion and while there are still some cards that can be confusing, Dispense Justice is not one of them as it does exactly what it says.  It forces the targetted player to sacrifice an attacking creature or creatures with metalcraft active.

Sounded like he was getting stumbled up on the new "dies" wording, which I'm assuming Festering Goblin is upgraded with. I can see how this can be confusing, considering a lot of new players are told that most definition/actions have a strict meaning in terms of game rules, as we just described with attacking and defending creatures, or the usual targeting issues with shroud/hexproof/pro-X for another example. Now in addition to this, some common words are actually keywords used to denote a game ruling or action which can create another learning barrier that new players need to familiarize themselves with. So "dies" in this case has the special meaning of "put into a graveyard from the battlefield". Using that old wording in place of dies for Festering Goblin, it actually makes a lot of sense that any non-exiling killing method will trigger the Goblin.

OK, it's clear, tnx for answering. I'm getting extremely fed up with how things are worded here. Blockers are not attackers, ok, did not think of it and with hindsight I can agree with that. But in the same literal sense: if a festering kobold is destroyed, had can it use its ability to cast 1 damage to an opposing creature? Realise he is destroyed, or sacrificed, not killed, which triggers his ability. Now granted, destruction or sacrification leads to the same effect, namely, you don't live anymore. However, the ruleslawyer in me says: it says sacrificed, not killed...

Oh well, I'll have to live with that.




well, "killed" doesnt exist, just "dies", which means "put into a graveyard from battlefield" (as brodo explained). So, destroying festering goblin with go for the throat, sacrificing it with barter in blood, killing it with volcanic hammer or in combat will trigger its ability, because either way it goes to the graveyard (by the way its not damage, its P/T reduction, which is different). The only card i can think doesnt trigger the ability is path to exile, exiling is a different zone (not shown in dopt) than the graveyard.  
Sign In to post comments