Quick Rule Clarification

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Hi All,

Please just jog my memory on these 2 rules,its been a while.

1.Does a lvl 11 augmenting whetstones giving +3,stack with a +2 weapon giving +5,or does it make the weapon +3

2.Availability of common,uncommen and rare items.

Common = anywhere
Uncommon = ?
Rare = only available if dm allows

What i am asking is the availability of uncommon items ,ie 50% 75%  
         
I look forward to your replies.

Thankyou        
1.Does a lvl 11 augmenting whetstones giving +3,stack with a +2 weapon giving +5,or does it make the weapon +3

Depends on the types of the bonuses. I believe they're both enhancement bonuses, so they wouldn't stack. (Edit: Yes, they're both enhancement bonuses, so they don't stack.)

2.Availability of common,uncommen and rare items.

Common = anywhere
Uncommon = ?
Rare = only available if dm allows

Uncommon are also only if the DM allows. The difference is that a PC is expected to have numerous Uncommon items and only 1 or maybe 2 rares per tier.

If I have to ask the GM for it, then I don't want it.

IIRC, the suggested percentage or rarities was 10% rare, 40% uncommon and 50% common.  PCs should average one rare item per tier.  This is not from any of the rulebooks, it was from a developer column I read a while back ... so don't quote me on this.

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IIRC, the suggested percentage or rarities was 10% rare, 40% uncommon and 50% common.  PCs should average one rare item per tier.  This is not from any of the rulebooks, it was from a developer column I read a while back ... so don't quote me on this.

I don't understand that. Why would a DM ever both putting out common items except in special circumstances? There are only about 170 common items, and a much wider array of uncommons.

If a DM were trying to set up a specific situation such as an region where powerful items are banned, or he needed to throttle character power level a little, then I could see a liberal distribution of common items. Other than that I don't see placing them at all, except for the consumables. I think of common items as things PCs buy or make for themselves rather than find.

If I have to ask the GM for it, then I don't want it.

Yes but there are two reasons to find common items.

1) it adds realism to the world.  You're not only going to find uncommon items.

2) there may be some common items that your PC's will be needing, and may not have, in the current encounter.  Maybe they find 20 feet of hemp rope in the room before a 15 foot pit, or a lantern before heading down into the mines. 

70% of the time I add common items into the list of found treasures.  It also allows for a leveling between rolling a 5 and rolling a 20 when they are looking around.

IMAGE(http://www.nodiatis.com/pub/23.jpg)

Yes but there are two reasons to find common items.

1) it adds realism to the world.  You're not only going to find uncommon items.

2) there may be some common items that your PC's will be needing, and may not have, in the current encounter.  Maybe they find 20 feet of hemp rope in the room before a 15 foot pit, or a lantern before heading down into the mines. 

70% of the time I add common items into the list of found treasures.  It also allows for a leveling between rolling a 5 and rolling a 20 when they are looking around.

I assumed we were talking about magical items.

Since the rarity system is somewhat arbitrary, I don't think it increases the realism to go out of one's way to sprinkle common magic items about. Go by what the PCs would like to have, which won't generally be common items.

If I have to ask the GM for it, then I don't want it.

My bad, I have been working on a warehouse scene and have mundane items on the brain.

Even so, common items are that common.  You are bound to find them, if you didn't they wouldn't be "common".  You can list them off, doesn't mean that the PC needs to take them and as I stated it gives you a range for their rolls when giving out items.   When I'm compiling my lists I don't limit it to what the PC's want, I make it to what I would feel would be reasonably in the location.  

 

IMAGE(http://www.nodiatis.com/pub/23.jpg)

Yes but there are two reasons to find common items.

1) it adds realism to the world.  You're not only going to find uncommon items.

2) there may be some common items that your PC's will be needing, and may not have, in the current encounter.  Maybe they find 20 feet of hemp rope in the room before a 15 foot pit, or a lantern before heading down into the mines. 

70% of the time I add common items into the list of found treasures.  It also allows for a leveling between rolling a 5 and rolling a 20 when they are looking around.



I prefer to allow the players to use storytelling to establish the existence of the mundane in context rather than consciously make the effort in my design. A certain location can easily suggest that certain items may be found in it and if the players needs a mundane thing to do something cool, they find it as long as it makes sense. "We're near the docks - there must be a length of rope around here somewhere, right?" I like to empower the players to establish things about the story and world without "permission" per se from me as a means of shared storytelling.

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common items = common magic items

common items are not mundane items
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