Long Jump Control

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When attempting to long jump, can you control the distance you jump? Say you clear 3 squares, can you choose to land before that?

Thanks.

Nominrath 
Yes, you can always choose to move less than your maximum distance with willing movement.
That's really hard to say.  I'm of the view that once you are committed to the jump, you cannot change your velocity to jump less than the distance indicated by the Ahtletics roll.  I get this interpretation from the following:

If the creature ends the movement over a drop, it falls and can’t move any farther as part of the current action. If the creature runs out of movement before landing, it also falls. However, if the jump was part of a move action, the creature can continue the jump as part of a double move, ending the first move action in midair and continuing the jump as part of the second move action. The creature makes a single Athletics check for the jump but can use squares of movement from both actions for it.



I bolded the relevant sentence.  If you could jump less distance than the roll would indicate, that sentence would not be needed.  In other words, if you know from the Athletics roll that your jump would exceed your total movement, then you would never exceed your movement by landing sooner (unless you are doing a double move).

The question comes into play is that once you are in the air for the jump, is the jump still willing movement?  I say not because you cannot change your direction once you are in the air and you cannot change your velocity to speed up or slow down once you are in the air.  You are forced to go the distance and direction of the jump.

Is there anybody out there that can politely refute what I just said using RAW and where to find that RAW?

You have the free will to agree or disagree.
You have the ability to act freely on the above choice regardless of the consequences.

You can't change the distance of your jump once you're in the air, no, but getting a check result of "You clear 4 squares" does not mean you jump exactly 4 squares.

A character with an Athletics bonus of +20 is not incapable of jumping over a 5' gap and landing on the other side.
D&D Next = D&D: Quantum Edition
When you explain it that way, it makes sense.

There are times I wish the rules could be as clear as some of the explanations you guys come up with.

You have the free will to agree or disagree.
You have the ability to act freely on the above choice regardless of the consequences.

While it won't come up often, a creature might run out of movement if its speed changes during the action or something requires it to expend more movement than was expected. This isn't common, but various triggers or conditionals could (for example) apply the Slowed effect or cause a mid-jump Push.
I'd say its willing movement. So yes you can jump less you roll the athletics check and that is how far you can jump not how far you have to jump.
In the ways of the world working I see this as a long jumper wants to hop over a puddle he isn't going to jump his max distance for a 2 foot puddle.

Also Astromath I believe the bolded part there is for if you have a movement speed of 6 and run 4 squares to try and jump over 3 you have to use a double move or else you run out of movement trying to move 7 on that turn.
I had the amusing image of an immediate interrupt to grant an enemy a bonus to an athletics check to make them overshoot a jump.

That'd be hilarious.  And dumb.
D&D Next = D&D: Quantum Edition
I had the amusing image of an immediate interrupt to grant an enemy a bonus to an athletics check to make them overshoot a jump.

That'd be hilarious.  And dumb.



Hm... something workable along that line.

Encounter * Free Action

Trigger: An enemy you can see ends a jump or run adjacent to you, or is charging you and ends the movement portion of its charge within its reach of you.

Target: The triggering enemy

Effect: Slide the target two squares into a different square adjacent to your space. You may slide the target through your space. The target does not get bonuses or benefits for charging, does not have combat advantage, and grants combat advantage to you, until the end of your next turn.

"The world does not work the way you have been taught it does. We are not real as such; we exist within The Story. Unfortunately for you, you have inherited a condition from your mother known as Primary Protagonist Syndrome, which means The Story is interested in you. It will find you, and if you are not ready for the narrative strands it will throw at you..." - from Footloose
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