Domination attacks

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If a PC dominates a monster and the attack power says "attack enemy",  can that monster attack one of his own allies since his allies are not his enemies?
If a PC dominates a monster and the attack power says "attack enemy",  can that monster attack one of his own allies

Nope. Per the rules update: "In spite of this condition, the creature’s allies remain its allies, and its enemies remain its enemies."

Sometimes I hate the English language.  lol.  After reading the question and the answer.... it appears to me that the question is asking something else from what the answer was answering.  Sorry if I'm wrong about this.  

If this is true:   "In spite of this condition, the creature’s allies remain its allies, and its enemies remain its enemies."  This means, that a creature can continue attacking me and my allies since we remain his enemy.

Doesn't this make 'dominate' worthless and unnecessary to the game?  So was the rule actually suppose to mean....

(example).

Say that my character dominates a monster.... that monster is now my ally.  This in turn makes my allies his ally.  He cannot attack his (new) allies, but can attack my enemies which are now his (new) enemies (or atleast until the dominate ends).


If this is not the case, can someone help me understand why dominate has any value in D&D?  
If this is not the case, can someone help me understand why dominate has any value in D&D?  

As mvincent explained, when a monster is dominated, its "allies" and "enemies" do not change.

However, most attacks target "creatures" -- meaning enemies or allies -- so they can affect a monster's allies.

The dominated condition has a lot of value.

It allows the PC controlling the dominated monster to force it to attack one of its allies, or hinder it in other ways.  For example, the dominated monster might run past PCs (provoking opportunity attacks), drop prone, jump into a pit or other hazardous terrain, etc.
Sometimes I hate the English language.  lol.



;_;
Sometimes I hate the English language.  lol.



;_;



LOL....  now that's pretty funny.



Also, Thanks for clearing things up Logopolis.  The key to understanding this is in "creatures".  Thanks. 
Ignorance has striken me again, and I now have another question regarding "Dominate".  

Say we take a character with the power called "Siren Voice", it is a standard action that on a hit will dominate the target till the end of my next turn or until it is attacked.

If this allows me to use any of the targets powers that state it can target a "creature"... would that be my next standard attack? or a minor attack? or would that use my action which is what-ever the targets power required?

I am not sure if I worded my question correctly, so just let me know if I should make another attempt at wording it.

Thanks for any help guys/gals (we all know gals don't play... j/k).    
Link to the Dominated Condition Definition in the Online Compendium

You can also find it defined in the Player's Handbook, p 277, though this has been heavily updated. Updates can be found here, or you can click here to download/open the Player's Handbook updates directly.

These rules can also be found in the Rules Compendium, p 230.

Looking any of those places, you will see that you do not spend actions to give a dominated creature a command. Instead, on the dominated creature's turn, the dominator chooses one action for the dominated creature to take.

"Not only are you wrong, but I even created an Excel spreadsheet to show you how wrong you are." --James Wyatt, May 2006

Dilige, et quod vis fac

Much thanks, Cohen95.  I appreciate the answer and the links!  The links will help me further my understanding.
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