Rituals or Powers for Consecrating/Holy Ground

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I did a quick search through the compendium for things like "consecrate," "desecrate," and, "defile." The usual keywords for some of the old spells that used to make holy ground and similar protections against evilness (without being "Protection Against Evil").

Anyone know where I should look for these? Or what terms I need to plug into the compendium?

58286228 wrote:
As a DM, I find it easier to just punish the players no matter what they pick, as I assume they will pick stuff that is broken. I mean, fight after fight they kill all the monsters without getting killed themselves! What sort of a game is this, anyway?

 

An insightful observation about the nature of 4e, and why it hasn't succeeded as well as other editions. (from the DDN General Discussions, 2014-05-07)

Rundell wrote:

   

Emerikol wrote:

       

Foxface wrote:

        4e was the "modern" D&D, right?  The one that had design notes that drew from more modern games, and generally appealed to those who preferred the design priorities of modern games.  I'm only speculating, but I'd hazard a guess that those same 4e players are the ones running the wide gamut of other games at Origins.

       
        D&D 4e players are pretty much by definition the players who didn't mind, and often embraced, D&D being "different".  That willingness to embrace the different might also mean they are less attached to 4e itself, and are willing to go elsewhere.

    This is a brilliant insight.  I was thinking along those lines myself.  

 

    There are so many tiny indie games that if you added them all together they would definitely rival Pathfinder.   If there were a dominant game for those people it would do better but there is no dominant game.  Until 4e, the indie people were ignored by the makers of D&D.

 

Yep. 4E was embraced by the 'system matters' crowd who love analyzing and innovating systems. That crowd had turned its back on D&D as a clunky anachronism. But with 4E, their design values were embraced and validated. 4E was D&D for system-wonks. And with support for 4E pulled, the system-wonks have moved on to other systems. The tropes and traditions of D&D never had much appeal for them anyway. Now there are other systems to learn and study. It's like boardgamegeeks - always a new system on the horizon. Why play an ancient games that's seven years old?

 

Of course, not all people who play and enjoy 4E fit that mould. I'm running a 4E campaign right now, and my long-time D&D players are enjoying it fine. But with the system-wonks decamping, the 4E players-base lost the wind in its sails.

They don't exist any more.

With very few exceptions, there is very little in the way of mechanics that interact with alignment. There are Rituals that will ward an area, but nothing that will actually forbid entry for an extended period of time.

Your DM is free to create something like this as a plot point, but it should be incredibly rare.
There is Magic Circle in PHB1.  You pick a creature type and block out or trap in creatures lower than your arcana check.

The similar powers in 4E are generally cleric daily attacks or utilties that create zones that do things like autodamage enemies and buff or heal allies.  Other classes might have similar ones, but the cleric has a lot like hallowed ground, gravesite, and consecrated ground.
I picked up the Redeemer of the Desecrated theme for a PC in a home game. It's already built into the campaign that, years and years ago, an evil necromancer ruled the land.

Part of what I do is travelling to ruins and occupied places and sanctifying them after the party clears them out. I was looking for a mechanical way to bless the land and prevent it from being retaken by the forces of evil (or just stopping residual undead badness from continuing to happen, should I come upon, say, a graveyard being used for a zombie army).

58286228 wrote:
As a DM, I find it easier to just punish the players no matter what they pick, as I assume they will pick stuff that is broken. I mean, fight after fight they kill all the monsters without getting killed themselves! What sort of a game is this, anyway?

 

An insightful observation about the nature of 4e, and why it hasn't succeeded as well as other editions. (from the DDN General Discussions, 2014-05-07)

Rundell wrote:

   

Emerikol wrote:

       

Foxface wrote:

        4e was the "modern" D&D, right?  The one that had design notes that drew from more modern games, and generally appealed to those who preferred the design priorities of modern games.  I'm only speculating, but I'd hazard a guess that those same 4e players are the ones running the wide gamut of other games at Origins.

       
        D&D 4e players are pretty much by definition the players who didn't mind, and often embraced, D&D being "different".  That willingness to embrace the different might also mean they are less attached to 4e itself, and are willing to go elsewhere.

    This is a brilliant insight.  I was thinking along those lines myself.  

 

    There are so many tiny indie games that if you added them all together they would definitely rival Pathfinder.   If there were a dominant game for those people it would do better but there is no dominant game.  Until 4e, the indie people were ignored by the makers of D&D.

 

Yep. 4E was embraced by the 'system matters' crowd who love analyzing and innovating systems. That crowd had turned its back on D&D as a clunky anachronism. But with 4E, their design values were embraced and validated. 4E was D&D for system-wonks. And with support for 4E pulled, the system-wonks have moved on to other systems. The tropes and traditions of D&D never had much appeal for them anyway. Now there are other systems to learn and study. It's like boardgamegeeks - always a new system on the horizon. Why play an ancient games that's seven years old?

 

Of course, not all people who play and enjoy 4E fit that mould. I'm running a 4E campaign right now, and my long-time D&D players are enjoying it fine. But with the system-wonks decamping, the 4E players-base lost the wind in its sails.

I don't see why you & your DM couldn't come up with a custom Ritual for that purpose. It would be mostly flavor (cuz if the DM wants to get around this consecration for story purposes using more potent undead, he can), but it'll reinforce your character's place and purpose. The other thing your character could do is make sure the dead are buried properly, so they won't rise again (more flavor).
4e D&D is not a "Tabletop MMO." It is not Massively Multiplayer, and is usually not played Online. Come up with better descriptions of your complaints, cuz this one means jack ****.
Fair enough. Thought I'd go fishing to see if 4e covered this, since last edition had consecrate/desecrate (temporary) and hallow/unhallow (permanent, or renewable, depending on what you wanted to attach to the hallowed status).

Guess I'll have to talk with the DM for a more home-brew solution to keep the Highlanders in check, I suppose.

Thanks!

58286228 wrote:
As a DM, I find it easier to just punish the players no matter what they pick, as I assume they will pick stuff that is broken. I mean, fight after fight they kill all the monsters without getting killed themselves! What sort of a game is this, anyway?

 

An insightful observation about the nature of 4e, and why it hasn't succeeded as well as other editions. (from the DDN General Discussions, 2014-05-07)

Rundell wrote:

   

Emerikol wrote:

       

Foxface wrote:

        4e was the "modern" D&D, right?  The one that had design notes that drew from more modern games, and generally appealed to those who preferred the design priorities of modern games.  I'm only speculating, but I'd hazard a guess that those same 4e players are the ones running the wide gamut of other games at Origins.

       
        D&D 4e players are pretty much by definition the players who didn't mind, and often embraced, D&D being "different".  That willingness to embrace the different might also mean they are less attached to 4e itself, and are willing to go elsewhere.

    This is a brilliant insight.  I was thinking along those lines myself.  

 

    There are so many tiny indie games that if you added them all together they would definitely rival Pathfinder.   If there were a dominant game for those people it would do better but there is no dominant game.  Until 4e, the indie people were ignored by the makers of D&D.

 

Yep. 4E was embraced by the 'system matters' crowd who love analyzing and innovating systems. That crowd had turned its back on D&D as a clunky anachronism. But with 4E, their design values were embraced and validated. 4E was D&D for system-wonks. And with support for 4E pulled, the system-wonks have moved on to other systems. The tropes and traditions of D&D never had much appeal for them anyway. Now there are other systems to learn and study. It's like boardgamegeeks - always a new system on the horizon. Why play an ancient games that's seven years old?

 

Of course, not all people who play and enjoy 4E fit that mould. I'm running a 4E campaign right now, and my long-time D&D players are enjoying it fine. But with the system-wonks decamping, the 4E players-base lost the wind in its sails.

I picked up the Redeemer of the Desecrated theme for a PC in a home game. It's already built into the campaign that, years and years ago, an evil necromancer ruled the land.

Part of what I do is travelling to ruins and occupied places and sanctifying them after the party clears them out. I was looking for a mechanical way to bless the land and prevent it from being retaken by the forces of evil (or just stopping residual undead badness from continuing to happen, should I come upon, say, a graveyard being used for a zombie army).



That's 100% pure plot device, really.
Another day, another three or four entries to my Ignore List.
 " The usual keywords for some of the old spells that used to make holy ground and similar protections against evilness (without being "Protection Against Evil").

Anyone know where I should look for these? Or what terms I need to plug into the compendium?

The Hallowed Temple ritual or the Hallowed Ground Cleric power do something like that, but probably won't suit your needs.

There are a couple of rituals that can prevent undead from intruding upon an area (and/or make it more difficult to create new undead in the area). This is probably a more fitting approach than trying to sanctify the area against generic 'evil', especially since 4E no longer assumes that 'evil' and 'undead' are more or less on the same side - 'evil' faiths are just as likely to want to sanctify their holy sites against undead intrusion!

Your character's overall mission does fall under 'plot device' more than specific mechanic though. Once you've stopped whatever bad thing is going on there, the sanctification process is mainly a matter of exposition rather than power use.
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